Articles By Nathan Rush

Path: /college-football/senior-bowl-winners-and-losers
Body:

As always, there was money to be made at the Senior Bowl, where high-profile prospects and small school gems alike look to prove their worth to NFL executives, coaches and scouts. The South defeated the North, 21–16, with Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel earning MVP honors.

But the games within the game — along with the previous week’s practice — were more important than the scoreboard. Here are the Mobile money makers as well as the players who have ground to make up heading into the Scouting Combine (Feb. 20-26) and leading up to the 2013 NFL Draft (April 25-27).

Winners
 
Eric Fisher, LT, Central Michigan
Already a late first-round prospect, the 6-7, 305-pound Fisher vaulted himself into the top-10 pick conversation and “by simple math, made $4 million bucks,” according to NFL Network scouting guru Mike Mayock, who said Fisher was “(49ers Pro Bowl left tackle) Joe Staley with better feet.”

Ezekial Ansah, DE, BYU
“Ziggy” is hoping to ride the “next Jason Pierre-Paul” hype as far as he can up draft boards. Ansah’s Senior Bowl game was certainly JPP-like, with a sack, forced fumble, batted ball at the line on a screen pass and open field tackle for a loss against Michigan’s Denard Robinson. No one was more impressive on game day than Ansah.
 
EJ Manuel, QB, Florida State
The MVP completed 7-of-10 passes for 76 yards, one TD and one INT on a tipped pass, while showing off his mobility with another TD on the ground. Manuel’s scoring strike was a perfectly thrown 20-yard touch pass over the top to Alabama tight end Michael Williams in the back of the end zone.
 
Robert Alford, CB, Southeastern Louisiana
It was a good day for small school corners, as Alford and William & Mary’s B.W. Webb both shined in coverage and as return men. Alford opened the game with an 88-yard kickoff return and finished strong with an INT in the end zone on a 2-point conversion attempt.
 
Desmond Trufant, CB, Washington
The best cornerback in practices showed off his straight line speed by hawking Alford from behind to make a TD-saving tackle (albeit with a facemask penalty tacked on to the end of the run) on the opening kickoff. Desmond is quickly following in the NFL footsteps of his brothers Marcus and Isaiah.
 
Lane Johnson, LT, Oklahoma
The 6’6”, 300-pound former quarterback solidified his status as a first-round talent with the feet and frame to play left tackle at the next level.

Kawann Short, DT, Purdue
The top D-tackle in Mobile, Short was disruptive all afternoon, teaming with UCLA’s Datone Jones to form a nearly unblockable tackle tag-team.

D.J. Fluker, OT, Alabama
Danny Lee Jesus didn’t play in the game itself, but the massive 6’5”, 355-pounder stole the show at the weigh-in and could be one of the fastest risers in this year’s class by the time the Commissioner is giving bear hugs.

Mike Mayock, NFL Network
One of the best in the business, Mayock was on his game yet again — calling name-dropping colleague Charles Davis “first-team All-Elevator” while providing brutally honest assessments of everyone other than Oregon O-lineman Kyle Long, the son of Mayock’s 1980 Blue-Gray Game roommate Howie Long.
 
Losers
 
Mike Glennon, QB, NC State
Showed flashes of a big league arm, but threw too many ground balls in the dirt and showed little pocket presence. The 6’7” Glennon completed 8-of-16 passes for 82 yards. Still, in a league desperate for quarterbacks, there’s probably a team already trying to convince itself that Glennon is the next Joe Flacco.
 
Landry Jones, QB, Oklahoma
Showed no awareness, holding the ball too long, allowing the pocket to collapse around him and throwing an ill-conceived dump-off pass on 4th-and-8. Jones completed 3-of-9 passes for 16 yards, took two sacks and looked lost for much of the game.

Denard Robinson, WR, Michigan
“Shoelace” fought through an arm injury to participate in the Senior Bowl. So, in that regard, he is a winner. Unfortunately, his only real highlight was the lowlight of being caught by Ziggy Ansah for a 3-yard loss on an end-around. Denard X will need to run like lightning at the Combine to save his struggling draft stock.

John Jenkins, NT, Georgia
Never was it harder to find a man who stands 6’3” and 350-plus pounds than it was with Jenkins during the game in the Senior Bowl. But legit nose tackles are hard to find, so this boom-or-bust Dawg will hear his name called earlier than most on draft day.
 
T.J. McDonald, S, USC
Tim’s son was beaten badly by 270-pound Alabama tight end Michael Williams for a TD, failing to find the football in the air or make a play with his athleticism. McDonald reaffirmed the scouting report that he is an in-the-box safety with no ball skills whose last name is his best tool.
 
Marquise Goodwin, WR, Texas
Made the brilliant move of attempting to field a punt at the one-yard-line, then nearly getting tackled in the end zone for a safety before showing off his track star speed.
 
