Articles By Charlie Miller

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Path: /mlb/2013-mlb-power-rankings-june-11
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Each week during the baseball season Athlon Sports looks at the best (St. Louis Cardinals) and worst (Miami Marlins) baseball teams and players in the league. Here's our MLB Power Rankings and Players of the Week.

1. Cardinals Plated seven 10th-inning runs Sunday for first extra-inning win.

2. Red Sox Only four games left in June vs. losing teams.

3. Braves Given up 19 runs over their last nine games.

4. Rangers Nelson Cruz is batting. 367 with RISP and two outs.

5. A’s At 20-8, A’s have majors’ best intradivision record.

6. Reds Should spruce up record vs. Cubs and Brewers this week.

7. Pirates Bucs batted just .184 last week.

8. Yankees Still don’t seem to be missing any superstars.

9. Diamondbacks Patrick Corbin: 9-0, 1.98; rest of rotation: 13-21, 4.91.

10. Tigers Swept Cleveland to build their biggest lead of the season.

11. Orioles Important four-game series with Red Sox this weekend.

12. Rays Have won nine of 10 against NL foes.

13. Rockies Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez are best 1-2 punch in NL.

14. Giants Buster Posey leads National Leaguers in All-Star votes.

15. Nationals 11-6 record is best NL mark for one-run games.

16. Phillies Spent one day over .500 this season — last Thursday.

17. Padres Everth Cabrera stole eight bases last week.

18. Indians Lost 11 straight (and counting) road games.

19. Angels Howie Kendrick hit .542 for the week.

20. Royals Opponents yet to score more than three runs in a game in June.

21. White Sox 3-10 since reaching .500 on Memorial Day weekend.

22. Twins Bullpen owns 1.14 WHIP and 2.93 ERA.

23. Mariners Jesus Montero batting .250, playing first base since demotion.

24. Dodgers Andre Ethier’s last RBI came on May 20.

25. Blue Jays Jose Reyes’ return on the horizon.

26. Brewers Where would this team be without the late signing of Kyle Lohse? 

27. Cubs Starlin Castro mired in a 1-for-24 slump.

28. Mets Taken seven of eight vs. AL teams.

29. Astros Lucas Harrell looks like a real ace.

30. Marlins Play six of next nine vs. division leaders.

AL Player of the Week

Brett Gardner, New York

The fleet outfielder had the best week of his season with 13 hits last week. The Yankees won six of seven and Gardner batted .520 with a home run, five runs and six extra-base hits. He capped the week with three hits on Saturday and four on Sunday.

 

AL Pitcher of the Week

David Phelps, New York

The righthander was inserted into the starting rotation in May, and the Yanks have won six of his eight starts, including two last week. Phelps tossed six shutout innings against Cleveland, then allowed only one run over six frames in a 2-1 win at Seattle.

 

NL Player of the Week

Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles

Not since Fernando Valenzuela in 1981 has a rookie for the Dodgers taken the baseball world by storm like Puig. The rookie totaled 13 hits in just seven games, including four homers and 10 RBIs.

 

NL Pitcher of the Week

Kris Medlen, Atlanta

The Braves and their fans carried high expectations of Medlen into this season after his terrific showing in 2012. In starts against Pittsburgh and the Dodgers last week, Medlen gave up just one run — which was unearned — over 13.2 innings to earn two wins. He also socked the first home run of his career.

Teaser:
<p> A look at the best and worst baseball teams in the league.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 12:29
Path: /mlb/16-amazing-mlb-stats-week-may-27-june-2
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Dom Brown finally goes off for the Phillies, Nationals can’t support their pitchers and the Tigers and Pirates struggled for runs. Another installment of some amazing numbers from MLB for the week of May 27-June 2.

7    Home Runs by Domonic Brown last week
The long-time, seemingly underachieving, prospect of the Phillies finally had a breakout month. After a .233-3-11 April with a .681 OPS, Brown responded to hit .319-13-29 with a 1.055 OPS over his next 30 games. Could the Phillies finally have the next anchor of their lineup?

17-13    Nationals record when they allow 1, 2 or 3 runs
The pitchers in Washington are getting the job done, it’s just that the team has a little trouble giving them any runs to work with. They are 7-1 when allowing just one run. But that drops to 7-6 when giving up two, and only 3-6 when allowing three runs. Put in layman’s terms, the Nats could maintain a 2.00 ERA and win about 92 games at this rate.

5    Pitchers who made six starts in May with a sub-2.00 ERA
Lefties Cliff Lee of Philadelphia, Jeff Locke of Pittsburgh, Mike Minor of Atlanta and Clayton Kershaw of the Dodgers joined righty Stephen Strasburg of Washington to comprise the quintet of hurlers with six starts and an ERA below 2.00 in May. The aggregate record of the group is 14-3 with 13 no-decisions in their 30 starts in May.

11-5     Phillies record vs. Mets and Marlins
With a three-game set against Miami this week, the Phillies have an opportunity to improve that mark. They are 16-25 against everyone else, including 2-4 vs. the Braves and Nationals, their other two NL East rivals.

5    Straight wins for the Astros
Houston finished the week with a five-game winning steak, including a sweep of the Angels in Los Angeles, but remains four games behind next-to-last in the AL.

14    Hits for Chris Davis last week
Lest you believe that Davis’s start this season is somewhat of a fluke, his bat has yet to cool off for the Orioles. He produced 14 hits last week, including four that left the park, and scored a majors-best 10 runs in leading Baltimore to a 5-2 mark for the week.

0-4    Record in May for James Shields
The Kansas City Royals’ righthander was winless in May despite a 1.08 WHIP and 2.92 ERA in his five starts.

3-1    Record in May for Jason Hammel
The Baltimore Orioles’ righthander won three games in May despite a 1.70 WHIP and 6.44 ERA in his five starts.

3    Singles by the Pirates to start an inning but didn’t score
On May 30, the Pirates touched Detroit pitcher Doug Fister for three singles without plating a run in the bottom of the fourth. Neil Walker singled, then was caught stealing. Andrew McCutchen and Garret Jones followed with base knocks before Russell Martin whiffed and Travis Snider flied out to left. No big deal, but…

4    Singles to start the fifth by the Tigers without scoring
The next inning, the Tigers did the Bucs one better. After the speed-challenged Matt Tuiasosopo and Bryan Pena opened with singles, Avisail Garcia lined a single to right and Travis Snider gunned out Tuiasosopo at the plate while holding Pena on second. Pitcher Doug Fister singled, but Pena was held at third. Two ground balls later, and Pittsburgh hurler Jeff Locke was safely out of the inning. Oh, the Pirates won 1-0 in 11 innings.

0    Shutouts by the Brewers this season
The Milwaukee Brewers’ lineup is formidable, but the pitching staff? Well, it’s pretty bad. The Brew Crew is the only staff in baseball without a shutout this season.

5    Walk-off losses this season for the Brewers and Marlins
Milwaukee and Miami lead the majors in being walked-off.

19    Home runs in 169 at-bats for David Ortiz when playing first base since 2005
While the debate over the DH rages, Ortiz continues to produce whether DHing in American League parks or manning first base in NL parks.

8    First inning run support for St. Louis pitchers’ debuts
Three youngsters made their major league debuts in the St. Louis rotation in May, and the Cardinals’ offense staked each to a lead after the first inning. The offense produced three first-inning runs for John Gast against the Mets on May 14. Tyler Lyons was also given a three spot against San Diego on May 22. Then Michael Wacha, the most heralded prospect of the three, was given a pair of runs against the Royals on May 30.

.409-6-21    Average, home runs and RBIs for Wil Myers in last 10 games at Triple-A Durham
The Rays would love to avoid Myers earning Super 2 status with extra service this season, but it’s time to give the prospect a call. Over his last 10 games at Triple-A Durham, he’s batting .409 with six home runs and 21 RBIs.

.433    OBP for Matt Carpenter since being moved to the leadoff
St. Louis manager moved Carpenter to the leadoff spot permanently on May 2 and the former TCU standout is batting .339 with 21 runs in 27 games. He has started at second, third, first and right field during that stretch, and St. Louis is 19-8.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Dom Brown finally goes off for the Phillies, Nationals can’t support their pitchers and the Tigers and Pirates struggled for runs. Another installment of some amazing numbers from MLB for the week of May 27-June2.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 - 13:55
Path: /mlb/MLB-best-prospects-by-position
Body:

Only hard-core baseball junkies are familiar with these names now, but in a few years all baseball fans will recognize these stars. Here’s a brief look at stars of the future who have yet to make their debuts in the major leagues.

Pitchers

Taijuan Walker, Seattle 
With above-average fastball, curve and change, Walker is clearly a future starter, but he must harness control issues. Through 10 starts at Double-A Jackson, opponents are batting just .190, but he has issued 27 walks in 59 innings.

Zack Wheeler, New York Mets
Acquired from the Giants for Carlos Beltran, the righthander possesses a fastball that nears triple digits. Fine-tuning his command and breaking pitches will get him to the majors, and that isn’t far away. In nine starts and 48.1 innings at Triple-A Las Vegas, he has 49 whiffs and allowed only 45 hits.

Gerrit Cole, Pittsburgh (pictured)
Last season, his first in pro ball, he progressed from High-A to Triple-A where he made one start. In 10 starts at Triple-A this season, opponents are hitting just .207. Cole owns a major-league ready fastball and curve. He’ll be in Pittsburgh by August.

Jameson Taillon, Pittsburgh
Pitching at Double-A this season, Taillon’s fastball will reach the upper 90s. He has 63 punchouts in 55.2 innings this season with a 2.19 ERA. As soon as he develops other pitches, he’ll join the
Pirates’ rotation, which should be in 2014.

Danny Hultzen, Seattle
The second-best left-handed prospect shined in his first four starts at Triple-A but hasn’t pitched since mid-April due to a rotator cuff problem. Red flag.

Archie Bradley, Arizona
After five tremendous starts at Single-A, Bradley has been even better at Double-A this season with a 0.69 ERA in five outings. He turns 21 in August and is on a fast track to the big leagues, although the Diamondbacks are adamant about not rushing him.

Chris Archer, Tampa Bay
With a fastball that reaches 98 and a tight slider, Archer could end up in the bullpen. Tampa Bay is his third organization and he’ll be 25 before the season ends.

Noah Syndergaard, New York Mets
Obtained in the R.A. Dickey trade over the winter, Syndergaard hasn’t disappointed the Mets. In nine starts at High-A Port St. Lucie, the 6'6" righthander has 52 strikeouts in 50.2 innings and has given up just one home run.


First Base

Jonathan Singleton, Houston
Long considered a top prospect in Philadelphia, Singleton is currently serving a suspension for a drug violation. He’s probably better suited for DH.

Keon Barnum, Chicago White Sox
The strong 20-year-old has prodigious power. The question will be whether he can develop consistency at the plate.


Second Base

Kolten Wong, St. Louis
Nothing about Wong will wow you except that he is a ballplayer. Speed, bat and glove are all just a tad above average, but his instincts, will and work ethic should land him a job in the majors and keep him there a long time.

Delino DeShields, Jr., Houston
Speed is his greatest asset, and the son of the former major leaguer has solid makeup and athleticism. He projects as a sturdy leadoff hitter and if his defense doesn’t cut it at second, he’ll make a solid center fielder.

Jonathan Schoop, Baltimore
Originally a shortstop, Schoop can play all over the infield. Second base seems to be where the Orioles need him most.

Nick Franklin, Seattle
Originally a shortstop, Franklin has split time at both middle infield positions this season. In 2010, he had 23 homers and 25 steals at Single-A Clinton.


Third Base

Miguel Sano, Minnesota
Sano turned 20 a few weeks ago and is tearing up the Florida State League with a .354 average and 23 extra-base hits including 11 homers in his first 40 games.


Shortstop

Francisco Lindor, Cleveland (pictured)
A few years ago, Lindor was the youngest player in the Futures Game. He’s considered the best defensive shortstop in the minors, and is batting .331 at Single-A.

Javier Baez, Chicago Cubs
While not as refined at the plate as Lindor, Baez has more power. It will be interesting to see who eventually moves to third base, Baez or current Chicago shortstop Starlin Castro.

Xander Bogaerts, Boston
If Jose Iglesias ever blossoms for Boston, Bogaerts could move to third, shifting Will Middlebrooks to first.

Carlos Correa, Houston
His glove is well ahead of his bat, but his .410 OBP this season at Single-A isn’t too shabby.

Addison Russell, Oakland
He’s scuffling at .189 this season, but hit .369 across three levels in 2012.

Hak-Ju Lee, Tampa Bay
In the midst of a breakout season at the plate for Triple-A Durham, Lee suffered torn knee ligaments and will miss the remainder of the year.


Outfield

Oscar Taveras, St. Louis
Without question, Taveras is the highest-prized prospect not yet called up to the big leagues. The Cardinals’ expectation is that he will be a regular in the Redbirds’ outfield next season.

Wil Myers, Tampa Bay
Outside of Jurickson Profar, Myers has received more attention than anyone in the minors this season. Only a matter of time before he’s helping Evan Longoria carry the Rays’ offense.

Christian Yelich, Miami
The 21-year-old has 20 extra-base hits, 23 runs and 23 RBIs in his first 26 games at Double-A.

Byron Buxton, Minnesota
Twins fans have been dreaming of an outfield that includes Buxton and Aaron Hicks. Buxton is still a few years away, and Hicks has appeared overmatched so far this season.

Nick Castellanos, Detroit
Originally a third baseman, he moved to the outfield this season, which is his quickest track to Detroit. Castellanos is a pure hitter with developing power.

Billy Hamilton, Cincinnati
Most fans are familiar with his 155 steals last season. But in his first foray into Triple-A, he’s struggled at the plate with a .228 average and .286 OBP.

Bubba Starling, Kansas City
Drafted in 2011, Starling chose the Royals over the opportunity to play quarterback at Nebraska. He hasn’t exactly exploded onto the scene, hitting just .213 this season at Single-A.

Jorge Soler, Chicago Cubs
The Cubs are excited about the young outfielder, currently hitting .296 and slugging .528 at Single-A Daytona.

Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles Dodgers
Signed to a seven-year, $42 million deal out of Cuba last year, Puig has raw power and gave the Dodgers a glimpse during spring training just how good he can be.


Catchers

Mike Zunino, Seattle (pictured)
The third overall pick in 2012 progressed quickly up to Double-A last season hitting .333 in 15 games. Success hasn’t come as easy at Triple-A this season, but the Mariners are convinced he is their long-term solution behind the plate.

Travis d’Arnaud, New York Mets
Multiple knee injuries have prevented d’Arnaud from being in the bigs already. His forte is his bat with some power. He’s worked diligently to improve his throwing. The Mets would love to see him completely healthy and in New York in 2014.

Gary Sanchez, New York Yankees
He won’t turn 21 until December and has serious power. He hasn’t mastered the nuances behind the plate, but he has a terrific arm. He’s currently hitting .279 at High-A Tampa.

Austin Hedges, San Diego
The Padres spent $3 million on their 2011 second-round pick believing he would be a long-term solution behind the plate. Defensively he has all the tools to be one of the best. His bat will probably never grade as high as his glove, but he has 11 walks and only 11 whiffs so far this season at High-A
Lake Elsinore, which lifts his OBP.

Christian Bethancourt, Atlanta
The Panama native’s prowess behind the plate and outstanding throwing arm may alone be enough for him to replace Brian McCann by 2015. If he improves his plate discipline, that could happen sooner.

Teaser:
<p> Athlon looks at the top stars of tomorrow on the baseball diamond.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 16:30
All taxonomy terms: MLB
Path: /mlb/15-amazing-mlb-stats-week-may-20-26
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Each week, Athlon Sports highlights the most important, intriguing and bizarre stats in baseball.

11-4   Indians’ record in one-run games
Last season much was made of the one-run magic that took up residence in Baltimore (29-9) and stayed all season. But Cleveland had a little magic of its own with a 24-12 record in one-run affairs. It appears that this magic has put down deeper roots in Cleveland. This season, the Indians continue to play well in close games with an 11-4 mark in one-run games, making them the best in the majors.
 
5-0   Indians’ mark in extra-inning games
Cleveland remains the last undefeated team in extra frames this season.
 
+4   Run total difference between Oakland and Texas
Even after a doubleheader for Texas on Memorial Day, the A’s had outscored the Rangers through the first 51 games. It seems that a lineup that starts with Coco Crisp and features some combination of Jed Lowrie, Seth Smith, Yoenis Cespedes, Brandon Moss and Josh Donaldson in the middle is a tad better than Ian Kinsler, Elvis Andrus, Lance Berkman, Adrian Beltre and Nelson Cruz.
 
14  Wins by Matt Moore and Alex Cobb
The two young studs for Tampa Bay have the most wins this season of any pitching combination in the big leagues.
 
34 Quality Starts by Philadelphia
Perhaps this item should be in the Meaningless Stats column. The Phillies’ starters have logged the most Quality Starts in baseball this season as defined by MLB. However, the rotation carries a 4.18 ERA (16th in MLB), has only 16 wins (tied for 19th) and opponents are batting .251 (14th). So maybe it’s time to redefine Quality Start.
 
10-5, 2.43  W-L record and ERA for Felix Hernandez and Hisashi Iwakuma
When the two hurlers take the mound for the Mariners, good things seem to follow. When others start for Seattle, very little good happens. The rest of the rotation is a combined 6-17, 6.78.
 