Margus Hunt, DE, SMU
The Estonian “Eastern Block” has an NCAA record 10 blocked field goals, but was confused multiple times by the same misdirection toss and otherwise overmatched against the high-end O-tackles.

Manti Te’o, LB, Notre Dame
Lennay is going to be pissed. Te’o skipped the Senior Bowl altogether, despite on-field concerns following his BCS national title disappearing act and off-field issues in the wake of his catfish story too big for Twitter.
 

Teaser:
<p> Senior Bowl Winners and Losers, including Central Michigan tackle Eric Fisher, BYU defensive end Ezekial "Ziggy" Ansah, Southeastern Louisiana cornerback Robert Alford, Washington cornerback Desmond Trufant, Oklahoma tackle Lane Johnson, NC State quarterback Mike Glennon, Oklahoma quarterback Landry Jones, Michigan receiver Denard Robinson, Georgia nose tackle John Jenkins and USC safety T.J. McDonald.</p>
Post date: Monday, January 28, 2013 - 11:27
Path: /college-football/senior-bowl-preview-5-things-watch
Body:

The 63rd Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala., kicks off Saturday (Jan. 26, 2013) at 4 p.m. EST on NFL Network — or Ladd-Peebles Stadium, if you want to scout from a front row seat. Jim Schwartz and the Detroit Lions are coaching the South squad, with Dennis Allen and the Oakland Raiders leading the North team.

But here’s what to really watch for between the lines once the game gets going:


1. Elite Left Tackles
Texas A&M true junior Luke Joekel isn’t eligible to compete at the Senior Bowl; he’ll probably be kicking it with Johnny Football attempting ridiculous trick shots or gambling or something else crazy. Joekel is considered this year’s top left tackle prospect — and a legit candidate to go No. 1 overall in the draft to the Kansas City Chiefs.

But a pair of first-round candidates will be in Mobile. Central Michigan’s Eric Fisher (6’7”, 305) will man the blindside up North and Oklahoma’s Lane Johnson (6’6”, 303) handles the big money spot down South. Both dancing bears have been cashing in during practice all week, with Fisher working his way into fringe-top-10-pick range.


2. QB Shuffle
Before arriving on the scene at Super Bowl XLVII, Joe Flacco and Colin Kaepernick were low profile Senior Bowl quarterbacks from Delaware and Nevada, respectively. But they aren’t the only recent success stories, four Senior Bowl quarterbacks have been taken in the first-round over the past three drafts.

This year crop of QBs includes NC State’s Mike Glennon, Arkansas’ Tyler Wilson, Oklahoma’s Landry Jones, Syracuse’s Ryan Nassib, Florida State’s EJ Manuel and Miami (Ohio)’s Zac Dysert. With so many teams still unsettled at quarterback, one of these signal-callers could make a late charge up draft boards like Vanderbilt’s Jay Cutler (No. 11 in 2006) or TCU’s Andy Dalton (No. 35 in 2011).


3. Family Traditions
Several familiar surnames will be doing pops and/or big bro proud in Mobile.

Washington cornerback Desmond Trufant studded out during practice this week and might have earned a first-round grade — although he won’t go as high as Marcus Trufant (No. 11) did out of Washington State back in 2003.

USC safety T.J. McDonald weighed in at 6’2” and 205 pounds, with a similar frame to his old man Tim (6’2”, 215) — who went on to a six-time All-Pro and Super Bowl XXIX championship career after being the No. 34 pick in 1987.

Oregon O-lineman Kyle Long is the son of Hall of Famer Howie Long and brother of former No. 2 pick Rams defensive end Chris Long. After measuring in at 6’7”, 312 with shorter than expected arms, Kyle may have to kick in from tackle to guard — but he’s still likely to carry on the Long tradition of his NFL family.



4. Denard X-Factor
The Senior Bowl has proven to be fertile proving ground for quarterbacks-turned-receivers/runners/return-specialists like Indiana’s Antwaan Randle El (MVP in 2002) and West Virginia’s Pat White (MVP in 2009) — both of whom went on to be second-round picks after MVP efforts in the Senior Bowl.

This year, Michigan’s Denard Robinson has had a choppy week of practice while trying to prove he can successfully transition from quarterback to triple-threat playmaker. “Shoelace” will have one last shot to perform in pads — after a career that saw Denard X. pass for 6,250 yards, rush for 4,459 yards and account for 91 total TDs.


5. Raw, Unreal Athletes
Although Alabama right tackle D.J. Fluker won’t play in Saturday afternoon’s game, Danny Lee Jesus stole the show during weigh-ins earlier in the week — checking in at 6’5”, 355 pounds and carrying his weight with impressive ease. Fluker's fellow Crimson Tide national champion, linebacker Nico Johnson, will give local Bama fans a reason to yell "Roll Tide," however, so Nick Saban's club will be well represented.

On game day, all eyes will be on potential 3-4 elephant man Ezekiel “Ziggy” Ansah, BYU’s 6’5”, 270-pound pass rushing specimen who has only been playing football for three years but has been called the “next Jason Pierre-Paul” by some. A few splash plays in the Senior Bowl would go a long way to securing Ziggy’s status as a first-rounder.

Arguably the biggest boom-or-bust prospect in the Senior Bowl — and maybe the entire 2013 draft pool — is 359-pound Georgia nose tackle John Jenkins. To no one’s surprise, Jenkins was the heaviest man on the scales in Mobile and will be one of the players with the most ground to gain or lose on Saturday.

Teaser:
<p> Senior Bowl Preview: 5 Things to Watch, including Central Michigan left tackle Eric Fisher, Oklahoma left tackle Lane Johnson, Michigan's Denard Robinson, Washington cornerback Desmond Trufant, NC State quarterback Mike Glennon, Arkansas quarterback Tyler Wilson, Oklahoma quarterback Landry Jones, USC safety T.J. McDonald, BYU's Ezekiel "Ziggy" Ansah and Georgia nose tackle John Jenkins.</p>
Post date: Friday, January 25, 2013 - 18:57
Path: /nfl/10-greatest-players-never-play-super-bowl
Body:

Being a future Hall of Famer does not guarantee a trip to the Super Bowl. In fact, many of the game’s greatest players never took the field with the Vince Lombardi Trophy on the line. This year, Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed will finally end his Super Sunday drought against the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII. But these all-time greats were not so lucky.


1. Barry Sanders, RB, Lions (1989-98)
Playoff record: 1–5
Playoff stats: 386 rush yards (4.2 ypc), TD; 111 receiving yards (5.3 ypc), TD
Best team: 1991 Lions (12–4 record, lost in NFC Championship Game)
Closest call: 1991 (NFC Championship Game, 41–10 loss at Redskins)


After winning his playoff debut 38–6 against the Cowboys, Sanders lost his next five postseason games. Shockingly, one of the most exciting players of all-time was limited to 13 or fewer carries in four of his six playoff contests. The only time No. 20 was given more than 20 carries, he ripped off 169 yards in a 28–24 loss to the Packers. Although Sanders ran wild every year on Thanksgiving Day, he never showed up to the party on Super Bowl Sunday.


2. Deacon Jones, DE, Rams (1961-71), Chargers (’72-73), Redskins (’74)
Playoff record: 0–2
Playoff stats: N/A
Best team: 1967 Rams (11–1–2 record, lost in Divisional Round)
Closest call: 1969 (Divisional Round, 23–20 loss at Vikings)


The “Secretary of Defense” was known for head-slapping opposing offensive linemen, but the two-time Defensive Player of the Year must have been doing some head-scratching after retiring with zero playoff wins — and zero Super Bowl appearances — despite an unofficial total of 173.5 sacks during his Hall of Fame career.


3. Dick Butkus, LB, Bears (1965-73)
Playoff record: 0–0
Playoff stats: N/A
Best team: 1965 Bears (9–5 record, missed postseason)


Arguably the greatest middle linebacker in history, Butkus played for George Halas — the legendary coach whose name graces the trophy awarded to the winner of the NFC Championship Game — and on the same team as Hall of Fame triple-threat playmaker Gale Sayers. Despite looking great on paper at the time and even better in historical hindsight, Butkus’ Bears were unable to make the playoffs, which is the first step toward advancing to the Super Bowl.


4. Gale Sayers, RB, Bears (1965-71)
Playoff record: 0–0
Playoff stats: N/A
Best team: 1965 Bears (9–5 record, missed postseason)


Butkus and Sayers were drafted Nos. 3 and 4 overall, respectively, by the Bears in 1965. But the Hall of Fame duo were unable to translate their individual achievements into team success. Sayers notched a record six TDs in a single game — with nine carries for 113 yards and four TDs, two catches for 89 yards and one TD, and five punt returns for 134 yards and one TD as a rookie — but failed to score even a single Super Bowl trip.


5. Earl Campbell, RB, Oilers (1978-84), Saints (’84-85)
Playoff record: 3–3
Playoff stats: 420 rush yards (3.1 ypc), 4 TDs; 45 receiving yards (9.0 ypc)
Best team: 1979 Oilers (11–5 record, lost in AFC Championship Game), 1980 Oilers (11–5 record, lost in Wild Card Round)
Closest call: 1979 (AFC Championship Game, 27–13 loss at Steelers), 1978 (AFC Championship Game, 34–5 loss at Steelers)


The “Luv Ya Blue” bulldozer was unable to take down the powerful “Steel Curtain” during back-to-back AFC Championship Game losses. In two painful defeats at Pittsburgh, Campbell had a combined 39 carries for 77 yards (1.97 ypc), two catches for 15 yards, and zero TDs. Campbell’s two scoreless games against the Steelers were the only two playoff games in which he failed to find the end zone.