6-33  Houston record when scoring less than six runs
Okay, we know the Astros aren’t very good. In fact, they are really bad. But the pitchers are giving the team no chance to win. Asking the lineup to produce six runs every night is a bit much. And when the offense is missing — as is the case most nights — losing happens.
 
1 Series win at Tampa Bay for the Yankees in last 10 visits
When the Yankees rallied for two ninth-inning runs and subsequently won in 11 innings on a Lyle Overbay home run last Saturday, it marked the first time in 10 tries that New York has won a series at Tampa Bay.
 
.500  Prince Fielder’s batting average after an intentional walk to Miguel Cabrera
How tempting is it to intentionally pass Miguel Cabrera, the best hitter in the game? And how important is it for Miggy to have protection in the Detroit lineup? Since joining the Tigers last season, Prince Fielder is batting .500 (8-for-16) with 11 RBIs following an intentional walk to Cabrera.
 
.667 Pirates’ winning percentage in May
The Pittsburgh Pirates ended Memorial Day with a 16-8 record in May, the third-best in all of baseball. It just so happens, it’s also the third-best in the NL Central, which means that Pittsburgh has lost ground to both St. Louis and Cincinnati this month. #ToughDivision
 
10-0 Diamondbacks’ record when Patrick Corbin starts
Last week the young lefthander won both of his starts, defeating division rivals Colorado and San Diego. Corbin went the distance against the Rockies allowing just three hits and a walk. He is now 8-0 with a 1.71 ERA on the season and the Diamondbacks have won all 10 of his starts.
 
57 RBIs for Miguel Cabrera
Miggy has driven home 57 runs in his first 48 games. The only player with more than 162 RBIs in a 162-game season is Manny Ramirez of the Cleveland Indians in 1999.
 
.000  Lefthanders’ batting average against Francisco Liriano
 Through his first three starts of the season, left-handed batters are 0-for-12 off Liriano, who began the season with five rehab starts in the minor leagues.
 
13  Consecutive wins by the St. Louis Cardinals on May 21 
The last time the Redbirds lost on that date was in 1998. In that game, Philadelphia manager Terry Francona called on current Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro to pinch-hit.
 
5  Consecutive road games in which the Orioles’ Manny Machado had three hits
The young third baseman is batting .363 in 27 games away from home this season.
Teaser:
<p> Highlighting the most important, intriguing and bizarre stats in baseball.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 - 16:00
Path: /mlb/18-amazing-mlb-stats-week-may-13-19
Body:

Matt Cain is giving up bombs, Ryan Howard is wilting in the clutch, James Shields has little to show for his efforts and the consistent Joey Votto just keeps hitting. Here’s this week’s Amazing Stats for May 13-19.

2    Games Braves played with best lineup
Atlanta is in first place in the NL East, but the club has played just two games — last Friday and Saturday — with what manager Fredi Gonzalez expected to be his best eight in the field. Catcher Brian McCann has been recovering from shoulder surgery, and right fielder Jason Heyward missed some time after an appendectomy. The Braves won both games.

.050    Ryan Howard’s batting average with RISP, two outs
Entering this season, Howard carried a career .268 average with runners in scoring position with two outs. So far in 2013, he’s 1-for-20.

3    Teams still perfect this season when leading after six innings
The Texas Rangers blew their first save of the season over the weekend against the Tigers, but won the game anyway to go to 23-0 when leading after six innings. The Yankees (21-0) and Cleveland (19-0) are the other two teams. Coincidence that all three reside in first place?

13    Home runs allowed by Matt Cain of the San Francisco Giants this season
The total leads the majors and is four more than Cain gave up in all of 2010, when he logged more than 220 innings.

22    Percent of the Dodgers’ RBIs driven in by Adrian Gonzalez
Earlier this season, Carl Crawford was responsible for an inordinate high percentage of the Dodgers’ runs. Now Gonzalez shows a similar high percentage of the team’s RBIs.  It’s time for Matt Kemp to step up and contribute to the offense.

2    Players to hit three homers in a loss twice since 2000
Players have hit three home runs in a losing cause a total of 16 times since 2000. Two players have done it twice. Miguel Cabrera of the Tigers did it for the second time last Sunday night. Sammy Sosa did it twice in 2001.

.583    Joey Votto batting average for the week
Quietly and consistently, the Reds’ first baseman shows why he is the best hitter in the National League. He hit .583 last week with a pair of home runs, five RBIs and seven runs. He drew five walks to go with his 14 hits over the six games.

.193    Batting average of leadoff No. 1 hitters against Kansas City
Leadoff hitters haven’t fared well against the Royals’ pitching this season. This average is 32 points lower than the next best (Pittsburgh, .225). The Royals are also the only team yet to give up a home run to the first batter in the lineup.

2    First batters of any inning to score off Yu Darvish
Going into his start against the Tigers last Thursday night, Yu Darvish of Texas had not allowed the first batter of any inning to score this season. In fact, just 10 of 53 had even made it the first 90 feet. That changed in the third inning when Don Kelly of Detroit homered off of the Texas righthander. Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta led off the fourth inning with a homer as well. Now 12 of 61 have reached base safely, and just two have scored.

16    Scoreless innings for Justin Masterson last week
The Cleveland ace pitched a complete game shutout over the Yankees and followed up with seven shutout innings in a 6-0 win over Seattle. For the week, he threw 16 innings, gave up seven hits, five walks and struck out 20. The surging Indians have won eight of Masterson’s 10 starts this season, scoring a total of three runs in the two losses. Masterson is working on a scoreless innings streak of 19.1 innings.

.509    Miguel Cabrera’s batting average with runners in scoring position
With two outs and RISP, Miggy’s average jumps to .600. It’s no wonder he’s a candidate to win a second Triple Crown this season.

.077    Martin Prado’s batting average with runners in scoring position
Among batters with as many as 35 ABs this season, Prado owns the lowest average. But it’s still early and this is a relatively small sample size, so expect this number to climb. The Diamondbacks are in first place despite this deficiency.

5    Starts of 8+ innings and three or less runs for James Shields
Kansas City’s James Shields continues to get saddled with tough losses. He’s gone eight innings in his last three starts, given up a total of five runs (four earned) and is 0-2 during that time. Shields has pitched eight innings or more five times this season, giving up three runs or less each start. For his efforts, the team has rewarded him with an 0-3 record in those games.

2    St. Louis Cardinals batting .400+ with RISP
There are a scant nine hitters with as many as 35 ABs batting .400 with runners in scoring position. Matt Holliday of St. Louis ended the week at .444. Teammate Allen Craig stood at an even .400. The Cardinals are the only team with two at or above the .400 mark.

14-9    Baltimore’s road record this season
The Orioles ended the week as the only team with a winning record on the road and a losing mark at home (9-11).

15    Times since 2010 Jaime Garcia has left a game with a lead, but didn’t win
The St. Louis lefthander has had the toughest luck of any pitcher in baseball since 2010 with his bullpen holding leads. He’s left with a lead 15 times, only to see the advantage — along with his win — disappear.

.149    Opponents batting average vs. Matt Harvey
The young New York Mets’ ace has held hitters to a .149 average, the best in the majors this season.

.369    Opponents batting average vs. Vance Worley and Joe Blanton
Hitters are feasting on Worley and Blanton this season.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Matt Cain is giving up bombs, Ryan Howard is wilting in the clutch, James Shields has little to show for his efforts and the consistent Joey Votto just keeps hitting. Here’s this week’s Amazing Stats for May 13-19.<br />  </p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - 12:30
Path: /mlb/2013-mlb-power-rankings-may-20
Body:

Each week during the baseball season Athlon Sports looks at the best (Texas Rangers) and worst (Houston Astros) baseball teams and players in the league. Here's our MLB Power Rankings and Players of the Week.

  1. Rangers—Texas survived first blown save and three HRs by Miggy.

2. Cardinals—Young pitchers must step up to replaced injured starters.

3. Yankees—In first place in tough division despite numerous injuries.

4. Red Sox—Would like to have Justin Masterson-Victor Martinez trade back.

5. Reds—Johnny Cueto’s return improves an already strong rotation.

6. Pirates—Tied for second-best record in NL.

7. Giants—Lost four games in which they’ve scored six runs or more.

8. Braves—First time all season best lineup on the field together.

9. Nationals—Sputtering offense has scored just nine runs in last six losses.

10. Indians—Won 17 of 21, but can starting pitching hold up?

11. Rays—Injury to David Price could be devastating to surging Rays.

12. Tigers—Starting pitchers did not enjoy trip to Texas.

13. Diamondbacks—Won nine of 13 to bolt back into first place.

14. Rockies—Plated 31 runs while taking three of four from Giants.

15. Orioles—Winning road record (14-9), losing at home (9-11).

16. A’s—Won three one-run games in sweep over Royals.

17. Phillies—Ryan Howard: .050 with runners in scoring position, 2 outs.

18. Padres—Won 15 of last 20 when not playing at Tampa Bay.

19. Royals—Leadoff hitters are batting just .190 off K.C. pitching.

20. Mariners—No. 9 hitters batting an NL-esque .151.

21. Twins—Tough tests at Atlanta and Detroit this week.

22. White Sox—Offense begins and ends with Alex Rios.

23. Cubs—Would Cubs really consider a move from Wrigley?

24. Mets—David Wright/Daniel Murphy: .307; rest of team: .209.

25. Blue Jays—Batted .303 last week, but team ERA was 5.02.

26. Dodgers—Adrian Gonzalez has 22 percent of team’s RBIs.

27. Angels—This lack of winning isn’t what Albert Pujols signed up for.

28. Brewers—Lineup is too good to be this bad. 

29. Marlins—Suffered four three-game sweeps this season.

30. Astros—Thankfully, Houston and Miami will not meet in 2013.

 

Al Player of the Week

Miguel Cabrera, Detroit

Miggy continues to separate himself from the rest of the league, much like Barry Bonds did 10 years ago. With four hits, including three home runs, Cabrera raised his major-league leading batting average to .387. He batted .429 with seven RBIs and seven runs for the week.

 

AL Pitcher of the Week

Justin Masterson, Cleveland

The surging Indians have won eight of Masterson’s 10 starts this season, scoring a total of three runs in the two losses. The new Cleveland ace pitched a complete game shutout over the Yankees last week, and followed up with seven shutout innings in a 6-0 win over Seattle. For the week, he threw 16 innings, gave up seven hits, five walks and struck out 20.

 

NL Player of the Week

Joey Votto, Cincinnati

Quietly and consistently, the Reds’ first baseman shows why he is the best hitter in the National League. He hit .583 last week with a pair of home runs, five RBIs and seven runs. He drew five walks to go with his 14 hits over the six games.

 

NL Pitcher of the Week

Homer Bailey, Cincinnati

After a complete game win over Miami, Bailey tossed seven shutout innings at Philadelphia in the Reds’ 3-2 loss. Over his 16 innings last week, Bailey allowed 11 hits, a walk and struck out 13.

Teaser:
<p> A look at the best and worst baseball teams in the league.</p>
Post date: Monday, May 20, 2013 - 15:55
Path: /mlb/12-amazing-mlb-stats-week-may-6-12
Body:

Cincinnati can win only against bad teams, Dee Gordon is fast, the Texas bullpen is good and the Astros may have trouble when they play at Texas. Here are these and other amazing stats from the week of May 6-12.

27    Retired Rockies in order by Shelby Miller
The young St. Louis righthander made just one start last week, but what an outing it was. Miller allowed a leadoff single to Eric Young in the first inning, then retired the next 27 Rockies in order. Obviously, he doesn’t get credit for a perfect game, and the one-hitter was the first shutout of his career.

23-4    Giants outscored Braves by 19 over the weekend
After the Braves defeated the Giants 6-3 behind the pitching of Julio Teheran on Thursday night, the rest of the weekend series shaped up for three pitching duels. Matt Cain and Tim Hudson on Friday, Madison Bumgarner vs. Paul Maholm on Saturday with Tim Lincecum and Kris Medlen going on Sunday. However, the Giants’ pitchers were the only arms doing any dueling. San Francisco bashed Atlanta pitching as the Giants outscored the Braves 23-4 in the final three games.

1    Time this season Josh Hamilton has driven home Albert Pujols
When Los Angeles Angels owner Arte Moreno signed former MVP Josh Hamilton last winter for $125 million over the next five seasons, just a year after signing Albert Pujols to a record deal, he probably expected a little more. Fans were excited, too about the prospects of Hamilton hitting cleanup behind Pujols. But through Sunday, Hamilton had driven in Pujols just once this season.

5-11    Atlanta Braves record in their last 16 road games
During that stretch, the Braves’ ERA has ballooned to 5.52. In the team’s first seven away games this season, the club was 7-0 with a 1.41 ERA.

11.2    Seconds it took Dodgers shortstop Dee Gordon to score from first
Gordon, on first after a single to right, was off and running on a double by Nick Punto off the Diamondbacks’ Wade Miley. Gordon, whose father was known as Flash, raced around the bases in 11.2 seconds as timed by the media.

4    Fewest home losses, and road wins for any team
The Texas Rangers have lost just four games at home this season, the fewest in the majors. Their Texas brethren in Houston have won just four road games, also the fewest in the big leagues this season. The Astros have yet to visit their division rival this season with nine games to play at Texas.

6-13     Cincinnati’s record against winning teams
The Reds are feasting on the downtrodden this season. The Reds ended the week with a 16-3 record against losing teams, and just 6-13 vs. winning teams. Beginning this week, the Reds’ next 12 games are against losers.

19-3    Detroit’s record when scoring 4+ runs
When the Tigers score three runs or less, their pitchers have little hope. The team is 1-12 when scoring fewer than four runs. Strangely enough, the Tigers have yet to score exactly five runs in a game this season.

15, 10    Home runs and stolen bases by the Blue Jays
Last week the Toronto Blue Jays dominated the power/speed categories. The Jays led the majors with 15 long balls and 10 swipes.

.600        Joe Mauer’s OBP last week
The Twins’ catcher, batting in the No. 2 hole, is batting .465 in May with a .574 OBP. He has scored 13 in the last 11 games.

0    Blown saves by the Texas Rangers
The Texas bullpen has been charged with closing out 12 games and remains the only team in baseball with a perfect record. Texas relievers have been called on a combined 28 times with the game on the line, and each time the pitcher has done his job. Joe Nathan gets most of the ink with his 11 saves. Michael Kirkman has one save, Derek Lowe has one hold and Joe Ortiz has two. However, Robbie Ross and Tanner Scheppers have done much of the heavy lifting. Ross has stranded all 15 runners he has inherited. Scheppers has inherited just three, but left them all on base.

31    RBIs for Brandon Phillips and Troy Tulowitzki this season
The Reds’ second baseman and Rockies’ shortstop are tied atop the National League with 31 RBIs. No middle infielder has led the senior circuit in ribbies since the great Ernie Banks in 1959 when he drove home 143 during the second of his back-to-back MVP campaigns.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Cincinnati can win only against bad teams, Dee Gordon is fast, the Texas bullpen is good and the Astros may have trouble when they play at Texas. Here are these and other amazing stats from the week of May 6-12.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 15:25
All taxonomy terms: MLB, News
Path: /mlb/2013-mlb-power-rankings-may-14
Body:

Each week during the season Athlon Sports looks at the best (Texas Rangers) and worst (Houston Astros) baseball teams and players in the league. Here's our MLB Power Rankings and Players of the Week.

 1. Rangers Scheppers-Ross-Nathan bullpen is tough to crack.
 
 2. Giants Matt Cain with back-to-back strong starts.
 
 3. Cardinals Even with sketchy bullpen, allowed fewest runs in majors.
 
 4. Yankees Won five straight, four by two runs or less. #MoreCloseGames
 
 5. Nationals Jordan Zimmermann leads NL with six wins.
 
 6. Red Sox Lost five of seven at the hands of Twins and Blue Jays.
 
 7. Orioles Only 6-5 in one-run games this season.
 
 8. Reds Just 6-13 against teams with winning records.
 
 9. Pirates Next 13 games vs. Brewers, Astros and Cubs.
 
10. Tigers 19-3 when scoring 4+ runs; 1-12 when scoring fewer.
 
11. Braves Justin Upton hasn’t homered since April 27.
 
12. Diamondbacks Committed just eight errors this season.
 
13. Rockies Won just seven of last 20 as bullpen innings mount.
 
14. A’s Recent 3-7 road trip featured .210 batting average, 4.55 ERA.
 
15. Rays Broke out with 52 runs to lead majors last week.
 
16. Royals Alex Gordon is carrying the offense.
 
17. Mariners Bats remain silent hitting just .211 in May.
 
18. Indians Majors’ best record in May at 9-2.
 
19. Phillies Right side of infield has 46 of team’s 82 RBIs.
 
20. Twins Joe Mauer: .600 OBP, 10 runs last week.
 
21. Padres Headley and Venable hitting .344 in May, rest of team, .176.
 
22. White Sox Chris Sale toyed with history last Sunday.
 
23. Cubs Kevin Gregg, yep, that Kevin Gregg, leads team with six saves.
 
24. Mets Matt Harvey just keeps dealing.
 
25. Blue Jays Led majors in home runs (15) and steals (10) last week.
 
26. Dodgers Five of eight losses in May by one run.
 
27. Brewers Carlos Gomez, Jean Segura are 1-2 in NL batting race. 
 
28. Angels On pace to lose 100 games.
 
29. Marlins Have won just one series this season.
 
30. Astros Opponents are batting .300.
 
 
AL Player of the Week
Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay
The Rays are beginning to perk up and it’s no surprise that Longoria has been carrying the offense. Last week he hit safely in all seven games, batting .464 with a 1,496 OPS. He had eight extra-base hits, three homers and drove in 11 runs.
 