6. O.J. Simpson, RB, Bills (1969-77), 49ers (’78-79)
Playoff record: 0–1
Playoff stats: 49 rush yards (3.3 ypc); 37 receiving yards (12.3 ypc), TD
Best team: 1974 Bills (9–5 record, lost in Divisional Round)
Closest call: 1974 (Divisional Round, 32–14 loss at Steelers)


Another victim of the mighty Steelers, the Juice had better luck than Campbell — with 18 touches for 86 total yards and one TD — but was unable to lead the Bills to victory in what would be his only postseason appearance. The actor and defendant never basked in the spotlight of the Super Bowl but he was seen by millions during his days as Lt. Nordberg in the "Naked Gun" franchise and his starring role in the Trial of the Century.


7. Eric Dickerson, RB, Rams (1983-87), Colts (’87-91), Raiders (’92), Falcons (’93)
Playoff record: 2–5
Playoff stats: 724 rush yards (4.9 ypc), 3 TDs; 91 receiving yards (4.8 ypc), TD
Best team: 1985 Rams (11–5 record, lost in NFC Championship Game)
Closest call: 1985 (NFC Championship Game, 24–0 loss at Bears)


Upon first glance, the single-season rushing yards record holder posted solid playoff numbers. But take off the goggles and you’ll see that Dickerson’s 248-yard, two-TD outburst during a 20–0 win over the Cowboys in 1985 accounted for one-third of his career postseason rushing yards and half of his total TDs.


8. LaDainian Tomlinson, RB, Chargers (2001-09), Jets (’10-11)
Playoff record: 4–5
Playoff stats: 468 rush yards (3.6 ypc), 6 TDs; 176 receiving yards (7.0 ypc), TD
Best team: 2006 Chargers (14–2 record, lost in Divisional Round)
Closest call: 2010 (AFC Championship Game, 24–19 loss at Steelers), 2007 (AFC Championship Game, 21–12 loss at Patriots)


Infamously sulking on the sideline, injured and wearing in a Darth Vader facemask and trench coat at New England — after just two carries for five yards — was clearly the low point of L.T.’s playoff career. Staying on the dark side, three of his five playoff losses were by margins of three points, one defeat came by four points and the most lopsided was a nine-pointer.


9. Tony Gonzalez, TE, Chiefs (1997-2008), Falcons (2009-12)
Playoff record: 1–6
Playoff stats: 30 catches for 286 yards (9.5 ypc) and 4 TDs
Best team: 2012 Falcons (13–3 record, lost in NFC Championship Game), 2010 Falcons (13–3 record, lost in Divisional Round), 2003 Chiefs (13–3 record, lost in Divisional Round), 1997 Chiefs (13–3 record, lost in Divisional Round)
Closest call: 2012 (NFC Championship Game, 28–24 loss vs. 49ers)


It took Gonzo 16 seasons to finally earn a playoff win. Then, with the Falcons holding a 17–0 lead over the 49ers in the NFC title game, it looked like the future Hall of Fame tight end would be punching his ticket to the Super Bowl and possibly riding off into the sunset as a champion. Nope. Not this year. Gonzalez will have to come back for a 17th season if he hopes to break his Super Bowl-less slide.


10. Warren Moon, QB, Oilers (1984-93), Vikings (’94-96), Seahawks (’97-98), Chiefs (’99-00)
Playoff record: 3–7
Playoff stats: 2,870 yards, 17 TDs, 14 INTs, 84.9 passer rating
Best team: 1993 Oilers (12–4 record, lost in Divisional Round)
Closest call: 1993 (Divisional Round, 28–20 loss vs. Chiefs), 1991 (Divisional Round, 26–24 loss at Broncos), 1988 (Divisional Round, 17–10 loss at Bills)


Moon won five consecutive Grey Cups and was twice named Grey Cup MVP in the Canadian Football League. But in these United States south of the border, the former CFL champion was unable to translate his prior success to the NFL Playoffs. Moon’s waning moment came in the worst collapse in postseason history, as his Oilers watched a 35–3 lead evaporate into a 41–38 overtime loss against the Frank Reich-led Bills.
 

Check out Athlon Sports' special Super Bowl section for more coverage on the Ravens vs. 49ers and the history of the big game.

Teaser:
<p> Sanders, Jones, Butkus and LT never played in the Super Bowl.</p>
Post date: Friday, January 25, 2013 - 07:15
Path: /nfl/25-greatest-tight-ends-nfl-history
Body:

Few positions in football have evolved as much as the tight end — which has morphed from that of old school glorified sixth offensive lineman to modern giant slot receiver. Keeping that role reversal in mind, we rank the 25 greatest tight ends in NFL history.


1. Tony Gonzalez, Chiefs (1997-2008), Falcons (’09-12)
6-time first-team All-Pro
13-time Pro Bowler
1,242 catches for 14,268 yards (11.5 ypc) and 103 TDs

The No. 13 overall pick out of Cal played basketball for the Golden Bears and then used his 6’5”, 250-pound frame to ball about as hard as any pass-catcher this side of Jerry Rice during a sure-fire Hall of Fame career. Gonzalez currently ranks second in all-time receptions, sixth in all-time receiving TDs and seventh in all-time receiving yards — all of which rank first among tight ends.

Regardless of whether the soon-to-be 37-year-old retires following a painful loss in the NFC Championship Game, Gonzalez has already established himself as the greatest to ever play the tight end position.


2. Kellen Winslow, Chargers (1979-87)
Hall of Fame, Class of 1995
3-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
541 catches for 6,741 yards (12.5 ypc) and 45 TDs

Winslow teamed with fellow Hall of Famers Dan Fouts and Charlie Joiner to form the nucleus of the dynamic “Air Coryell” passing attack. One of the original downfield threats from the tight end spot, the 6’5”, 250-pounder led the entire NFL in receptions in 1980 and ’81.

The No. 13 pick out of Missouri posted three of the more impressive seasons ever — with 89 catches for 1,290 yards (14.5 ypc) and nine TDs in 1980, 88 catches for 1,075 yards and 10 TDs in 1981, and 88 catches for 1,172 yards and eight TDs in 1983. Plus, Winslow sired Kellen Winslow II, a full-time “soldier” and part-time tight end who was drafted No. 6 overall in 2004.


3. Mike Ditka, Bears (1961-66), Eagles (’67-68), Cowboys (’69-72)
Hall of Fame, Class of 1988
2-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl VI champion (Cowboys)
427 catches for 5,812 yards (13.6 ypc) and 43 TDs

The No. 5 overall pick out of Pitt exploded onto the scene like only Hurricane Ditka can, posting 56 catches for 1,076 yards (19.2 ypc) and 12 TDs as a rookie. The first tight end inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame also caught a TD from Roger Staubach in Super Bowl VI.


4. John Mackey, Colts (1963-71), Chargers (’72)
Hall of Fame, Class of 1992
3-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
331 catches for 5,236 yards (15.8 ypc) and 38 TDs
19 rushes for 127 yards (6.7 ypc)

Many on this list were winners of the John Mackey Award, which is given annually to the nation’s top collegiate tight end. A big-play threat who revolutionized the position, Mackey supporters can make a strong case that he is the best ever.


5. Shannon Sharpe, Broncos (1990-99, 2002-03), Ravens (’00-01)
Hall of Fame, Class of 2011
4-time first-team All-Pro
8-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XXXII champion (Broncos)
Super Bowl XXXIII champion (Broncos)
Super Bowl XXXV champion (Ravens)
815 catches for 10,060 yards (12.3 ypc) and 62 TDs

Sterling Sharpe’s lesser-known little brother was a seventh-round pick (No. 192 overall) out of Savannah State who worked his way to the top of the tight end mountain — and now he won’t stop talking about it.

But there’s plenty for Shannon to brag about after a career that included back-to-back Super Bowl wins playing with the Broncos’ John Elway and a third Super Bowl ring in four seasons as the Ravens’ go-to guy — a role that led to the longest TD reception in playoff history, a 96-yard score in the 2000 AFC title game.


6. Antonio Gates, Chargers (2003-12)
3-time first-team All-Pro
8-time Pro Bowler
642 catches for 8,321 yards (13.0 ypc) and 83 TDs

Another former basketball player, Gates went undrafted out of Kent State before posting up overmatched defenders with a rare blend of size (6’4”, 255), power and agility. A series of foot injuries have stunted Gates’ career, but not before he was to redefine the parameters within which the position is played.


7. Ozzie Newsome, Browns (1978-90)
Hall of Fame, Class of 1999
1-time first-team All-Pro
3-time Pro Bowler
662 catches for 7,980 yards (12.1 ypc) and 47 TDs

Before becoming the front office architect of the Baltimore Ravens, Newsome was one of the greatest Cleveland Browns and most impressive tight ends in history.


8. Dave Casper, Raiders (1974-80, ’84), Oilers (’81-83), Vikings (’83)
Hall of Fame, Class of 2002
4-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XI champion (Raiders)
Super Bowl XV champion (Raiders)
378 catches for 5,216 yards (13.8 ypc) and 52 TDs

After recording just nine combined catches in his first two seasons, Casper became one of Kenny Stabler’s favorite targets on the classic Raiders dynasty that defined the franchise.


9. Jason Witten, Cowboys (2003-12)
2-time first-team All-Pro
8-time Pro Bowler
806 catches for 8,948 yards (11.1 ypc) and 44 TDs

Four 1,000-yard seasons have put Witten in rarified air among tight ends. And the star on the helmet won’t hurt when it comes time to voting for the Hall of Fame.