AL Pitcher of the Week
Chris Sale, Chicago
The lanky lefty’s gem on Sunday night against the Angels provided the highlight, but Sale was terrific in both starts last week. In addition to the one-hitter Sunday, Sale allowed just one run in 7.1 innings for a no-decision in a win at Kansas City. In 16.1 innings, Sale had a 0.43 WHIP and 0.59 ERA.
 
 
NL Player of the Week
Jean Segura, Milwaukee
The Brewers haven’t been very good recently, but their shortstop has been outstanding in the field and at the dish. Last week he batted .500 with four multi-hit games in the Brewers’ five games. Over the weekend at Cincinnati, he was 8-for-12 with a pair of homers, two doubles and four runs.
 
 
NL Pitcher of the Week
Shelby Miller, St. Louis
The young righthander made just one start last week, but what an outing it was. Miller allowed a leadoff single to Eric Young in the first inning, then retired the next 27 in order. The one-hitter was the first shutout of his career.
Teaser:
<p> A look at the best and worst baseball teams in the league.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - 11:11
Path: /mlb/blown-home-run-call-exposes-flaw-mlb-replay-system
Body:

Last night, Adam Rosales of Oakland launched an apparent game-tying home run in the ninth inning at Cleveland only to have it ruled a double by the umpiring crew. After reviewing the call via replay, the umpiring crew, led by Angel Hernandez, emerged and held Rosales at second base.

MLB, slow to enter the digital age and catch up to the wonders of instant replay with the ability to right wrongs called on the field, still has much work to do to with its replay system.

It’s pretty clear that the three umpires reviewing the play were the only people who believe the ball hit the outfield wall. I’ve watched replays of the Oakland broadcast, the Cleveland broadcast and heard replays of both teams’ radio calls, and every announcer involved felt it was clearly a home run. In every replay I saw it appeared the ball hit the dark railing beyond the wall, clearly above the yellow line marking the top of the outfield fence. I’ve yet to see or hear any reports of anyone saying, “Good call, that ball hit the wall.” And I’m sure we won’t.

So how did Hernandez and his crew miss that? Good question. If you want to give the umpires the benefit of a doubt, there have been complaints from the arbiters in the past that they don’t have access to all the angles that fans see at home. Why that might be the case is unclear, unacceptable and certainly something that should be rectified immediately. But in this case, I’m not sure what angles might be inconclusive. The ball hit the railing. It changed direction above the wall. Unless the umpires were viewing replays on a black and white, 14-inch, non-HD monitor, I don’t understand how they could reach their conclusion.

Now we don’t know that the outcome would have been different. Had the home run counted, the game would have been tied with the A’s batting in the ninth inning. At any rate, this was a pivotal call. And MLB must get these calls right.

MLB’s replay system failed. The system didn’t just fail the A’s, but all of baseball. If the system in place can’t guarantee the right call in this situation, then how do we expect any calls to be right?

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Adam Rosales launched an apparent game-tying home run...or did he?</p>
Post date: Thursday, May 9, 2013 - 11:14
Path: /mlb/16-amazing-mlb-stats-week-april-29-may-5
Body:

There's never a shortage for cool numbers in baseball. Cleanup hitters struggle, a former utilityman goes off and some dude who's never closed games before is perfect. Go figure (which is what we've been doing).

1.150    Bryce Harper’s OPS for April
At age 20, Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals led the National League with a 1.150 OPS in April, becoming the youngest player to lead the NL in OPS after April since 1965 when Ed Kranepool of the Mets batted .418 with a 1.161 OPS. In case you’re wondering, the New York first baseman ended the season at .253/.675. 

12    Saves in 12 attempts for closer Jason Grilli of the Pirates
The 36-year-old righthander had just five saves at the major league level and three in the minors — in his career — prior to closing games for Pittsburgh this season.

16    Home runs for Boston at Toronto this season
In six games at Toronto this season, the Red Sox have clubbed 16 homers. Boston bats have been much quieter in their other 25 games totaling just 17 clouts.

.591    Ryan Raburn’s batting average for the week
The former Detroit utilityman has found a home in right field in Cleveland. Last week, Raburn hit .591 with two four-hit games, a three-hit game and a two-hit game. He homered twice in back-to-back games for his only four long balls of the season. During the week, he raised his season batting average from .214 to .344.

.188    Batting average for Milwaukee cleanup hitters this season
After losing Prince Fielder to free agency prior to last season, the Brewers enlisted third baseman Aramis Ramirez to hit cleanup and protect Ryan Braun in the lineup. Ramirez responded well last season. But the third baseman has spent most of this season on the DL and the Brewers have found no suitable replacement behind Braun.

8    RBIs by the Mets’ Ike Davis this season
It’s not for the lack of opportunity, Davis has come to bat with 37 runners in scoring position this season. He’s 4-for-27 with 13 Ks with ducks on the pond.

12    Stolen base attempts for St. Louis in 2013
These are not your father’s St. Louis Cardinals. The running Redbirds of the 1980s made the stolen base fashionable as Whiteyball turned the Cardinals into one of the best clubs throughout the decade. With just 12 stolen base attempts this season, St. Louis ranks last in the majors. At least the 83 percent success rate is tied for sixth. Two players have more steals than the entire Cardinals team.

14    Strikeouts for Yu Darvish vs Boston
In his last start, Darvish whiffed 14 Boston batters over seven innings. It was the second time this season that the young righthander has struck out 14. He punched out 14 Astros during the first week of the season. Darvish is only the second Texas Rangers pitcher to strike out at least 14 batters in one game twice. The other? Nolan Ryan, of course, who did it seven times.

11    Come-from-behind wins for Kansas City this season
In those 11 comeback wins, 10 different players have driven home the winning run.

6    Pinch-hit home runs for Jordany Valdespin
Jordany Valdespin of the New York Mets has six home runs in 59 career pinch-hitting appearances. The extra outfielder has four homers in 212 non-pinch-hitting plate appearances.

6    Consecutive seasons St. Louis has ended April in first place
The Cardinals’ conversion rate over the past five years for completing the season in first place is just 20 percent.

37.2    Innings pitched by the Oakland bullpen last week
The busy bullpen logged more innings than the starters last week. Of course, it didn’t help that the A’s and Angels played 19 innings on Monday. The starters threw 35.1 innings.

4 and 1    Saves and Wins for Sergio Romo of San Francisco last week
San Francisco’s closer made five appearances last week and notched four saves and a win. He retired 15 of the 18 batters he faced, allowing just three singles. His durability and reliability permit Bruce Bochy to manage games cautiously to the Giants’ advantage.

11    Wins by the Yankees of less than three runs
The Yankees are not afraid to play close games. And why not with Mariano Rivera lurking in the bullpen. Of the Yankees’ first 18 wins, five of them have been one-run games and six of the wins were by two runs.

6    Catcher Interference calls this season
Of the six catcher interference calls in the majors this season, D-backs hitters have been the beneficiaries three times. Can you coach that?

.182    Phillies batting average last week
The Phils surprisingly managed to win two of six games last week with the worst batting average in the majors for the week. Philadelphia defeated Miami twice, but was shutout twice, once by the Marlins and once at Cleveland.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Cleanup hitters struggle, a former utilityman goes off and some dude who's never closed games before is perfect.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 11:55
Path: /mlb/2013-mlb-power-rankings-may-7
Body:

Each week during the season Athlon Sports looks at the best (Texas Rangers) and worst (Houston Astros) baseball teams and players in the league. Here's our MLB Power Rankings and Players of the Week.

 
1. Rangers Yu Darvish has strikeout pitch working this season.
 
2. Red Sox Bats went silent in sweep at the hands of the Rangers.
 
3. Giants Buster Posey, Guillermo Quiroz hit walk-off HRs in sweep over L.A.
 
4. Cardinals A 13-6 road record boosts Redbirds to best overall mark in NL.
 
5. Tigers Miguel Cabrera three home runs shy of Triple Crown position.
 
6. Braves 10-game roadie on tap against three +.500 teams.
7. Yankees Just one of last eight wins by more than two runs. #CloseGames
8. A’s Busy bullpen logged more innings than starters last week.
 
9. Nationals Must get Adam LaRoche’s bat going.
 
10. Royals Five postponements already this season.
 
11. Rockies Haven’t won two in a row since April 20.
 
12. Reds Hit just two homers, but won four of six last week.
 
13. Pirates 16-9 since horrendous 1-5 start.
 
14. Orioles First team to play 20 road games already this season.
 
15. Diamondbacks Only team in NL West with winning road record.
 
16. Rays No Rays hitter has been intentionally walked this season.
 
17. Phillies Offense bottomed out at .182 over last seven days.
 
18. Mariners Batting just .223 on the road.
 
19. Twins Lead-off hitters have majors-worst .248 OBP.
 
20. Brewers Cleanup hitters batting .188 with no home runs. 
 
21. Padres Jedd Gyorko making Rookie of the Year push.
 
22. Indians Batted .338 last week, which led majors.
 
23. Dodgers 64 extra-base hits rank lowest in majors.
 
24. Mets Of 37 runners in scoring position, Ike Davis has driven in eight.
 
25. White Sox Only Miami has scored fewer runs this season.
 
26. Angels Too talented — and too expensive — to be this far down.
 
27. Cubs Anthony Rizzo beginning to heat up — .357 last week.
 
28. Blue Jays Quickly settling in at the bottom of this list.
 
29. Marlins Swapping places with Houston may happen a lot in 2013.
 
30. Astros With eight wins, only team stuck in single digits.
 
 
AL Pitcher of the Week
Justin Verlander, Detroit
The Tigers’ ace has allowed two runs or fewer in each of his last five starts. Last week, in two outings, he pitched 14 innings and gave up just seven hits and four walks with 17 strikeouts. He won both games with an ERA of 0.64 and a 0.79 WHIP.
 
 
AL Player of the Week
Ryan Raburn, Cleveland
The former Detroit utilityman has found a home in right field in Cleveland. Last week, Raburn hit .591 with two four-hit games, a three-hit game and a two-hit game. He homered twice in back-to-back games for his only four long balls of the season. During the week, he raised his season batting average from .214 to .344.
 
 
 
NL Player of the Week
Carlos Gomez, Milwaukee
It appears that the fleet center fielder known for his defensive prowess has turned the corner offensively. Last week he hit .462 with three home runs. His eight runs, six extra-base hits and five steals all tied for the best in the majors.
 
 
NL Pitcher of the Week
Sergio Romo, San Francisco
San Francisco’s closer made five appearances last week and notched four saves and a win. He retired 15 of the 18 batters he faced, allowing just three singles. His durability and reliability permit Bruce Bochy to manage games cautiously to the Giants’ advantage.
Teaser:
<p> A look at the best and worst baseball teams in the league.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 11:00
Path: /mlb/15-most-indispensable-players-baseball
Body:

At the end of the season, the major awards voters will evaluate players in their own way, with a variety of definitions applied to the word “Valuable” in Most Valuable Player. There are the Sabermetricians who will argue each player’s effect on his team winning, commonly using the Wins Above Replacement (WAR) stats. Traditionalists will focus on raw stats that can be calculated without logarithms. But what about the players that teams can ill-afford to lose, the truly indispensable? Some of the players mentioned below will get MVP consideration, others will not. But at this point in the season, these are the 15 most indispensable players.

 
1. Clayton Kershaw, L.A. Dodgers
The Dodgers’ offense, with all its expensive firepower, has been strikingly anemic this season. With a largely unproven bullpen and starters Chad Billingsley (Tommy John surgery) and Zack Greinke (broken collarbone) out, Kershaw must carry this pitching staff, which gets little offensive support.
 
2. Yadier Molina, St. Louis
St. Louis pitchers never shake off their catcher. If Yadi puts it down, that’s what they throw. Manager Mike Matheny regularly rotates his lineup to give players an occasional day off, but Molina rarely gets a break, and no one is missed more than the backstop. He’s missed one game this season, a loss naturally. And if that weren’t enough, there’s high praise from the Redbirds’ former manager Tony La Russa, who called Molina the most indispensable player on the Cardinals — and that was when Albert Pujols was still on the roster and in his prime.
 
3. Buster Posey, San Francisco
When the former Rookie of the Year and the 2012 MVP is healthy, the Giants win the World Series. The lineup is not very deep and Posey hits for average and power as well as drives in runs.
 
4. Joey Votto, Cincinnati
The Reds’ first baseman drew 24 walks in the first 16 games. That’s Barry Bonds territory. No hitter in Cincinnati’s lineup garners more respect from opponents than Votto, who currently carries a .500 OBP.
 
5. Justin Upton, Atlanta
The first splash in Atlanta was the signing of center fielder B.J. Upton. The final splash in Atlanta over the winter was the trade for Justin Upton from the Arizona Diamondbacks. While B.J., fellow outfielder Jason Heyward and other Braves struggled, Justin Upton flourished. He has carried the offense with 12 home runs, 11 of them solo shots.
 
6. Bryce Harper, Washington
Few 20-year-olds are considered among the most indispensable players. For a team bent on winning the World Series, April has not been kind to the Nats. But Harper, bent on being the best player in the game, is hitting .360 while his teammates are scuffling at .225. 
 
7. Mariano Rivera, New York Yankees
It doesn’t matter that the all-time saves leader is 43 years old. It doesn’t matter that he is returning from a torn ACL suffered last May. Somehow the Yankees are in contention despite being decimated with injuries. Getting nine saves from Rivera in April has been huge, but the intangibles he brings may be even more important. 
 
8. Austin Jackson, Detroit
Okay, no one in their right mind would take Jackson over Miguel Cabrera or Prince Fielder. But numbers tell us that it’s Jackson who is the offensive catalyst for the Tigers. When he delivers, they win. 
 
9. Dustin Pedroia, Boston
The mighty mite leads the team offensively, he leads the team on the field and he leads the team in the clubhouse. 
 
10. James Shields, Kansas City
The Kansas City Royals have been grooming top prospects for a few years now. The club has been asking fans to be patient. Believing that this was the year to go for it, the team acquired Shields over the winter to fill the role of ace as well as mentor a staff of young pitchers. To this point, Shields has earned high marks in both areas. Without him, the Royals are not in first place.
 
11. Matt Moore, Tampa Bay
With run production almost non-existence and other starters like 2012 Cy Young winner David Price off their game, Moore has been unhittable. He’s credited with five of the team’s 11 wins. The team has enough pitching and guile to stay in the AL East race, but without Moore, the Rays would be closer to fifth than first.
 
12. Matt Harvey, N.Y. Mets
New York fans are not exactly the most patient. So enduring a rebuilding process is difficult. Difficult for the front office, the players and the fans. So what Harvey has done on the mound — 4-0 with 1.54 ERA, 14 hits, 10 walks and 39 Ks in 35 innings — may not be as important as the lift he’s given fans and the belief he’s instilled in the organization that the future at Citi Field is bright.
 
13. Adam Jones, Baltimore
Chris Davis is off to a torrid start in Baltimore. But Jones is quickly becoming one of the best players in the game and will be in the AL MVP discussion all season. 
 
14. Yoenis Cespedes, Oakland
The second-year slugger has struggled out of the gate to the naked eye, but with him in the lineup the A’s are 10-2. Without him, 4-10.
 
15. Felix Hernandez, Seattle
With King Felix on the hill, the Mariners know they’ll get seven strong innings. What they don’t know is whether they’ll get any runs or not. When they do, they win.
Teaser:
<p> 15 Most Indispensable Players in Baseball</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 14:45
Path: /mlb/15-amazing-mlb-stats-week-april-22-28
Body:

Each week during the 2013 MLB season, we highlight the most important, intriguing and bizarre stats in baseball. 

.516    David Ortiz’s Batting Average
Big Papi is back and the Red Sox are loving it. Already in first place in the AL East, Boston received a lift when Ortiz returned recently. He’s hit safely in all eight games he’s played batting .516 and driving in 11 runs. Dating to last July 2, the slugger has a 20-game hitting streak and is batting .471 during the stretch with a .743 slugging percentage and .558 OBP.

39    Strikeouts by Braves hitters during weekend at Detroit
The Tigers swept the Braves and Detroit pitchers dominated Atlanta hitters. Led by Anibal Sanchez’s 17 whiffs — a single-game franchise record — on Friday night, the Tigers’ pitchers held Atlanta to a .186 average and just five walks in the series.

37:1    Strikeout-to-walk ratio for Adam Wainwright
The Cardinals’ ace set a modern record with 35 strikeouts to start the season before issuing his first walk. Through the week, he had four wins, 37 Ks and just one walk. Not since the dead ball era has a pitcher won 20 games and finished the season with more wins than walks.

.177    Yankees shortstops’ batting average
Just how much do the Yankees miss Derek Jeter? This season Yankee shortstops are batting a combined .177 with just one home run, seven RBIs and seven runs. Last season at the end of April, Jeter was hitting .389 with four homers, 13 RBIs and 16 runs.

12    Homers for the Marlins and Justin Upton
Giancarlo Stanton of the Marlins ended his home run drought over the weekend with a clout on Saturday and two on Sunday. Those were his first homers of the season and tied the Marlins with Justin Upton of the Braves with 12 this season.