10. Rob Gronkowski, Patriots (2010-12)
1-time first-team All-Pro
2-time Pro Bowler
187 catches for 2,663 yards (14.2 ypc) and 38 TDs

The “Gronk” posted the single greatest season ever by a tight end, with 90 catches for 1,327 yards (14.7 ypc) and 17 TDs in 2011. A 6’6”, 265-pound freak show on and off the field, the 23-year-old is the new Frankenstein monster prototype for NFL tight ends.



11. Jackie Smith, Cardinals (1963-77), Cowboys (’78)
Hall of Fame, Class of 1994
5-time Pro Bowler
480 catches for 7,918 yards (16.5 ypc) and 40 TDs
38 carries for 327 yards (8.6 ypc) and three TDs


12. Charlie Sanders, Lions (1968-77)
Hall of Fame, Class of 2007
3-time first-team All-Pro
7-time Pro Bowler
336 catches for 4,817 yards (14.3 ypc) and 31 TDs


13. Jerry Smith, Redskins (1965-77)
1-time first-team All-Pro
2-time Pro Bowler
421 catches for 5,496 yards (13.1 ypc) and 60 TDs


14. Ben Coates, Patriots (1991-99), Ravens (2000)
2-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
499 catches for 5,555 yards (11.1 ypc) and 50 TDs


15. Todd Christensen, Giants (1979), Raiders (’80-88)
2-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
461 catches for 5,872 yards (12.7 ypc) and 41 TDs


16. Keith Jackson, Eagles (1988-91), Dolphins (’92-94), Packers (’95-96)
3-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
441 catches for 5,283 yards (12.0 ypc) and 49 TDs


17. Jay Novacek, Cardinals (1985-89), Cowboys (’90-95)
1-time first-team All-Pro
5-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XXVII champion (Cowboys)
Super Bowl XXVIII champion (Cowboys)
Super Bowl XXX champion (Cowboys)
422 catches for 4,630 yards (11.0 ypc) and 30 TDs


18. Brent Jones, 49ers (1987-97)
4-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XXIII champion (49ers)
Super Bowl XXIV champion (49ers)
Super Bowl XXIX champion (49ers)
417 catches for 5,195 yards (12.5 ypc) and 33 TDs


19. Mark Bavaro, Giants (1985-90), Browns (’92), Eagles (’93-94)
2-time first-team All-Pro
2-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XXI champion (Giants)
Super Bowl XXV champion (Giants)
351 catches for 4,733 yards (13.5 ypc) and 39 TDs


20. Riley Odoms, Broncos (1972-83)
2-time first-team All-Pro
4-time Pro Bowler
396 catches for 5,755 yards (14.5 ypc) and 41 TDs
25 carries for 211 yards (8.4 ypc) and two TDs


21. Raymond Chester, Raiders (1970-72, ’78-81), Colts (’73-77)
4-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XV champion (Raiders)
364 catches for 5,013 yards (13.8 ypc) and 48 TDs


22. Dallas Clark, Colts (2003-11), Buccaneers (’12)
1-time first-team All-Pro
1-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XLI champion (Colts)
474 catches for 5,322 yards (11.2 ypc) and 50 TDs


23. Steve Jordan, Vikings (1982-94)
3-time first-team All-Pro
6-time Pro Bowler
498 catches for 6,307 yards (12.7 ypc) and 28 TDs


24. Billy Joe Dupree, Cowboys (1973-83)
3-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XII champion (Cowboys)
267 catches for 3,656 yards (13.4 ypc) and 41 TDs
26 rushes for 178 yards and one TD


25. Heath Miller, Steelers (2005-12)
2-time Pro Bowler
Super Bowl XL champion (Steelers)
Super Bowl XLIII champion (Steelers)
408 catches for 4,680 yards (11.5 ypc) and 39 TDs

Teaser:
<p> The 25 Greatest Tight Ends in NFL History, including Tony Gonzalez, Kellen Winslow, Mike Ditka, John Mackey, Shannon Sharpe, Antonio Gates, Ozzie Newsome, Dave Casper, Jason Witten, Rob Gronkowski, Jackie Smith, Charlie Sanders, Jerry Smith, Ben Coates, Todd Christiensen, Keith Jackson, Jay Novacek, Brent Jones, Mark Bavaro, Riley Odoms, Raymond Chester, Dallas Clark, Steve Jordan, Billy Joe Dupree and Heath Miller.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 06:40
Path: /nfl/nfl-playoffs-picks-against-spread-nfc-afc-championship-games
Body:

A betting preview (against the spread) in the NFC and AFC Championship Games of the NFL Playoffs.



Lock of the Week
The great Colin Kaepernick takes his one-man band on the road to Atlanta this weekend, after passing for 263 yards, rushing for 181 yards and scoring four total TDs in San Fran during his playoff debut. The 49ers fell just short of a trip to the Super Bowl last season but they’ll be headed to New Orleans after winning this week.