.151    Cubs batting average with RISP
There must be something about Chicago this season. The White Sox own the lowest mark in the American League at .188.

9    Saves for Mariano Rivera
With three saves last week, Rivera has nine this season. Only once (2011) in his Hall of Fame career has Rivera had nine saves in April prior to this season. The Sandman just keeps going and going and going.

.143    Combined batting average for Adam LaRoche, Adam Dunn and B.J. Upton
The trio will make a combined $37 million this season. They are currently batting a combined .143 with 11 homers and 24 RBIs. The home run and RBI totals would rank second and fourth in the majors, respectively.

34    At-bats with RISP for Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera
Last season’s American League Triple Crown winner is batting .500 with 23 RBIs in those situations. With two outs and runners in scoring position, his average jumps to .615.

14    At-bats with RISP for Paul Konerko of the White Sox
Like Cabrera, Chicago’s first baseman is batting .500 in those situations, but has just 11 RBIs.

.198    Kansas City cleanup hitters batting average
The Royals are one of the most improved teams in the majors this season. While most teams expect their cleanup hitters to produce runs, especially with the long ball, the Royals are getting very little production. At the end of the week, No. 4 hitters for K.C. were hitting .198 with no home runs and just six RBIs.

0    Home runs by cleanup hitters against Detroit pitchers
Through 24 games, Detroit pitchers have given up 12 home runs, but none of them were hit by opposing cleanup hitters in their 88 at-bats.

5    Home runs for Brandon Crawford
Not Buster Posey or Pablo Sandoval, and not even Hunter Pence was leading the Giants in home runs by week’s end. It was shortstop and No. 8 hitter Brandon Crawford who led the Giants with five homers. Crawford had just seven career homers coming into this season.

1.54    ERA for Matt Harvey
The Mets’ Harvey is 4-0, and lest you think this might have something to do with pitcher-friendly Citi Field, the rest of the Mets’ staff is 6-13 with a 4.88 ERA.

3.14    ERA of the Chicago Cubs rotation
While this speaks well for the Cubs’ starters, their 5-12 record speaks volumes about the Cubs’ anemic offense.

Teaser:
<p> Big Papi returns, Mo Rivera keeps saving games, cleanup hitters are failing and NO. 8 are awaiting. All this and more Amazing Stats this week.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 14:25
Path: /mlb/2013-major-league-baseball-power-rankings-april-30
Body:

Each week during the season Athlon Sports looks at the best and worst baseball teams and players in the league. Here's our MLB Power Rankings and Players of the Week.

 1.  Red Sox—Big Papi is back and hitting better than .500 so far.
 2.  Rangers—11-5 vs. AL West, but don’t face Oakland for another two weeks.
 3.  Braves—Went 3-7 on painful road trip, now four key games with Nats.
 4.  Rockies—Rox get scare with Tulowitzki shoulder injury.
 5.  Giants—No. 8 hitter Brandon Crawford leads team in homers and OPS.
 6.  Yankees—Shortstops sans Derek Jeter are hitting just .177.
 7.  Tigers—Pitching dominated Atlanta in key sweep.
 8.  A’s—Lost eight of 10 vs. AL East.
 9.  Nationals—Jordan Zimmermann becoming new ace.
10.  Diamondbacks—Won all five of Patrick Corbin starts.
11.  Pirates—Took two of three in St. Louis to move into first place.
12.  Royals—Clean-up hitters batting just .198.
13.  Cardinals—Will get two starts from Adam Wainwright this week.
14.  Reds—Shin-Soo Choo has brought a .492 OBP to the leadoff spot.
15.  Orioles—Own three of the top 10 batting averages in the majors.
16.  Dodgers—Big week coming up vs. Rockies and Giants.
17.  Rays—Five of last six losses have been by one run or in extra innings.
18.  Phillies—Spent just two days at .500 this season, can’t rise above.
19.  Brewers—Facing 19 straight games against winning teams.
20.  Twins—Kevin Correia has revitalized his career.
21.  Mets—Matt Harvey is 4-0, 1.54 ERA. Rest of staff: 6-13, 4.88.
22.  Mariners—Tom Wilhelmsen last 10 IP: 3 hits, 0 walks, 0 runs, 8 Ks.
23.  Angels—Easy to blame superstars, but Angels aren’t getting good pitching.
24.  White Sox—Batting .229, scoring less than 3.5 runs/game.
25.  Padres—Starters must get deeper into games.
26.  Cubs—Starters have a 3.14 ERA, but just a 5-12 record.
27.  Indians—Lost eight of last 12.
28.  Blue Jays—Season falling apart eerily similar to Miami in 2012.
29.  Astros—Have Seattle’s number this season.
30.  Marlins—On pace to rank with all-time worst teams.
 
 
AL Player of the Week
David Ortiz, Boston
Big Papi was a welcome sight at Fenway Park last week. The slugger, on the disabled list to begin the season, has hit safely in all games he has appeared including six last week. For the season, he’s batting a robust .516 with six multi-hit games so far. For the week, he hit .478 with a couple of home runs and nine RBIs.
 
AL Pitcher of the Week
Matt Moore, Tampa Bay
The Rays continue to rely on their pitching to keep the club in the race. Moore has been nothing short of spectacular all season. In 14 innings last week, the lefthander gave up five hits and four walks and struck out 18 to win both of his starts.
 
NL Player of the Week
Russell Martin, Pittsburgh
The surging Pirates bolted into first place after winning two of three in St. Louis. The Bucs’ catcher raised his season average last week from .216 to a respectable .267 by batting .375 with four homers.
 
NL Pitcher of the Week
Jeff Locke, Pittsburgh
The young lefthander found his groove last week, tossing 13 shutout innings in road wins over Philadelphia and St. Louis. In 13 innings, he allowed just five hit and four walks. He struck out 10.
Teaser:
<p> 2013 Major League Baseball Power Rankings: April 30</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 10:15
All taxonomy terms: MLB
Path: /mlb/16-amazing-mlb-stats-week-april-15-21
Body:

The Chicago White Sox finally passed Joey Votto in the Walk Chase, but there remain some amazing digits from the Week of April 15-21.

8-of-9    Batters struck out by Greg Holland
After a rough couple of weeks to begin the season, Kansas City closer Greg Holland was absolutely lights out last week. In three appearances, he faced nine batters and struck out eight to notch three saves for the surging Royals.

10    RBIs for Boston’s Mike Napoli
First baseman Mike Napoli is more than earning his $5 million salary so far this season. Last week, he drove home 10 runs in seven games as the Red Sox went 5-2 to move into first place in the AL East. For good measure, Napoli bookended that week with two RBIs on the Sunday before and five ribbies the Monday after for 17 RBIs over a nine-game span from April 14-22. He now leads the AL in RBIs.

6.28    ERA for the Yankees’ fourth and fifth starters
How important are fourth and fifth starters? Presumably a team’s fourth starter will take the mound as many times as its ace. And the No. 5 man only a few less. The Yankees are cruising when CC Sabathia, Andy Pettitte and Hiroki Kuroda take the hill. The trio is a combined 8-3 with a 2.69 ERA. Ivan Nova and Phil Hughes are not pulling their weight just yet. The two are 1-3 with a 6.28 ERA.

.322    Batting average for Baltimore’s first five hitters
Managers expect the top of the lineup to produce runs. They expect the 1-2 hitters to get on base, be able to run and set the table for the run producers at the 3-4-5 spots in the order. The Orioles are meeting all of Buck Showalter’s expectations in that regard. None of the Orioles’ AL East brethren is close to Baltimore’s .322 average. Boston is the next best at .285.

.114    Batting average for Baltimore’s last four hitters
But a successful lineup must have depth. And Baltimore doesn’t. The Orioles are getting very little production from the bottom of the order.

.179    Batting average for Mets cleanup hitters
The Mets’ No. 4 hitters, primarily Ike Davis, are batting just .179. But the news isn’t all bad, the cleanup hitters have produced 12 RBIs, which equates to about 114 over a full season.

27.8    Percent of Dodgers runs scored by Carl Crawford
The former All-Star appears to be returning to form. He’s batting .338 with a .427 OBP and has scored 15 runs (tied for 10th in MLB). His teammates are having trouble touching all the bases. Only the Marlins (43) have scored fewer runs than the Dodgers (54) this season. Just two other players — Austin Jackson of Detroit (23.8) and Desmond Jennings of Tampa Bay (20.5) — have scored more than 20 percent of their teams’ runs.

.232    Pirates batting average
It’s not that the Bucs are the worst hitting team in the majors, there are six teams with lower batting averages. It’s just that, as of the end of the week, the Pirates had outscored their opponents 68-66 in spite of their offensive inadequacies.

4    Hitters below .210
Four Twins with enough qualifying at-bats are hitting below .210. That’s right four. The Braves are the only other team with as many as three below the .210 line and six teams have none. Bottoming out for the Twinkies is rookie Aaron Hicks at .059.

9    Run support for Felix Hernandez – Total
King Felix has toed the rubber for the Mariners four times this season and the offense has produced very little for the ace. Seattle has managed nine runs in the four games. Although Hernandez had a 2.51 ERA, his record stood at 1-2.

.222-2-8    Batting average, home runs, RBIs for Josh Hamilton
The Angels’ right fielder signed a 5-year, $133 million deal over the winter, but has yet to hit his stride with his new team in Anaheim. But let’s wait until May 5 to judge Hamilton too harshly. Last May 4, Albert Pujols’s line looked rather dismal as well at .194-0-5. The Angels were 10-17 at that point last season.

.383/.179    Detroit’s Austin Jackson’s batting averages in the Tigers’ wins and losses
Yes, the Tigers have last season’s Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera, Prince Fielder, who is off to a terrific start this season, and Torii Hunter, who has found happiness to the tune of a .390 batting average, in the lineup. But the Tigers go as their leadoff man goes. In Detroit’s nine wins, Jackson is batting .383 and has scored 15 runs. In the nine losses, he stands at .179 with only four runs.

200    Career wins for Roy Halladay of the Phillies
He joins Andy Pettitte as the only active pitchers with at least 200 wins. But Tim Hudson of the Braves is scheduled to go for No. 200 on Wednesday at Colorado. CC Sabathia of the Yankees is just six wins away from the milestone.

.149    On-base percentage for Jeff Keppinger
 Keppinger has yet to draw a walk this season in 74 plate appearances. With a .153 batting average and two sacrifice flies, Keppinger of the White Sox is the only player of the 189 with enough qualifying at-bats with a higher batting average than OBP.

9    Games the Miami Marlins have plated fewer than two runs
Through 19 games the team is on pace for 77 games with fewer than two runs. The most in a season in the 2000s for any team is 45 by the 2011 San Diego Padres.

7    Players with more home runs than the Marlins
Three of those hitters — Justin Upton, Bryce Harper and John Buck — call the NL East home.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> The Chicago White Sox finally passed Joey Votto in the Walk Chase, but there remain some amazing digits from the Week of April 15-22.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 13:45
All taxonomy terms: MLB
Path: /mlb/baseball%E2%80%99s-best-rookies-each-position
Body:

It’s tough to gauge just which rookies will emerge this season. Some players—like the Rays’ Wil Myers—are expected to become stars, but the Rays haven’t called Myers up from Durham yet. Others, such as Evan Gattis of the Braves, have an excellent opportunity to show what they can do now, but once regular catcher Brian McCann returns from injury, Gattis’ playing time will all but disappear. 

Here are our projections for the best rookie seasons in 2013 at each position.
 
Catcher
Mike Zunino, Seattle
He hasn’t been called up to the big leagues yet, but the Mariners are high on his potential and believe he will be a star for a long time. The 2012 first-round pick batted .360 and slugged .689 last season between Single-A and Double-A. 
Other names to watch: Rob Brantly, Miami; Evan Gattis, Atlanta
 
First Base
Matt Adams, St. Louis
Known as both “Big Country” and “Big City” for some strange reason, Adams won’t get a huge number of at-bats, but Mike Matheny will have him face pitchers he can handle. He’s made just six starts, but has at least two hits in five of them. His early .542 batting average certainly won’t last, but he’ll have respectable numbers at season’s end.
Other name to watch: Mike Olt, Texas
 
Second Base
Jurickson Profar, Texas
At some point, the Rangers will figure out how to get this kid in the lineup every day. With shortstop Elvis Andrus signed long-term, the best option appears to be at second base. As soon as Texas can find another home for Ian Kinsler (perhaps at first base), we will see Profar on a regular basis. The other possibility is that Profar is traded. 
Other name to watch: Jedd Gyorko, San Diego
 
Third Base
Nolan Arenado, Colorado
A strong defender at third base, Arenado is hitting better than .400 through the first few weeks at Triple-A this season. It’s only a matter of time before the future star takes over the hot corner full-time at the big league level.
Other name to watch: Conor Gillaspie, Chicago White Sox
 
Shortstop
Pete Kozma, St. Louis
Since taking over the position late last season after the injury to Rafael Furcal and keeping it through the playoffs, it doesn’t seem like Kozma is still a rookie. But technically, he is. His defense is improving and his even-keel demeanor helps him stay focused offensively as he hit .333 over the last 26 games in 2012.
Other name to watch: Adeiny Hechavarria, Miami
 
Outfield
Wil Myers, Tampa Bay
The Rays haven’t recalled him yet. But remember, the Nats and Angels called up Bryce Harper and Mike Trout for the final weekend of April last season. With Tampa Bay’s offense struggling, Myers may be summoned sooner than that.
 
A.J. Pollock, Arizona
In order to make All-Rookie teams, there must be an opportunity to play. And Pollock is enjoying that in Arizona with fellow rookie Adam Eaton injured. He’s made 14 starts, mostly in center, is batting over .300 and leads the NL with nine doubles.
 
Logan Schafer, Milwaukee
The Brewers are high on this youngster, and manager Ron Roenicke is searching for ways to get him in the lineup. Unlike Pollock, Schafer doesn’t have an immediate opportunity and is currently the fourth outfielder.
Other names to watch: Jackie Bradley Jr., Boston; Billy Hamilton, Cincinnati; Aaron Hicks, Minnesota
 
Starting Pitchers
Jose Fernandez, Miami
There isn’t much positive baseball news coming out of South Florida this season, but Fernandez will be an exception. The Marlins just hope they can give him enough run support to keep him enthused. In 11 innings over his first two starts he allowed just one run, yet got no wins.
 
Shelby Miller, St. Louis
With Chris Carpenter’s injury woes, Miller has become an integral part of the Cardinals’ rotation. And this for an organization that expects to compete in the playoffs every year. So far this season he’s allowed 11 hits, five walks and has 18 punchouts.
 
Hyun-Jin Ryu, L.A. Dodgers
The Dodgers forked over a $25.7 million posting fee and another $36 million to sign the Korean pitcher. With Zack Greinke out, the Dodgers will ask Ryu to do some heavy lifting.
 
Dylan Bundy, Baltimore
Whether in contention or not, the Orioles could use another starter down the stretch. Expect to see Bundy in the second half.
 
Tony Cingrani, Cincinnati
Before his recent call-up, the 23-year-old lefty had a 0.349 WHIP and 14.1 shutout innings over three starts at Louisville.
Other names to watch: Brendan Maurer, Seattle; Jake Odorizzi, Tampa Bay; Brad Peacock, Houston; Wily Peralta, Milwaukee;
Julio Teheran, Atlanta
 
Closer
Jim Henderson, Milwaukee
The Brewers’ bullpen has been a mess. Ron Roenicke will take a committee approach for now, but eventually, Henderson will settle in as closer.
Other names to watch: Paco Rodriguez, Los Angeles Dodgers; Bruce Rondon, Detroit; Justin Wilson, Pittsburgh
Teaser:
<p> Baseball’s Best Rookies at Each Position</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 - 13:30
All taxonomy terms: MLB
Path: /mlb/10-amazing-mlb-stats-week-april-8-14
Body:

Just two weeks into the season, the sample size is small, but it’s fun to dissect a few notable numbers from the early going. Here are a few from the week of April 8-14.

20    Walks for Joey Votto
The former MVP of the Reds is on pace for 270 walks this season. He has drawn a walk in every game this season save one. In that lone game, he was 3-for-4. But we know that 12 games is a small sample size, and at some point NL pitchers will find a way to pitch to him. Perhaps even more remarkable than Votto’s 20 walks is that the entire White Sox team has but 16. I guess patience at the plate isn’t such a virtue on the South Side of Chicago.

1.82    ERA for the Atlanta Braves
At the end of two weeks, the Atlanta pitching staff has been downright filthy, clearly the main reason the Braves are off to such a hot start. With an ERA of 1.82, the Braves are so much better than the season’s standard. Only three other teams have an ERA below 3.00.

0    Home runs hit last week by teams from Florida
The Tampa Bay Rays have just five home runs on the season, and didn’t go yard last week as they went 1-4 with one rainout (thankfully). It wasn’t any better in South Florida. The Marlins scored just six runs in six games against the Braves and Phillies, winning one and losing five.

2.78    ERA for Miami starting pitchers
Just how bad is the run support in Miami? Bad enough that a few starters may need to be put on suicide watch. The rotation has a respectable combined ERA of 2.78. Their won-loss record is a combined 1-6.

20.1    Paul Maholm scoreless innings
Prior to this season, Paul Maholm owned a 66-84 record in 216 career starts and a 4.26 ERA, primarily with the Pirates. He has averaged 9.6 hits per nine innings and 5.7 strikeouts. This season he has yet to allow a run in 20.1 innings and has found a strikeout pitch. He’s whiffing batters at a rate of 8.9 per nine innings and allowing just 4.9 hits. The lefthander ended the week with 14.2 shutout innings over the Braves’ division rivals Miami and Washington, both games on the road.