49ers (-5) at Falcons
Matt Ryan is much better at home (34–6 career record, including playoffs) than he is on the road (23–19 record). But this season, he has struggled statistically at home, throwing 13 TDs and 11 INTs at the Georgia Dome compared to 21 TDs and five INTs on the road. The Niners defense will bring too much heat for Matty Ice to handle.



Backdoor Cover
Baltimore was shown no respect last week in Denver, entering the Divisional Round game as a 10-point underdog before pulling off a 38–35 double-overtime victory. Ray Lewis’ retirement tour may not shock the world this week, but it won’t go down without a fight — especially in a rematch of last year’s painful AFC title game loss.

Ravens (+10) at Patriots
Joe Flacco is 7–4 in the playoffs, with his four losses coming at New England (23–20), at Pittsburgh (31–24), at Indianapolis (20–3) and at Pittsburgh (23–14). In other words, Flacco is 10–1 as a 10-point underdog.
 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Playoffs Picks Against the Spread: NFC, AFC Championship Games, featuring the San Francisco 49ers at Atlanta Falcons and the Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots.</p>
Post date: Friday, January 18, 2013 - 12:19
Path: /college-football/10-biggest-boom-or-bust-underclassmen-2013-nfl-draft
Body:

The deadline for underclassmen to declare for the 2013 NFL Draft was Jan. 15. The economic majors who can play ball decided to take the money and run. But not every name on the list is a can’t-miss blue-chip draft stock.

These are the 10 biggest boom or bust underclassmen in the 2013 NFL Draft:


1. Barkevious Mingo, DE/OLB, LSU
Is Mingo a 6’5”, 240-pound “Freak” in the mold of Jevon Kearse or Jason Pierre-Paul? Odds are there’s a team with a top-10 pick willing to bank on that chance — especially after watching the lightning fast Mingo run and jump in neon Under Armour at the NFL Scouting Combine, where coaches and GMs will be drooling over the hybrid edge rusher like Les Miles over Bermuda grass on a Saturday afternoon. But Mingo was never able to turn that in-shorts potential into in-pads production at LSU, with just 4.5 sacks this year while playing alongside several former five-stars and future first-rounders.


2. Sheldon Richardson, DT, Missouri
The big-talking big man who said the SEC, and Georgia in particular, played “old man football” has all the warning signs of a bust. All-world recruit with an ego as big as his massive frame? Check. Apparent lack of respect for authority or discipline? Check. History of shoulder injuries on a man soon to be paid to battle in the trenches? Check. Fast-rising prospect at the most bust-laden position, D-tackle? Check. Off-field issues as a cherry on top of the boom-or-bust sundae? Check yeah.


3. Marcus Lattimore, RB, South Carolina
There’s no doubt about the respect Lattimore has earned from his coaches, peers and fans during his time as arguably the nation’s top high school runner at Byrnes High School in Duncan, S.C., and collegiate back at South Carolina. The football community was emotionally crushed after watching Lattimore’s knee get physically smashed. And it was Lattimore’s second devastating knee injury in as many years. But Adrian Peterson just ran for 2,000 yards on a recently reconstructed knee, Willis McGahee bounced back from a brutal blow and Frank Gore is still a beast running on a pair of repaired legs.


4. Tyler Bray, QB, Tennessee
Classic case of a 6’6” quarterback with a million-dollar arm and a ten-cent head. It’s hard to blame the California kid who likes to chuck beer bottles at passing cars, though. After traveling cross-country to play for Lane Kiffin in Knoxville, his West Coast bro-coach bailed on him for USC. That left Bray holding the double-D-bag and playing for Derek Dooley. Well, not necessarily playing. Bray conveniently missed games against LSU (twice), Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, Arkansas and Oregon during the first two years of his injury-riddled career. His last two years, he went 2–10 in the SEC, including losses to Vanderbilt and Kentucky. But there’s no denying the arm; even Jeff George and Ryan Mallett are impressed by Bray.


5. Da’Rick Rogers, WR, Tennessee Tech
Once Bray’s go-to guy at Tennessee, the 6’3” jump-baller posted a 1,000-yard, nine-TD season in the SEC as a sophomore. But Rogers’ prima donna routine became expendable when Justin Hunter returned from injury and Cordarrelle Patterson arrived from JUCO to give the Volunteers more than enough NFL talent at wideout. After failed drug tests and indefinite suspensions, Rogers went to play for Mack Brown’s brother Watson Brown at Tennessee Tech, where the Georgia native had an 800-yard, 10-TD campaign against lesser FCS competition.