39    Scoreless innings for St. Louis pitchers
The St. Louis Cardinals’ pitching staff recently put together a streak of 39 scoreless innings. A stretch that included a shutout over division favorite Cincinnati and two whitewashes of Milwaukee.

33    Scoreless innings for Milwaukee hitters
Ryan Braun broke the string with a two-run homer off of St. Louis reliever Trevor Rosenthal, a clout that also ended the Cardinals’ scoreless streak.

6.09    Bullpen ERA in St. Louis
Just how badly do the Cardinals miss closer Jason Motte? The reliever is out with an elbow injury that could require Tommy John surgery and the shakeup in the St. Louis bullpen hasn’t yielded great results. The starters are certainly carrying their load with a 1.82 ERA and a combined 7-2 record as of Sunday. The bullpen? Well, that’s been sketchy. Relievers have combined for a 6.09 ERA, three losses, no wins and four blown saves in six opportunities.

1.67    Home ERA for Colorado pitchers
It seems that it may not be too tough to pitch in the thin air of Denver after all. Or maybe it has to do with cold — dare we say, frigid — air. It’s a small sample, but in 27 innings at Coors Field, the Colorado staff has allowed just 24 hits and five earned runs. Jhoulys Chacin, Jeff Francis and Jon Garland all chipped in with a quality start and the bullpen allowed just one run in 8.1 innings. On the road, they seem to be more themselves with a 4.92 ERA.

.632    Prince Fielder’s batting average for the week
The hottest hitter in the majors over the past week collected 12 knocks in six games, leading the majors with 11 RBIs over that span. He batted .632 with nine walks and just two whiffs. He finished the week with a .527 OBP and .833 slugging percentage.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

Teaser:
<p> Just two weeks into the season, the sample size is small, but it’s fun to dissect a few notable numbers from the early going. Here are a few from the week of April 8-14.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 - 11:15
All taxonomy terms: Jackie Robinson, MLB
Path: /mlb/look-back-jackie-robinson-and-baseball%E2%80%99s-slow-integration
Body:

Today, MLB celebrates Jackie Robinson Day, honoring the man who broke baseball's color barrier amid tough circumstances in 1947. Perhaps no other man had such a far-reaching effect on the game, and especially future players. But Robinson’s influential life stretched far beyond the game of baseball.

And while Robinson was the first, there were others who came closely behind. Men who endured insults, humiliation and ridicule as well as Robinson, but persevered so that other players previously denied the opportunity to play in the major leagues could enjoy that privilege.

There were few signs in 1947 that this “experiment” by Dodgers owner Branch Rickey would not be a success. So why did it take other teams so long to catch on?

After Robinson had played three complete seasons, just four of the 16 major league teams were integrated. When Robinson was a seven-year veteran, only half of the major league teams had followed the Dodgers’ lead.

Robinson retired after a 10-year career at the end of 1956, and the Philadelphia Phillies, Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox had yet to enlist a player of color at the major league level. It wasn’t until midseason 1959—12 years after Robinson’s debut, and more than two years after his retirement—that Pumpsie Green took the field for the Boston Red Sox, the last team to hold out.

Every April 15, MLB reminds us of some dark times in our nation’s history. But after the heroic stances by Robinson and others, the game—and our country—are much better.

How Each Team Integrated

Jackie Robinson—Brooklyn Dodgers, NLApril 15, 1947

The multi-sport star out of UCLA played first base and hit second for the Dodgers. In his debut, he scored the go-ahead run in the Brooklyn’s 5-3 win over the Boston Braves.

Larry DobyCleveland Indians, ALJuly 5, 1947

The Hall of Famer struck out as a pinch-hitter at Chicago in his first appearance. Unlike, Robinson, Doby didn’t make a single start in the 29 games of his first season in 1947. 

Hank Thompson—St. Louis Browns, AL—July 17, 1947; New York Giants, NL—July 8, 1949

Was 0-4 with an error at second base in his debut with St. Louis. Two years later, he became the first African-American to play for the Giants leading off in the same game that Monte Irvin pinch-hit.

Monte Irvin—New York Giants, NL—July 8, 1949

Drew a walk as a pinch-hitter in his first game, struck out as a pinch-hitter in his second game.

Sam Jethroe—Boston Braves, NL—April 18, 1950

Whiffed in his first at-bat, but later drove in the go-ahead run and homered in his debut, a game in which Hank Thompson of the Giants also went deep.

Minnie Minoso—Chicago White Sox, AL—May 1, 1951

The Cuban Comet made his debut with Cleveland in 1949 and was traded to the White Sox after eight games in 1951. He was 2-4 in each of his first two games with the Sox.  

Bob Trice—Philadelphia Athletics, AL—September 13, 1953

Threw eight innings and didn’t walk anyone, but gave up five runs on eight hits including two homers in the loss to St. Louis. Don Larsen earned the win and took Trice deep in the eighth inning.

Ernie Banks—Chicago Cubs, NL—September 17, 1953

Mr. Cub went hitless and made an error in his debut, but drove in two runs in a win over the Cardinals in the next game. Soon became an all-time favorite in Chicago sports.

Curt Roberts—Pittsburgh Pirates, NL—April 13, 1954

The second baseman tripled off Robin Roberts in his first at-bat. Fluent in Spanish, he is credited with helping Roberto Clemente adjust to life in the majors.

Tom Alston—St. Louis Cardinals, NL—April 13, 1954

Thomas Edison Alston appeared in 66 games for St. Louis in 1954, but just 25 games total over the next three seasons. He was hitless in four trips in his debut.

Nino Escalera—Cincinnati Reds, NL—April 17, 1954

The Puerto Rican singled as a pinch-hitter one batter before Chuck Harmon was called on to bat for the pitcher.

Chuck Harmon—Cincinnati Reds, NL—April 17, 1954

Popped out to first in his debut, but played in 289 major league games, mostly at third base.

Carlos Paula—Washington Senators, AL—September 6, 1954

Struck out in his first at-bat, but doubled in a pair of runs his next time up.

Elston Howard—New York Yankees, AL—April 14, 1955

Howard entered the second game of the season in left field late in the game and singled home Mickey Mantle in his first at-bat. The 1963 AL MVP averaged .296-17-74 from 1958-64 and earned two Gold Gloves.

John Kennedy—Philadelphia Phillies, NL—April 22, 1957

Kennedy pinch-ran for Solly Hemus in his debut. The shortstop played in just five games in the majors, three of them as a pinch-runner.

Ozzie Virgil, Sr.—Detroit Tigers, AL—June 6, 1958

After debuting with the Giants in 1956, Virgil was traded to Detroit in January 1958. He was called up from the minors and was the regular third baseman for a couple of months. He hit safely in his first eight games with the Tigers.

Pumpsie Green—Boston Red Sox, AL—July 21, 1959

Pinch-ran for Vic Wertz in the eighth inning of his debut, finishing the game at shortstop. He had no chances in the field and was on deck when the game ended. He started at second the following day and essentially became the regular second baseman for the remainder of the season.

Teaser:
<p> Celebrating Jackie Robinson Day</p>
Post date: Monday, April 15, 2013 - 13:35
Path: /mlb/14-amazing-mlb-stats-week-march-31-april-7
Body:

Baseball is a numbers game. Always has been. Always will be. And here are a few notable numbers for the opening week of the season: March 31-April 7.

15    Earned runs allowed last Sunday by reigning Cy Young winners
David Price and R.A. Dickey dominated last season and won the 2012 Cy Young awards. Neither was himself last Sunday though. After teammates Alex Cobb and Matt Moore shut down the Indians the two previous games, the Tribe took it out on Price. The lefthander lasted just five innings and surrendered 10 hits and three walks while giving up eight runs. Dickey’s story is similar in that the team he faced was shut out the day before as well. J.A. Happ and three relievers shut out Boston, but Dickey’s knuckler was doing very little dancing on Sunday. He gave up eight runs — seven earned — on 10 hits and two walks before he was lifted with two out in the fifth.

17    RBIs for Baltimore’s Chris Davis
It took the Baltimore DH just four games to reach 17 ribbies. Last season, the first player to drive in that many was Andre Ethier, who reached the mark on April 17 in the Dodgers’ 11th game. His teammate, Matt Kemp, drove in his 17th the following day. Nick Swisher was the first in the American League with 17 RBIs last season. He did so on April 21 in the Yankees’ 15 contest. Josh Hamilton, then of the Rangers, was the only other player to drive in 17 in his team’s first 17 games.

.099    Batting average for the Pittsburgh Pirates infield
First baseman Gaby Sanchez (.063), second baseman Neil Walker (.100), third baseman Pedro Alvarez (.091) and Clint Barmes (.154) are a combined 7-for-71 with three RBIs and only two extra-base hits, both doubles by Barmes. As a team, the Pirates ended the week batting .119 with one home run. They scored just eight runs in their first six games. No wonder why they finished the week 1-5.

69    Win/save combinations for Andy Pettitte and Mariano Rivera
The two 40-somethings have been toiling in pinstripes for what seems like forever. Actually, it goes back only to 1996 when Mo’s first career save was a win for starter Pettitte. The total of 69 is the most all-time and does not include the 11 postseason win/save combinations for the pair of likely Hall of Famers.

14.05    Combined ERA for five aces last Sunday
It wasn’t just the reigning Cy Young winners who were knocked around last Sunday. In addition to David Price and R.A. Dickey, Matt Cain, Stephen Strasburg and Cole Hamels struggled as well. The quintet allowed 38 earned runs in just 24.1 innings.

26    Consecutive batters retired by Yu Darvish
Darvish, the emerging ace of the Texas Rangers mowed through the Houston lineup for eight innings before allowing a hit to shortstop Marwin Gonzalez to fall one batter short of a perfect game.

16    Scoreless innings by the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw
While some aces were getting beaten up in their second starts, Kershaw picked up where he left off on Opening Day. In the opener, Kershaw tossed a complete game shutout over San Francisco and helped himself with a home run in the eighth inning to break a scoreless tie. For an encore, he threw seven shutout frames in a win against Pittsburgh.

0-17    Dodgers infielder Luis Cruz goes 0-for-the week
Luis Cruz, filling in for the injured Hanley Ramirez, struggled through a forgettable week. Of the 204 players with enough qualifying plate appearances, Cruz is the only one hitless. He walked once and whiffed four times.

.500    Batting average for Jed Lowrie
The sandwich-round pick of the Boston Red Sox (45th overall) in 2005 was traded to Houston along with Kyle Weiland for Mark Melancon prior to last season. This spring, he was dealt to Oakland with Fernando Rodriguez for Max Stassi, Chis Carter and Brad Peacock. The Oakland shortstop has reached safely in all seven games for the A’s with three three-hit games and a 1.000 slugging percentage.

12    Players with 12 (or more) consecutive Opening Day starts
Most fans could get pretty close to naming the dozen players with a dozen straight starts to open the season. Todd Helton leads the list with 16. Torii Hunter has made 15 straight OD starts with Minnesota, the Angels and this season with the Tigers. Aramis Ramirez, primarily with the Cubs but dating to his days in Pittsburgh, has 14 straight. Paul Konerko, A.J. Pierzynski, Placido Polanco, Albert Pujols and Jimmy Rollins have 13 in a row. Adrian Beltre, Adam Dunn, Alfonso Soriano and — perhaps the most surprising — Vernon Wells have 12 each.

16    Consecutive Opening Day starts by Todd Helton
The Rockies’ first baseman has indicated that 2013 would be his final season. He carries the longest consecutive Opening Day starting streak at 16. Amazingly, he and Andres Galarraga are the only two players in history to start at first base for Colorado on Opening Day.

27    All-Star appearances among current Tigers
All 10 players in Detroit’s Opening Day lineup claim at least one All-Star honor. Led by Miguel Cabrera’s seven and Justin Verlander’s five, the Tigers’ opening lineup totals 27 All-Star appearances, the most of any team’s Opening Day lineup.

10    All-Star appearances by Ichiro
New York Yankees right fielder Ichiro Suzuki is the only player who started Opening Day for any team with 10 All-Star Games to his credit. All 10 appearances were made wearing a Seattle uniform.

+2    Games over .500 for the AL Central
Only one division in the American League played winning baseball during the season’s first week — and it wasn’t the vaunted AL East. The AL Central finished four games over the breakeven mark with the other two divisions each two games under.

Teaser:
<p> Baseball is a numbers game. Always has been. Always will be. And here are a few notable stats for the opening week of the season: March 31-April 7.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 9, 2013 - 11:45
Path: /mlb/predicting-baseball%E2%80%99s-2016-all-star-teams
Body:

Now that baseball is back in full swing, we started thinking about the future. And there’s nothing more fun than projecting where today’s baseball stars will be playing three years from now, and predicting who the best players in each league will be. So here goes. The 2016 All-Star teams.

American League
Starters

CF—Mike Trout—Los Angeles
The game’s brightest superstar is the leading vote-getter.

SS—Jose Reyes—Toronto
The newest wave of young shortstops hasn’t overtaken Reyes just yet.

RF—Adam Jones—Baltimore
With Baltimore the likely host of the 2016 game, Jones will receive the loudest ovation.

DH—Miguel Cabrera—Detroit
The old vet is still punishing pitchers.

3B—Evan Longoria—Tampa Bay
Longoria wins the closest vote in years, edging Robinson Cano who has just made the switch to third base.

1B—Prince Fielder—Detroit
Prince edges King Albert who is showing serious signs of decline.

C—Sal Perez—Kansas City
Defensively and offensively, the best catcher in the AL.

LF—Austin Jackson—Detroit
It's taken a while, but Jackson makes his first All-Star start.

2B—Jurickson Profar—Texas
Yes, Profar really is that good.

SP—David Price—Tampa Bay
The leap here is that Price is still pitching for the Rays in 2016. The assumption is that he and Longoria help usher in a new stadium that year.

Reserves

C—Joe Mauer—Minnesota
Managers always seem to pick an old vet as a lifetime achievement award.

C—Mike Zunino—Seattle
The rising star will soon be a perennial All-Star.

1B—Albert Pujols—Los Angeles
Still a machine, just not quite as efficient.

2B—Jose Altuve—Houston
The Astros must have a representative and Altuve cost Elvis Andrus a spot.

2B—Dustin Pedroia—Boston
The lone Red Sox is deserving in his own right.

3B—Robinson Cano—New York
He’s still getting used to third defensively, but his bat never takes a day off.

SS—Asdrubal Cabrera—Cleveland
Although Cleveland has toyed with moving him to second, he can still pick it at short and is surprisingly the lone Indian.

SS—Addison Russell—Oakland
Manny Machado and Alcides Escobar were shunned in favor of the second-year player.

OF—Wil Myers—Tampa Bay
Myers has given Tampa Bay fans — all 23,000 of them — a reason to cheer for three and half years now.

OF—Bubba Starling—Kansas City
Even after a stellar rookie season, Starling occasionally appears overmatched.

OF—Aaron Hicks—Minnesota
Twins fans most favorite player since Kirby Puckett.

OF—Yoenis Cespedes—Oakland
No longer sees much time in the outfield, but one of the most feared hitters in the league.

OF—Alex Gordon—Kansas City
Fans in K.C. believe teammate Billy Butler was a better choice.

OF—Mason Williams—New York
The youngster has taken New York by storm.

P—Yu Darvish—Texas
The Rangers’ ace led the AL in wins in 2015.

P—Felix Hernandez—Seattle
King Felix cruising toward 200 career wins.

P—Brett Anderson—Oakland
Anderson is one of the few players who missed the old stadium in Oakland. The new park is not nearly as pitcher-friendly.

P—Justin Verlander—Detroit
He doesn’t hit triple digits in the ninth inning any longer, but hitters still ask for a day off when he pitches.

P—Chris Sale—Chicago
After two years of struggling with injuries, Sale is back in ace form.

P—Dylan Bundy—Baltimore
Baltimore fans would love to see Bundy start the game.

P—Andre Rienzo—Chicago
The Brazilian is quickly becoming an ace in Chicago.

P—Addison Reed—Chicago
Best closer in the AL.

P—Taylor Guerrieri—Tampa Bay
Devastating curveball keeps hitters off balance.

P—David Robertson—New York
He’s very good, but he’s also following the legendary Mo Rivera. Not an enviable situation.
 

National League
Starters

RF—Bryce Harper—Washington
Introducing the leading vote getter in the NL, second only to Mike Trout of the Angels.

CF—Andrew McCutchen—Pittsburgh
The anchor of the Pirates lineup will have finally led the club to a winning record by 2016.

1B—Joey Votto—Cincinnati
Another batting title and MVP trophy would be good guesses for the face of the Reds.

LF—Ryan Braun—Milwaukee
Still one of the premier hitters in the NL.

C—Buster Posey—San Francisco
The only question will be how many MVPs Posey will have by the 2016 game.

DH—Giancarlo Stanton—Miami
Okay, so the chances of Stanton still residing in Miami in 2016 are slim, but he’ll be a good option for the manager’s choice for DH anyway.

3B—David Wright—New York
Anthony Rendon’s numbers will overshadow Wright’s, but the fans will vote for the New York veteran one more season to give him the start.

2B—Brandon Phillips—Cincinnati
With few choices at the position, the veteran wins the fans vote.

SS—Juan Segura—Milwaukee
With no real stars at the position, fans have begun to fall in love with Segura in Milwaukee.

SP—Stephen Strasburg—Washington
No manager can resist calling on Strasburg to start the game now that there are no innings limit for the kid.

Reserves

C—Yadier Molina—St. Louis
The Cardinals backstop makes his final appearance in an All-Star Game.

C—Miguel Montero—Arizona
Without Posey in the league, Montero may have an All-Star start or two by then.

1B—Nolan Arenado—Colorado
The rising star in Colorado moves from third to first for 2016.

1B—Paul Goldschmidt—Arizona
His power and average will steadily rise every season for the next several years.

1B—Allen Craig—St. Louis
The hitting machine can’t seem to stay healthy enough to become the premier first baseman in the NL.

2B—Starlin Castro—Chicago
Moved off of short by Javier Baez, Castro will struggle at third before finding a home at second.

3B—Anthony Rendon—Washington
Ryan Zimmerman was moved to first base to accommodate Rendon who quickly becomes the best third baseman in the league.

SS—Zack Cozart—Cincinnati
Controversy: The NL manager shuns Andrelton Simmons of the Braves in favor of Cozart. (Obviously Tony La Russa has not returned.)

OF—Jedd Gyorko—San Diego
Youngster Christian Yelich of Miami may have a better argument, but the Padres must be represented.

OF—Justin Upton—Atlanta
Justin upstages his brother in Atlanta.

OF—Carlos Gonzalez—Colorado
The veteran Rockie is still putting up big numbers at Coors Field.

OF—Jason Heyward—Atlanta
Two-thirds of the Braves outfield will be represented.

OF—Oscar Tavares—St. Louis
The brightest rising star in the NL makes the team, but doesn’t get in the game.

P—Matt Cain—San Francisco
Cain is the unquestioned leader of the best staff in the NL.

P—Madison Bumgarner—San Francisco
The lefty is part of one of the best 1-2 punches in baseball.

P—Clayton Kershaw—Los Angeles
Now completely over a hip injury, Kershaw remains a Cy Young candidate.

P—Tyler Skaggs—Arizona
Many fans would argue that Skaggs has better numbers than Strasburg and deserved to start. But his time will come.

P—Adam Wainwright—St. Louis
There are maybe four or five pitchers that deserve this spot, but the manager’s choice is the veteran from St. Louis.

P—Shelby Miller—St. Louis
The new ace of the Cardinals.

P—Cole Hamels—Philadelphia
The Phillies have turned into an old, mediocre team, but Hamels is still nasty.

P—Zack Wheeler—New York
Fruits of the Mets rebuilding project are fully mature.

P—Craig Kimbrel—Atlanta
Still the best closer in the league. His career may rival Mariano Rivera’s without the postseason glory, of course.

P—Aroldis Chapman—Cincinnati
We see him as an All-Star whether starting or finishing.

P—Drew Storen—Washington
He piles up saves and his resume looks good at All-Star time.

 

Teaser:
<p> Look into our MLB crystal ball.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, April 3, 2013 - 13:40
All taxonomy terms: MLB, Overtime, News
Path: /mlb/50-greatest-nicknames-baseball-history
Body:

Nicknames and baseball players just seem to go together like bat and ball. For as long as young boys and men have been batting baseballs around, they have given each other descriptive nicknames for facial features, deformed body parts, the way they played the game, hair color and, the most popular, shortening their surnames. In fact, some players with nicknames were given nicknames for their nicknames. 

Here are the 50 best—and often very politically incorrect—nicknames in baseball history.

50. Don Mossi
Ears
 (
also The Sphinx)
Perhaps you had to see Mossi to really appreciate the name. In Ball Four, Jim Bouton said Mossi “looked like a cab going down the street with its doors open.”

49. Ernie Lombardi
Schnozz

Not to allow Mossi and his ears steal all the thunder, the catcher who was also known as the world’s slowest human had a beak of monumental proportions. But the catcher hit his way into the Hall of Fame.

48. Nick Cullop
Tomato Face

Cullop spent 23 years in the minors, hit 420 home runs and had 2,670 hits, both minor league records when he retired.

47. Mordecai Peter Centennial Brown
Three Finger

Known more commonly as Three Finger Brown than by Mordecai, Brown capitalized on losing most of his index finger in a childhood farming accident. Apparently that helped him throw a devastating curveball described by Ty Cobb as the toughest in baseball.

46. Don Zimmer
The Gerbil

Despite the success for the Red Sox in the late 1970s, Zim is blamed for the team’s collapse in 1978, ultimately losing a playoff game at Fenway Park (commonly known as the Bucky Dent game). Because of this, lefthander Bill Lee, with whom Zimmer often sparred, gave him the name Gerbil.

45. Bill Lee
Spaceman

And speaking of Lee, it wasn’t as though he was a mental giant himself. The lefthander’s outrageous, often irreverent personality and his fearless rhetoric earned him the name Spaceman, allegedly, from John Kennedy (the Red Sox utility infielder, not the former President). Just being left-handed in Boston was probably enough.

44. Jim Grant
Mudcat

Grant, who became one of the most successful African-American pitchers in the 1960s, was the roommate of his boyhood idol Larry Doby when he first came to Cleveland. It was the veteran Doby who dubbed him “Mudcat”, saying that he was “ugly as a Mississippi mudcat.”

43. Jim Hunter
Catfish

Oakland A’s owner Charlie Finely often seemed more interested in flashy P.R. than winning baseball games. Evidently, this nickname was a product of the PR-conscious Finley more than any angling the Hall of Fame pitcher might have done in his home state of North Carolina.

42. Randy Johnson
Big Unit

Okay, get your mind out of the gutter. Former Expos teammate — yes, Johnson was originally a member of the Expos — Tim Raines once collided with him during batting practice, looked up at the 6’10” hurler and proclaimed, “You’re a big unit.”

41. Mark Fidrych
The Bird

The affable righthander enjoyed talking to the baseball while on the mound and manicuring the mound on his hands and knees between innings. But it was because of his resemblance to Big Bird of Sesame Street fame that Fidrych was given his name.

40. Marc Rzepczynski
Scrabble

Some surnames scream for nicknames, like Yastrzemski with Yaz, and Mazeroski with Maz. But there are few names that could earn more points in the famous word game than this lefthander’s.

39. Doug Gwosdz
Eye-chart

Ancestors of the former catcher of the San Diego Padres must have misspelled this name somewhere down the line. But as astute teammates surmised, his jersey resembled those charts hanging on walls in optometrists’ offices.

38. Johnny Dickshot
Ugly

First of all, that is his real name. And secondly, he referred to himself as the “ugliest man in baseball.” So, we have no qualms about Dickshot making the list.

37. Luke Appling
Old Aches and Pains

Dubbed by teammates, it’s unclear whether the name was given in jest. But it is clear that Appling didn’t mind complaining about the physical demands of the job all the way to the Hall of Fame.

36. Roger Bresnahan
The Duke of Tralee

Nothing really unusual about this name; after all many players were named in honor of their hometowns. Earl Averill was the Duke of Snohomish after his hometown in Washington. But, Bresnahan was from Toledo. For some reason he enjoyed telling folks he was born in Tralee, Ireland.

35. Bob Feller
Rapid Robert

Taking the American League by storm as a teenager led to this nickname as well as The Heater from Van Meter (Iowa).

34. Edward Charles Ford
The Chairman of the Board

Well known as Whitey because of hair color, the lefty dominated the American League for 16 seasons as a member of the Yankees. As a tribute to his calm, cool demeanor in tough situations, he became known as the Chairman of the Board.

33. Leon Allen Goslin
Goose

Several sources agree on how Goslin acquired his name. Evidently, he waved his arms as he chased fly balls, had a long neck, and was not the most graceful player.

32. Willie Mays
Say Hey Kid

There is no definitive agreement on how Mays acquired this classic name.

31. Mickey Mantle
The Commerce Comet

Mantle, a star athlete from Commerce, Oklahoma, was offered a football scholarship by the University of Oklahoma, but wisely chose baseball.

30. Joe Medwick
Ducky-Wucky
(also Muscles)
According to Baseball-Reference.com, fans called Medwick Ducky-Wucky more than merely Ducky, presumably because of his gait, or perhaps the way he swam. Teammates, seemingly out of self-preservation, never called him Ducky-Wucky, but chose instead the name, Muscles.

29. Brooks Robinson
Vacuum Cleaner

If you ever saw Brooksie do his work around the hot corner, you would quickly understand the moniker. Teammate Lee May once quipped, “Very nice (play)...where do they plug Mr. Hoover in?”

28. Aloysius Harry Simmons
Bucketfoot Al

With an exaggerated stride toward third base. Bucketfoot Al bashed major league pitching at a .334 clip on his way to the Hall of Fame.

27. Lynn Nolan Ryan
Ryan Express

No one readily admits giving him the name, but any hitter who stood in the box against Ryan is keenly aware of what the name means.

26. Darrell Evans
Howdy Doody

One look at the famous puppet and a glance at the power-hitting lefty, and you’ll know why.

25. Dennis Boyd
Oil Can

Born in Mississippi (where beer may be referred to as oil), the colorful righthander carried the nickname on to the major leagues.

24. Johnny Lee Odom
Blue Moon

Reportedly, a classmate in grade school thought Odom’s face looked like the moon. Really?

23. Frank Thomas
Big Hurt

Given to Thomas by White Sox broadcaster Ken Harrelson. Thomas put the big hurt on American League pitching for 19 years.

22. Garry Maddox
Minister of Defense

If you watched Maddox patrol center field for the Phillies in the 1970s, you immediately get the name.

21. Mike Hargrove
Human Rain Delay

And you think Nomar Garciaparra invented the step-out-of-the-box-and-adjust-your-batting-gloves routine. Nope. Seasons changed between pitches when he was at bat.

20. Daniel Joseph Staub
Le Grand Orange

Known as Rusty by the Texans while with the Colt .45s, he became Le Grand Orange in Montreal as a member of the original Expos.

19. Jimmy Wynn
Toy Cannon

His small stature and powerful bat led to this moniker.

18. Steve Balboni
Bye-Bye

Presumably, Balboni was given the name because of his propensity to hit home runs. It may also be noted that a double meaning could be bye-bye, as in “He gone” back to the dugout because of his propensity to strike out.

17. Joakim Soria
The Mexicutioner

When the Royals’ closer took the mound, it was usually lights out for the opponent’s offense. He has since requested another, less violent name.

16. Frank Howard
The Capital Punisher

While playing in the nation’s capital, Howard punished AL pitching for 237 home runs in seven seasons, twice leading the league with 44, and finishing second in 1969 with 48.

15. Carl Pavano
American Idle

After signing a four-year, $38 million deal with the Yankees prior to the 2005 season, Pavano made just nine starts in four seasons, going 3-3 with a 5.00 ERA.

14. Lawrence Peter Berra
Yogi

Evidently when Berra sat with arms and legs crossed a friend suggested he looked like a Hindu yogi. Now the term Yogi is associated with malaprops more than Hindu.

13. Mariano Rivera
The Sandman

Good night batters.

12. Rickey Henderson
Man of Steal

One look at his stats and you understand this one: 1,406 career steals and a record 130 in 1982.

11. Shane Victorino
The Flyin’ Hawaiian

Victorino plays the game with endless energy and spunk, but his heritage rules the day.

10. Vince Coleman
Vincent Van Go

A true artist of the stolen base.

9. Ken Reitz
Zamboni

Cardinals broadcaster Mike Shannon marveled at how the St. Louis third baseman could pick up everything.

8. Pablo Sandoval
Kung Fu Panda

The loveable Giant Panda.

7. Fred McGriff
Crime Dog

One of ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman’s nicknames that actually stuck. Thanks McGruff, the cartoon Crime Dog.

6. Kenny Rogers
The Gambler

“Every hand’s a winner, and every hand’s a loser. The best that you can hope for is to die in your sleep.”

5. Jose Bautista
Joey Bats

Bautista was terrific as Joey Bats in “The Hitman” on YouTube. He’s been even better as himself for the Blue Jays.

4. Harry Davis
Stinky

Poor Davis lost his job as Detroit first baseman to some kid name Hank Greenberg in 1933.

3. Ron Cey
The Penguin

Playing for Tommy Lasorda in the minor leagues must have had its pros and cons. Having your manager dub you Penguin because of your awkward running style would probably fall on the con side.

2. William Ellsworth Hoy
Dummy Hoy

As if anyone needed reminding, here’s a clear indicator of just how far political correctness has come in 100 years. William Ellsworth Hoy lost his hearing and ability to speak as a result of childhood meningitis. At only 5’4”, he was difficult to strike out and was the first player to hit a grand slam in the American League. He died in 1961, just five months shy of his 100th birthday.

1. George Herman Ruth
Babe 
(also the Bambino, Sultan of Swat, The King of Sting, The Colossus of Clout)

Babe was the only major leaguer large enough for five larger than life nicknames.

Teaser:
<p> From Ears to Babe, here are our 50 favorite</p>
Post date: Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - 07:00
All taxonomy terms: MLB, News
Path: /mlb/baseball-numbers-2013-opening-day-edition
Body:

The 2013 Major League Baseball season kicks off on Sunday night with the Astros taking on the Rangers. Before the first pitch, here are 101 stats to know for the 2013 season.

101 Stats to Kick Off the 2013 Major League Baseball Season

0
Players elected by the BBWAA for Hall of Fame induction in 1950, as was the case in 2013. There were 48 players on the ballot in 1950 that would eventually gain election to the Hall.

1
Number of times a team has overcome a 3-games-to-0 deficit to win a postseason series. The Boston Red Sox mounted the historical comeback over the New York Yankees in the 2004 ALCS.

2
Hits by Joel Youngblood off two Hall of Fame pitchers (Fergie Jenkins and Steve Carlton) for two teams (Montreal Expos and New York Mets) in two cities (Chicago and Philadelphia) in the same day. On August 4, 1982, Youngblood started in center field and batting third for the Mets at Chicago in an afternoon game and singled in two runs in the third inning off Jenkins. He was replaced by Mookie Wilson in center in the middle of the fourth inning when it was learned he had been traded to the Montreal Expos. He hopped a flight to Philadelphia and arrived during the game. He was inserted in right field for Jerry White in the sixth inning and caught a fly ball to end the inning. In the top of the seventh, he singled off Carlton. The well-traveled Youngblood was on deck when the game ended with the Phillies ahead 5-4.

3
The number worn on the back of Babe Ruth’s uniform. The Yankees introduced uniform numbers in 1929.

4
Consecutive MVP awards won by Barry Bonds from 2001-04, becoming the only player to win more than two in a row.

5
Members of the original Hall of Fame class in 1936. Ty Cobb received the most votes (222), followed by a tie between Honus Wagner and Babe Ruth (215). Christy Mathewson (205) and Walter Johnson (189) were the two pitchers elected. Cy Young was named on just 49.1 percent of the ballots, Lou Gehrig 22.6 percent and Jimmie Foxx 9.3 percent.

6
Stan the Man Musial made this number famous in St. Louis. Among his many gaudy stats, are 1,815 hits on the road and 1,815 hits at home.

7
Modern record for hits in a nine-inning game. Rennie Stennett of the Pirates pasted Cubs pitching for seven safeties on Sept. 16, 1975 at Wrigley Field. The Pirates’ leadoff hitter had four singles, two doubles and a triple in the Pirates’ 22-0 thrashing in Chicago. After Stennett’s eighth-inning triple, future New York Yankees All-Star Willie Randolph pinch-ran for him. Stennett led off the game with a double off of Rick Reuschel and ended his day with a triple off of Paul Reuschel.

8
Different pitchers to lead the Rays in saves over the past eight seasons. With Fernando Rodney back this season, the string is likely to be broken.

9
Players sent to the plate in the 1976 World Series by Reds manager Sparky Anderson. With the DH used for every game that year, Anderson used the same lineup for all four games and used no pinch-hitters in the Reds’ sweep of the Yankees.

10
John Tudor in 1985 was the last pitcher to throw 10 shutouts in one season.

11
Home runs for Babe Ruth for the world champion Red Sox in 1918, which led the American League. That was the first of 12 home run titles for the Babe.

12
Batting titles for Ty Cobb.

13
Times Lou Gehrig posted 100-plus runs and 100-plus RBIs in the same season, the most all-time.

14
Walk-off losses in the postseason by the New York Yankees.

15
Full seasons in which Joe McCarthy managed the New York Yankees. During his tenure, the Yanks won eight pennants, winning seven World Series, and finished second four times.

16
Retired numbers by the New York Yankees, the most of any franchise. This number includes the No. 42, retired across all of baseball in honor of Jackie Robinson. It counts the No. 8 just once, although it is retired in honor of both Bill Dickey and Yogi Berra.

17
Age of Bob Feller when he made his first major league start in 1936. He tossed a complete game against the St. Louis Browns giving up six hits, four walks, one earned run with 15 strikeouts for the win.

18
World Series home runs for Mickey Mantle, the most all-time.

19
Wins by rookie Mark “The Bird” Fidrych for the Detroit Tigers in 1976, a season in which he captured the hearts of baseball fans everywhere.

20
Consecutive losing seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates, setting the all-time record for any North American major team sport.

21
Consecutive losses by the Baltimore Orioles to begin the season in 1988.

22
Games started in the World Series by Whitey Ford, most all-time.

23
Grand slams hit by Lou Gehrig and Alex Rodriguez, the most all-time.

24
Appearances by Mariano Rivera in the World Series.

25
Hits by Lou Brock in the 1967-68 World Series. The total is the most ever in back-to-back World Series.

26
Consecutive games won by the New York Giants in 1916, the longest winning streak in history. From Sept. 7-Sept. 30, the Giants didn’t lose a game, but gained just 8.5 games in the standings before finishing the season in fourth place. Lefty Tyler of the Boston Braves pitched a complete game to end the streak.

27
Wins for Steve Carlton of the Philadelphia Phillies in 1972. The team won just 59 games that season giving Lefty more than 45 percent of his team’s wins.

28
Times Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera grounded into a double play in 2012, which led the majors.

29
Wins for the Baltimore Orioles in one-run games in 2012. Their 29-9 record (.763) is the best all-time.

30
Home runs hit by Albert Pujols after May 5 last season. The slugger began the season by hitting just .217 with no homers and four RBIs in April. After taking a day of on May 5, he homered the next day and proceeded to put together a Pujols-esque season.

31
Wins for Lefty Grove of the Philadelphia A’s in 1931 and Detroit’s Denny McLain in 1968, the highest win total in the live ball era (since 1920).

32
Postseason doubles for Derek Jeter, most all-time.

33
Miles between the high schools where reigning Cy Young winners R.A. Dickey (Montgomery Bell Academy, Nashville, Tenn.) and David Price (Blackman High School, Murfreesboro, Tenn.) attended. It is the closest of any two Cy Young winners from the same season.

34
Hitting streak by Dom DiMaggio of the Boston Red Sox in 1949.

35
Strikeouts by Bob Gibson (27 IP) in the 1968 World Series.

36
At-bats by Jimmy Collins in the 1903 World Series. It’s the most ever in a Fall Classic and was established in the first World Series ever played.

37
Number retired in honor of Hall of Fame manager Casey Stengel by both the Yankees and the Mets.

38
Saves by John Hiller of the Tigers in 1973, just two years after suffering a career-threatening heart attack at age 28. The total led the majors and was the record for saves in a season until 1983.

39
Number retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers in honor of Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella, whose career was cut short due to an auto accident, which left him paralyzed.

40
Appearances in the World Series by the New York Yankees, by far the most of any franchise.

41
Wins by Jack Chesbro of the Yankees in 1904, the highest total since 1900.

42
Number universally retired by MLB in honor of Jackie Robinson.

43
Age of Nolan Ryan when he won his 11th strikeout title. In 1990, he struck out 232, the most in the American league a year after whiffing 301.

44
Consecutive game hitting streak for Pete Rose in 1978 to tie Wee Willie Keeler for the National League record. Rose hit .385 during the streak and raised his average from .267 to .316.

45
Over the 104 years since the Chicago Cubs last won the World Series, the team has had 45 winning records, finished .500 twice and posted 57 losing seasons.

46
Earned runs allowed by the San Francisco Giants in 16 postseason games in 2012.

47
Hank Aaron’s career-best home run season, which came in 1971. The total has been eclipsed 72 times, 28 of those before Aaron retired in 1976.

48
Road wins for the Washington Nationals in 2012, most in the majors.

49
Home runs hit in the regular season by Babe Ruth in ballparks still in use today. Ruth hit 48 home runs at Fenway Park and one at Wrigley Field.

50
World Series games played by Frankie Frisch, eighth all-time, but the most by anyone who never played with the Yankees.

51
Seldom-used uniform number may possibly be retired by five franchises some day. It is already retired by San Diego in honor of closer Trevor Hoffman. It is highly likely to be retired in Seattle (Ichiro Suzuki) and likely by Arizona (Randy Johnson). The Cardinals (Willie McGee) and Yankees (Bernie Williams) have yet to issue the number since those players retired.

52
Last season, the San Diego Padres, according to Elias, became the only team since at least 1900 to have three catchers start as many as 52 games. Nick Hundley started 56 times, John Baker and Yasmani Grandal 52 each.

53
Hits by Cincinnati pitchers last season, most in the majors.

54
Home runs by Babe Ruth in 1920, smashing the record of 29 that Ruth had set the year before. The total of 54 was eclipsed by just one team in all of baseball that season (other than the Yankees), the Philadelphia Phillies.

55
Wins for the Houston Astros in 2012, a franchise low including the strike-shortened seasons of 1981 and 1994.

56
Consecutive games in which Joe DiMaggio of the Yankees hit safely in 1941. Interestingly, during that same stretch from May 15 to July 16, Ted Williams of the Red Sox outhit Joe D .412 to .408 with a better on-base percentage (.540 to .463) and OPS (1.224 to 1.181).

57
Road home runs hit by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2012, the lowest total in baseball.

58
Home runs needed by Oakland A’s hitters to reach 12,000 in franchise history. Getting their start in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics, the franchise also played in Kansas City from 1955-67 before relocating to Oakland in 1968. Entering this season, only eight other franchises (New York Yankees, San Francisco Giants, Chicago Cubs, Atlanta Braves, Detroit Tigers, Boston Red Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Philadelphia Phillies) have hit 12,000 or more home runs. The Baltimore Orioles will also reach this milestone this season and should do so before the A's, as the O's need just eight round-trippers to reach 12,000.

59
Consecutive scoreless innings pitched by Orel Hershiser to end the 1988 season. The streak including five complete games in September and 10 shutout innings in his last start, which the Dodgers eventually lost 2-1 in 16 innings.

60
Extra innings played by Baltimore last season.

61
Number of games last season that Tampa Bay pitchers struck out 10 or more batters breaking the record of 57 set by the Cubs in 2003.

62
Number of players drafted by the Arizona Diamondbacks in 1996, two years before the club fielded its first major league team.

63
Fewest regular-season wins ever for a World Series winner. The Los Angeles Dodgers won just 63 games in 1981, a season shortened by almost 40 percent to a players strike.

64
Years since the Cleveland Indians last won the World Series. It is the second-longest drought in baseball behind the 104 years that Cubs fans have been waiting.

65
Average number of wins for the Kansas City Athletics during their last seven years in the Midwest before moving to Oakland in 1968.

66
Wins for the Cincinnati Reds in 1981, the most in the National League. However, the Reds were not one of the four teams in the playoffs that season. The St. Louis Cardinals also had the best winning percentage in the National League East, but didn’t qualify for the playoffs that season due to the split-season format forced by the players strike.

67
All-time record number of doubles in a season set by Earl Webb in 1931.

68
Wins needed by Josh Beckett, Carlos Zambrano and Randy Wolf to reach 200 for their careers.

69
Runs scored by the San Francisco Giants in 16 postseason games in 2012.

70
Home runs hit by Mark McGwire in 1998 to break the 37-year-old record of 61 held by Roger Maris.

71
Hits in World Series play by Yogi Berra, most all-time.

72
Highest uniform number retired for a player. The Chicago White Sox retired No. 72 in honor of Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk.

73
Home runs for Barry Bonds in 2001, setting a new record for home runs in a season.

74
Wins for the Orioles last season against no losses when leading after seven innings.

75
World Series games played by Yogi Berra, the most all-time.

76
2013 will be the 76th season since a player in the National League won a triple crown. In 1937, Joe Medwick for St. Louis was the last National Leaguer to accomplish this. Joey Votto, Matt Kemp and Ryan Braun seem to be the likeliest candidates to break the string with Carlos Gonzalez, Giancarlo Stanton, Justin Upton and perhaps Bryce Harper having outside shots.

77
Points Alex Rios’ batting average increased from 2011 to 2012 (.227 to .304)

78
Stolen bases by Jose Reyes in 2007, the most of any player in the 1990s and 2000s.

79
Percent of the seasons that the New York Yankees have finished above .500. In 112 seasons, the Yanks have posted 89 winning seasons and finished at an even .500 once.

80
Hits Colorado first baseman Todd Helton needs to reach the 2,500 mark in his career. That would make Helton just the 7th player in major league history to have 2,500 hits, 1,300 runs, 500 doubles, 350 home runs, 1,300 RBIs, a batting average of .300 or better and more walks than strikeouts in their career. The others are Hank Aaron, Lou Gehrig, Chipper Jones, Stan Musial, Babe Ruth and Ted Williams.

81
Wins by Mike Cuellar, Dave McNally, Pat Dobson and Jim Palmer in 1971 for the Baltimore Orioles. That was the last time a team had four 20-game winners.

82
Players with 250 home runs for one club. There are 10 Yankees who have hit as many as 250 homers in pinstripes. Arizona, Washington, Tampa Bay, San Diego and Miami have none.

83
Fewest regular-season wins ever for a world champion in a season not cut short due to a labor dispute or war. The St. Louis Cardinals squeaked into the playoffs in 2006 with an 83-78 record.

84
Home runs for Curtis Granderson over the past two seasons. No other player has more than 74.

85
Runs scored by Albert Pujols of the Los Angeles Angels last season. It was the first time in his 12-year career than the All-Star first baseman had scored fewer than 99 in a season.

86
Years between World Series wins for the Red Sox. Boston won in 1918 then suffered through 86 years before winning again in 2004.

87
Wins needed by the Los Angeles Angels this season to end the season above .500 for the history of the franchise. The last time the team was above .500 was after their first game in history on April 11, 1961.

88
Years between World Series wins for the White Sox. Chicago won in 1917 then suffered through 88 years before winning again in 2005.

89
Years since Washington, D.C. celebrated a World Series win. The old Washington Senators (now the Minnesota Twins) defeated the New York Giants in seven games in 1924. It was Tom Zachary, not the great Walter Johnson, who won two games. Goose Goslin and Bucky Harris combined to drive in more than half of the Senators’ runs.

90
The number of shutouts that Roy Halladay needs to tie Walter Johnson for the most all-time. Halladay is the active leader with 20.

91
Tim Raines received 91 more votes (297 to 206) than Barry Bonds in the most recent Hall of Fame balloting.

92
Runs Derek Jeter needs this season to pass Babe Ruth as the all-time leader in New York Yankees' franchise history.

93
Plate appearances at the Triple-A level for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout before his call-up last April. He was batting .403 with a .467 OBP and had four doubles, five triples, a homer and scored 21 runs in 20 games with Salt Lake.

94
Wins for Babe Ruth as a pitcher.

95
Average number of wins for the Oakland A’s from 1971-75 during which they won five AL West titles and three straight World Series.

96
Doubles for Alex Gordon of Kansas City over the past two seasons, the most in the majors.

97
Average number of wins for the New York Yankees over the last 17 years. (1996-2012)

98
Wins by the Washington Nationals last season establishing a new high-water mark for the franchise surpassing the 95 wins by the 1979 Expos.

99
Hits needed by Alex Rodriguez to become the 29th member of the 3,000-hit club.

100
Wins for the Amazin’ New York Mets in 1969 after finishing in ninth or 10th place the previous seven years.

Teaser:
<p> 101 statistics, facts and other tidbits to get you ready for the upcoming season</p>
Post date: Friday, March 29, 2013 - 12:10
Path: /mlb/2013-mlb-predictions-american-league
Body:

The 2013 MLB season is almost here. Texas and Houston will get things started on Sunday night as the Astros play their first-ever game as an American League team. That's not the only change baseball fans will have to get used to this season as interleague play will take place year-round, starting with the Los Angeles Angels opening their season in Cincinnati.

In the American League alone, many players, notably Josh Hamilton, Torii Hunter, James Shields and Nick Swisher will be in a different uniform this season, while others like Michael Bourn, Melky Cabrera, R.A. Dickey, Jose Reyes and Shane Victorino are switching leagues entirely. There also is another crop of up-and-coming players that everyone will be watching to see if any of them can have the same type of impact that Mike Trout and Bryce Harper had on their respective teams last season.

Related: 2013 NL Predictions

2013 American League Predictions

AL East
1. New York
2. Tampa Bay (Wild Card)
3. Toronto
4. Baltimore
5. Boston

The Toronto Blue Jays made the biggest splash of the offseason and the AL East with the additions of shortstop Jose Reyes and starting pitchers R.A. Dickey, Josh Johnson and Mark Buehrle. Robinson Cano anchors the injury-riddled Yankees’ lineup. Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez and Mark Teixeira will begin the season on the disabled list. Tampa Bay has, by far, the best pitching, maybe in either league. The rotation, led by Cy Young winner David Price, and the bullpen, led by Fernando Rodney, are deep and talented. While the Blue Jays added some key components, especially in the rotation, the bullpen has questions. The Orioles found magic in extra-innings and close games last season. They probably won’t go 29-9 in one-run games again. Boston is now the team left out of contention.

AL Central
1. Detroit
2. Cleveland
3. Kansas City
4. Chicago
5. Minnesota

Last season there was no debate over the favorite in the AL Central. The Tigers made the experts sweat a little falling behind by six games in June, but managed to eke out a division title, taking over first place for good with eight games to play. Triple crown winner Miguel Cabrera returns as does Prince Fielder, ace Justin Verlander and Victor Martinez, who missed last season with a knee injury. Cleveland with new manager Terry Francona should be better, but still not at Detroit’s level. Kansas City now has a respectable rotation but is still dependent on youngsters developing in the bullpen. The White Sox clearly overachieved last season and were in contention until the final week of the season. The Twins are still attempting to develop young pitchers. Kyle Gibson may be the team’s next ace, but he’ll begin this season in Triple-A.

AL West
1. Los Angeles
2. Texas (Wild Card)
3. Oakland
4. Seattle
5. Houston

The Los Angeles Angels continued to up the ante in the AL West by signing Josh Hamilton a year after inking Albert Pujols. With those two former MVPs and leadoff hitter Mike Trout, the Angels clearly have the best lineup in the division. However, the Angels’ bullpen was among the worst in the majors last season. Texas will miss long-time linchpin Michael Young and Hamilton even though Adrian Beltre is among the best hitters in the league. Lest we forget, it was the Oakland A’s who won the AL West last season. There were some smoke and mirrors along with stingy pitching and the emergence of Yoenis Cespedes. Seattle has made a financial commitment to ace Felix Hernandez, but the M’s are easily a notch below the leaders. The Houston Astros join the AL at the lowest point in franchise history.

ALCS
Detroit over Los Angeles

World Series
Detroit over Washington

AL MVP
1. Robinson Cano, Yankees
2. Miguel Cabrera, Tigers
3. Evan Longoria, Rays
4. Albert Pujols, Angels
5. Adam Jones, Orioles
6. Mike Trout, Angels
7. Prince Fielder, Tigers
8. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays
9. Yoenis Cespedes, A's
10. Adrian Beltre, Rangers

AL Cy Young
1. Justin Verlander, Tigers
2. David Price, Rays
3. Jared Weaver, Angels
4. Felix Hernandez, Mariners
5. Yu Darvish, Rangers

AL Rookie of the Year
1. Wil Myers, Rays
2. Jurickson Profar, Rangers
3. Dylan Bundy, Orioles

Teaser:
<p> Athlon Sports picks this season's American League division and award winners</p>
Post date: Friday, March 29, 2013 - 11:00
Path: /mlb/2013-baseball-preview-san-diego-padres
Body:

Despite new ownership and a new TV deal, it looks like it’s going to be more of the same for the Padres. While the NL West rival San Francisco Giants are coming off a second World Series title in three seasons and the Los Angeles Dodgers continue to spend lavishly, the Padres appear content with the status quo. They hope Chase Headley will replicate his big season, and they will continue to build from within. They don’t seem inclined to go after big-name free agents, even though they are bringing in the fences at Petco Park. The Padres were so bad in April and May that a strong second half couldn’t lift them out of fourth place.

Rotation
The Padres were hit particularly hard by injuries to starters last season, beginning when projected Opening Day starter Tim Stauffer was scratched hours before first pitch due to a sore elbow. Stauffer came back in May and made only one start before the injury flared up again. Then again, it wasn’t a powerhouse rotation to begin with. Edinson Volquez, one of four players obtained from Cincinnati for Mat Latos, bounced back nicely from a disappointing final season with the Reds. Jason Marquis made 15 starts after coming to San Diego from Minnesota, and posted the lowest WHIP (1.302) of his career. Eric Stults seemed to get better as the season progressed. The Padres won eight of his final 10 starts. Tyson Ross, who never found his groove in Oakland last season, has earned the fifth spot with s strong spring.
 
Bullpen
Injuries weren’t limited to the rotation. Huston Street, who replaced Heath Bell as the closer, was on the disabled list twice, with lattisimus dorsi and calf injuries. Nonetheless, he made his first All-Star team and converted 23-of-24 save opportunities. The Padres gave him a $14 million, two-year contract extension. San Diego will look for some stability in the bullpen, where 19 different pitchers made at least one appearance last year. The pen featured seven rookies, including righthanders Brad Boxberger (2.60 ERA in 24 games), Brad Brach (3.78 ERA in 67 games), Dale Thayer (3.43 ERA in 64 games) and Nick Vincent (1.71 ERA in 27 games). Luke Gregerson is the only remaining pitcher from San Diego’s former 1-2-3 punch in the pen, which included Mike Adams and Bell.

Middle Infield
The Padres injected some life into their dismal season when they released second baseman Orlando Hudson and placed shortstop Jason Bartlett on the disabled list with a knee injury on May 17. On the same day, the Padres brought up Everth Cabrera, who has been with the Padres off and on since 2009, and exciting Alexi Amarista, who stands just 5'7" and was obtained from the Angels in the deal for reliever Ernesto Frieri. Cabrera became the first Padres player to lead the National League in stolen bases, swiping 44 bags in 48 attempts. While Cabrera took over at shortstop, Amarista split time with Logan Forsythe at second base. Forsythe is the projected starter at second, but Amarista will definitely be in the mix. Top prospect Jedd Gyorko could force himself into the picture if he continues to hit well.

Corners
After failing to put up the kind of numbers expected of a third baseman in his first four big-league seasons, Headley more than made up for it with a career year in 2012. The Padres, who control Headley’s rights for two more seasons, would like to see him do it again. He’ll get a late start this season due to a fractured thumb that will cost him the first month or so. With a more aggressive approach and adjustments to his swing that helped him cope with spacious Petco Park, he hit .286 with 31 home runs and led the National League with 115 RBIs. Headley was rewarded with his first Gold Glove and Silver Slugger awards, and he finished fifth in NL MVP voting. On the other side of the infield, Yonder Alonso had a solid rookie season. He started 144 games at first base, hit .273 and led all big-league rookies with 39 doubles, which set a Padres rookie record. Alonso is one of four players obtained from the Reds for Latos the previous offseason.

Outfield
Two of the three probable starters, left fielder Carlos Quentin and center fielder Cameron Maybin, have contract security. The Padres haven’t yet bestowed that on right fielder Will Venable. Quentin had a mixed season, showing the power the Padres sought when they obtained him from the White Sox but missing considerable time after having arthroscopic knee surgery during spring training. Quentin played in only 86 games, hitting .261 with 16 homers and 46 RBIs in 284 at-bats. After being reinstated from the 15-day disabled list on May 28, he announced his arrival by hitting five home runs, four doubles and driving in nine runs in his first six games. If he can stay healthy, he can do some damage at Petco Park. The Padres gave Quentin a $27 million, three-year contract that runs through 2015. During spring training, the Padres signed Maybin to a $25 million, five-year contract. He started slowly but set career-highs by playing in 147 games and driving in 45 runs, and tied his career-best with 44 walks. Maybin made several spectacular catches, including robbing Matt Kemp of a go-ahead homer in a Padres win at Dodger Stadium in early September. Venable made a career-high 103 starts, 80 of them in right, while hitting .264 with nine homers. Chris Denorfia started 60 games in right and proved his worth by setting career-highs with a .293 average, 102 hits, 19 doubles, 56 runs scored and 130 games played.

Catching
The Padres were thrilled with Yasmani Grandal after he made his big-league debut on June 20. He hit .297 with 16 extra-base hits and 36 RBIs in 60 games, with 52 starts. Then they were shocked when Grandal was suspended for the first 50 games of 2013 after testing positive for testosterone. Grandal’s suspension gives the job back to Nick Hundley, who seemed expendable after an awful season. Hundley was given a $9 million, three-year contract extension during spring training, then proceeded to hit just .157, was demoted to Triple-A and then, after being recalled, suffered a season-ending knee injury. Backup John Baker also returns.

Bench
Denorfia is practically a starter, platooning with Venable in right field and also making starts in left and center. Amarista excited fans with his speed and hustle as he played second base and a little bit at shortstop. Baker ended up starting 52 games at catcher and will be called on again early this season due to Grandal’s suspension. The Padres like Mark Kotsay’s veteran leadership — in the clubhouse as well as in the dugout — so much that he’ll be back at age 37.

Management
The Padres picked up the options for 2014 and ’15 for manager Bud Black, who is the eternal optimist. On one hand, he’s perfect for this club because of his positive nature. On the other hand, there are some who would like to see Black get on his players more. Like Bruce Bochy before him, Black seems destined to shepherd a team that’s barely given a fighting chance by ownership. General manager Josh Byrnes says the Padres were inspired by seeing another low-budget team, the Oakland A’s, reach the playoffs last season.

Final Analysis
The Padres teased their fans with a strong finish in 2009, followed by a 90-win 2010 season that fell just short of the playoffs. They appear to be following the same script, although losing 10 of their final 15 games of 2012 put a damper on what had been a strong second half. The Padres might inch closer to finishing .500 or slightly above, but that’s probably about all the fans can expect this season. If they’re really going to contend, that probably won’t happen until 2014 or later. Their payroll is expected to increase beyond last year’s $55 million, but much of it will go toward salaries decided in arbitration rather than to free agents. A big clue came when the Padres were extremely quiet during the Winter Meetings.

Lineup
SS Everth Cabrera (S)
Recalled on May 17 and became first Padre to lead NL in stolen bases with 44 in 48 attempts.
2B Logan Forsythe (R)
Played in 91 games, including 73 starts at second, and hit .273 in first full big-league season. Could lose playing time to top prospect Jedd Gyorko, who will fill in at third during Headley's absence.
3B Chase Headley (S)
Former second-round pick became the first player in Padres history to have two months with 30-plus RBIs. Will miss the start of the season with a fractured thumb, but hopes to return in April.
LF Carlos Quentin (R)
Limited to 86 games after knee surgery; five of his 16 homers came in his first six games.
1B Yonder Alonso (L)
Made 144 starts, had .348 on-base percentage and hit .273 with Padres rookie-record 39 doubles.
RF Will Venable (L)
Played in career-high 148 games, including 103 starts; tied career-best with .264 average.
CF Cameron Maybin (R)
Set career highs with 147 games played and 45 RBIs and tied career-high with 44 walks.
C Nick Hundley (R)
Rough year included demotion to minors, .157 average and season-ending knee injury.

Bench
C John Baker (L)
Played in 63 games and started 52; threw out only 9-of-58 basestealers.
UT Jesus Guzman (R)
Utilityman made first Opening Day roster and started 65 games at three different positions (plus DH).
OF Mark Kotsay (L)
Hit .271 with two homers and nine RBIs as pinch-hitter; started 29 games. Should make a terrific manager some day.
OF Chris Denorfia (R)
Made career-high 77 starts in outfield; batted leadoff in 45 games, hitting .303.
IF Alexi Amarista (L)
Injected life into middle infield after trade from Angels; first career home run was game-winning grand slam.

Rotation
RH  Edinson Volquez
Was 11–11 with 4.14 ERA in first Padres season; threw first complete game, a one-hitter vs. Houston at Petco.
LH  Clayton Richard
Workhorse set career-highs with 218.2 innings, 14
victories and 31 homers allowed.
RH  Jason Marquis
After release by Twins was 6–7 with 4.04 ERA in 15 starts for Padres before breaking left wrist.
LH  Eric Stults
Waived by White Sox; went 8–3 with 2.92 ERA in 18 games with Padres, including 14 starts.
RH  Tyson Ross
Struggled mightily with Oakland last season, but has rebounded with a strong spring.

Bullpen
RH  Huston Street (Closer)
First-time All-Star converted 23-of-24 save opportunities; earned two-year extension.
RH  Luke Gregerson
Had career-bests with 2.39 ERA and nine saves in team-high 77 appearances.
RH  Dale Thayer
Was 2–2 with 3.43 ERA and seven saves in 64 games in his longest big-league stint.
RH  Brad Brach
Was 2–4 with 3.78 ERA and led all NL rookies with 67 appearances, second-most on team.
LH  Joe Thatcher
Bounced back from 2011 shoulder surgery to pitch in 55 games, going 1–4 with 3.41 ERA.
LH  Tommy Layne
Made jump from Double-A to majors, going 2–0 with a 3.24 ERA in 26 appearances.
RH  Anthony Bass
Split between rotation and pen; went 2–8 with 4.73 ERA and had first career complete game and save.

Teaser:
<p> Despite new ownership and a new TV deal, it looks like it’s going to be more of the same for the Padres</p>
Post date: Friday, March 29, 2013 - 10:30
Path: /mlb/2013-baseball-preview-san-francisco-giants
Body:

A band of misfits won the World Series in 2010. Two years later, the Giants simply banded together. Their second title in three seasons felt more scripted than ad-libbed, as a fantastic defense made plays behind a talented pitching staff, and NL MVP Buster Posey steadied the entire operation from behind the plate. The Giants survived six playoff elimination games and became the first NL team since the Big Red Machine in the 1970s to win two World Series in a three-year span. But these Giants aren’t seen as a dynasty yet, mostly because they’ve had so much turnover in their everyday lineup. There will be new challenges as the Giants seek to wear the crown a bit better this time around, especially since the archrival Dodgers all but broke into Fort Knox while loading up their roster with former All-Stars since the middle of last season. Even though the Giants brought back all their impact players from a year ago, they might be considered, by some, underdogs to win the West. It’s a role that has suited them just fine.

Rotation
The Giants received at least 30 starts from five different pitchers — and all five return this season. Stalwart ace Matt Cain had no complaints after signing a $112 million extension, throwing the first perfect game in the Giants’ 129-year existence, starting for the NL All-Star squad and capping it off with another World Series ring. Madison Bumgarner, who turned 23 in August, topped 200 innings for the second consecutive year. Well-traveled Ryan Vogelsong proved his breakout 2011 campaign was no fluke; he led the NL in ERA as late as Aug. 12 and completed at least six innings in each of his first 21 starts — the longest streak by a Giant since Atlee Hammaker in 1983. As for Barry Zito, long the butt of jokes for his $126 million contract? He paid dividends as the Giants went 21–11 in his starts — including 14 consecutive wins to end the season, if you include his three playoff starts. Those fantastic four made it easier for the Giants to absorb a wildly erratic year from two-time Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum, whose 5.18 ERA was the highest among all NL pitchers to qualify for the ERA title. But this lines up to be the NL’s best rotation in 2013.
 
Bullpen
It’s hard to replace a ninth-inning presence like Brian Wilson, but the Giants made a successful adjustment after the black-bearded Taco Bell pitchman was lost to elbow surgery on the season-opening road trip. After non-tendering Wilson and letting him become a free agent, the Giants will be in committee mode again to open the season. Sergio Romo is expected to get first crack at the ninth inning after he fearlessly threw his sweeping slider and 88 mph two-seamer to escape every big spot in the playoffs. The Giants re-signed valuable lefthander Jeremy Affeldt to a three-year contract and wrapped up righthander Santiago Casilla for three more years, too. Casilla saved 19 of his first 20 chances last season before yielding the closer job in July. Sidewinding lefty Javier Lopez also returns; he’s allowed one home run in two-plus seasons as a Giant.

Middle Infield
Brandon Crawford is a Bay Area native who grew up idolizing Royce Clayton. When Crawford took over the everyday shortstop position, his idol gave him one piece of advice: Stabilize the infield. Crawford struggled to do that in the first two months of last season while committing 12 errors in his first 59 games. But he committed just six miscues after that, and he was a playmaking force in the postseason while mixing in a few clutch hits. The Giants paired Crawford’s youth with second baseman Marco Scutaro’s professionalism after they acquired the league’s best contact man (he misses on just 5.3 percent of swings he takes) from Colorado at the trade deadline. Scutaro, the NLCS MVP, hit .362 for the Giants during the regular season, and he carries a 20-game hitting streak into 2013. The 37-year-old probably won’t approach those numbers, but he’s a reliable hit-and-run presence for a team that thrives on crossing the plate without home runs.

Corners
The bad news: Pablo Sandoval spent a lot of time on the disabled list for the second straight year. The good news: The switch-hitter has no more hamate bones to break, after dealing with surgeries to repair fractures in both hands. Sandoval, the World Series MVP by virtue of his three-homer game off of Justin Verlander, is forever on the verge of an MVP-caliber season. Although his weight is scrutinized, he’s a gifted athlete who moves well enough to be a solid defender at third base. Brandon Belt endured an up-and-down first season but showed flashes of the pure-hitting talent that allowed him to rocket through the minor leagues. The former pitching prospect is a Gold Glove-caliber presence at first base, even if he hasn’t put up the kind of power production associated with the position. Expect Posey to log 30 or so starts at first base as the Giants seek to save the legs of their most gifted hitter.

Outfield
Angel Pagan’s career year included a MLB-leading 15 triples, which broke the Giants’ San Francisco-era franchise record previously held by Willie Mays. The club responded by signing him to a four-year, $40 million contract — a bit of a reach for a 31-year-old who’d only played in 125 games twice in his career. But the Giants didn’t have another in-house candidate to replace Pagan’s leadoff presence, since top prospect Gary Brown isn’t ready yet. Right fielder Hunter Pence reached 100 RBIs for the first time in his career, and even managed to knock in 45 runs in 59 games as a Giant despite hitting .219. The Giants’ toughest task in the outfield will be replacing the production of Melky Cabrera, who was leading the majors in hits and runs on Aug. 15 when he was suspended 50 games for a positive testosterone test. Gregor Blanco, a non-roster invitee last spring, will get the bulk of time in left field. But a former 2010 World Series hero, Andres Torres, was re-signed to a one-year contract and will compete for at-bats. The switch-hitting Torres is likely to start against lefthanders.

Catching
What a difference Posey makes. In 2011, when a vicious home plate collision destroyed his ankle and ended his season in May, the Giants coughed away the division in the final eight weeks. Posey didn’t take long to reestablish his offensive presence and poise behind the plate. He’s the cleanup centerpiece the Giants had lacked ever since Barry Bonds retired. Posey became the first Giant since Bonds in 2004 to drive in 100 runs; more notably, he became the first NL catcher to win a batting title since Ernie Lombardi in 1942. Not bad, considering it was his first full season in the bigs.

Bench
Joaquin Arias is a better right-handed hitter than the numbers indicate, and he can fill in at three infield positions. Backup catcher Hector Sanchez developed a good rapport with Lincecum and Zito, and the switch-hitter is far from an easy out. Aubrey Huff and Xavier Nady are gone, so the Giants could look within the system for depth, with outfielders Roger Kieschnick and Francisco Peguero knocking on the door.

Management
In three seasons, Bruce Bochy went from being viewed as a slow-talking retread to a certifiable genius with a Hall of Fame résumé. He brilliantly shuffled a tired rotation in the postseason and turned Lincecum from an inconsistent starter into a radioactive weapon in long relief. Brian Sabean returns for his 17th season — the longest consecutive tenure of any current GM in the game. It’s hard to find a manager and GM who are more on the same page than Bochy and Sabean.

Final Analysis
Not only did the Giants get the band back together by re-signing Pagan, Scutaro and Affeldt, but they also brought back a 2010 World Series hero in Torres. They can’t count on smooth sailing to another division title, though, given their rivals’ free spending.

Lineup
CF Angel Pagan (S)
Rare hitter whose game thrives at AT&T Park, which is made for triples.
2B Marco Scutaro (R)
Veteran knocked in 44 runs in 243 at-bats after joining the Giants last summer.
3B Pablo Sandoval (S)
Judged Miss Universe pageant over the winter, now hoping for an all-world season.
C Buster Posey (R)
Patient, disciplined, confident and calculating; Posey is a pure hitter.
RF Hunter Pence (R)
Plate discipline is lacking, and he doesn’t look pretty, but he still finds a way to drive in runs.
1B Brandon Belt (L)
The “Baby Giraffe” hit .254 before the break, .293 after it; only hit seven home runs in 411 at-bats.
LF Gregor Blanco (L)
Superb defender is a solid OBP guy but wears down when he plays every day.
SS Brandon Crawford (L)
Wasn’t even a finalist for the Gold Glove last season, which was a crock.

Bench
OF Andres Torres (S)
A year after trading him to Mets for Angel Pagan, Giants scooped him up again as a free agent.
INF Joaquin Arias (R)
Former top prospect hit .303 vs. left-handed pitching in his first season with the Giants.
C Hector Sanchez (S)
Caught 25 of Barry Zito’s 32 starts and 16 of Tim Lincecum’s 33, allowing Buster Posey’s legs to stay fresh.
1B Brett Pill (R)
Beat Clayton Kershaw with a two-run homer, but had arthroscopic knee surgery in March and will miss the start of the season.
OF Francisco Peguero (S)
Tooled-up and with a cannon arm, Peguero needs to get on base more to become an everyday player.

Rotation
RH  Matt Cain
His 14 strikeouts in a perfect game matched Sandy Koufax for the most all-time.
LH  Madison Bumgarner
His 16 wins were most by a Giants lefty since Kirk Rueter in 1998.
RH  Tim Lincecum
Delivery was a mess as he led NL in losses, runs allowed, earned runs, wild pitches; second in walks.
LH  Barry Zito
Pivotal win in Game 5 of NLCS at St. Louis was his first in postseason since 2003 with A’s.
RH  Ryan Vogelsong
Postseason ace (3–0, 1.09 ERA in ’12) has thrown 41 quality starts over last two regular seasons.

Bullpen
RH  Sergio Romo (Closer)
Only Craig Kimbrel, Aroldis Chapman and Eric O’Flaherty posted a lower ERA among NL relievers.
LH  Javier Lopez
Sidearm specialist held lefties to a .191 average and did not allow a hit in 3.0 postseason innings.
RH  Santiago Casilla
Had a 1.82 ERA after Aug. 1 but didn’t regain closer role; saved 25 games total.
LH  Jeremy Affeldt
Filthy curveball artist has thrown 42.2 consecutive innings without allowing a home run.
RH   George Kontos
Made huge improvement stranding inherited runners, especially in playoffs.
RH  Chad Gaudin
Is now pitching for his eighth franchise in last six seasons.
LH  Jose Mijares
He had seven holds and a win after joining the Giants in early August.

Teaser:
<p> With the band virtually intact, the Giants are poised for another title run.</p>
Post date: Friday, March 29, 2013 - 10:30

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