6. Tyrann Mathieu, CB/PR, LSU
The “Honey Badger” went from a cult hero Heisman Trophy finalist playing in the BCS national title game to the national spokesman for Spice synthetic weed. After watching this season from the couch and occasionally the stands, Mathieu hopes teams overlook his 5’9”, 175-pound frame — as well as a stack of off-field red flags at least that big — and focus on his unique playmaking ability as a nickel corner and punt returner. There was an intangible quality to Mathieu’s game in his heyday, but the tangible reality is that “Honey Badger” don’t care, and it may have cost him a lucrative NFL career.

 


7. William Gholston, DE, Michigan State
The 6’7”, 280-pound “Too Tall” is the cousin of Vernon Gholston, a former All-American at Ohio State who was selected No. 6 overall by the New York Jets in 2008. Vernon was an elephant man who wasn’t a freak so much as just ugly — as a player on the field and contract on the books. Unfortunately for William, he was nowhere near as productive as Vernon was in the Big Ten but he shares the last name “Gholston,” which is now synonymous with “bust” in certain draft circles.


8. Kwame Geathers, NT, Georgia
A big Dawg at 6’6”, 355-plus-pounds, Geathers is another namesake — as the brother of the Cincinnati Bengals’ Robert Geathers, brother of South Carolina’s Clifton Geathers, son of former NFL third-round pick Robert Geathers Sr., and nephew of 13-year NFL vet and two-time Super Bowl champion “Jumpy” Geathers. With that pedigree and so few nose guards to choose from for the ever-expanding list of teams running a 3-4 defense, Kwame Geathers will get over-drafted; hopefully not as bad as Kwame Brown was.


9. Greg Reid, CB/PR, Valdosta State
After getting kicked off of Florida State’s eventual Orange Bowl-winning squad, Reid suffered a season-ending knee injury before he could suit up for Valdosta State’s eventual Division II national title-winning team. If his run of bad decisions and bad luck comes to an end, Reid is the type of return man capable of breaking Deion Sanders’ FSU career record for punt return yards — which he was on pace to do before his quick-twitch exit from Tallahassee.


10. Brad Wing, P, LSU
Look out, you’ve got company, Chris Gardocki — who, by the by, was the last punter to declare early for the NFL Draft, back in 1991. The Bayou Bengal from Australia pinned himself into a coffin corner after being suspended for Honey-Badgering a drug test. So the 6’3”, 200-pounder entered the draft, where his Sebastian Janikowski attitude and success rate could make him a highly drafted, highly volatile special teams weapon. Don’t forget to watch out for the fake punt, either.

Teaser:
<p> 10 Biggest Boom or Bust Underclassmen in 2013 NFL Draft, including LSU defensive end Barkevious Mingo, Missouri defensive tackle Sheldon Richardson, South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore, Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray, Tennessee Tech receiver Da'Rick Rogers, LSU cornerback Tyrann Mathieu, Michigan State defensive end William Gholston, Georgia nose tackle Kwame Geathers, LSU punter Brad Wing and Valdosta State cornerback Greg Reid.</p>
Post date: Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 09:00
Path: /nfl/2013-nfl-playoff-picks-afc-nfc-championship-games
Body:

NFL Playoffs previews and predictions for the AFC and NFC Championship Games:


AFC Championship Game

Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots
Sunday, 6:30 p.m. ET, CBS

How the Ravens can win:
None other than Ray Lewis himself has put the weight of the world on the right shoulder of quarterback Joe Flacco. “You’re the General, lead us to victory,” Lewis told Flacco. “Smokin’ Joe” will need to deliver another knockout blow on the road against the AFC’s reigning heavyweight champion Patriots.

Flacco will have plenty of help, however, as home-run threat Torrey Smith and physical target Anquan Boldin line up out wide, while multi-threat running back Ray Rice and rookie runner Bernard Pierce handle the workload on the ground behind a solid O-line.

Although the offense will need to keep up on the scoreboard, the Ravens’ defense will be charged with containing Tom Brady and Co. The usual suspects of Lewis, safety Ed Reed, tackle Haloti Ngata and edge rusher Terrell Suggs will need to bring the heat in New England. In the end, it may come down to rookie kicker Justin Tucker, who will need to avoid the fate of Billy Cundiff, the goat of last year’s 23–20 AFC title game defeat in Foxborough.

How the Patriots can win:
Brady has more playoff wins than any other quarterback in history — with a 17–6 postseason record, including an 11–2 mark at home. Coach Bill Belichick will put the ball in Brady’s hands and let him work the magic that has already earned the duo five trips to the Super Bowl and three Vince Lombardi Trophies during their time in New England.

Tight end Rob Gronkowski is injured, but these Patriots are still loaded with playmakers like slot receiver Wes Welker and versatile tight end Aaron Hernandez. The power and speed backfield combo of Stevan Ridley and Shane Vereen has become nearly unstoppable as the season has worn on.

Defensively, 320-plus-pounder Vince Wilfork continues to anchor the unit, while playmakers like linebacker Jerod Mayo, hybrid end Chandler Jones and cornerback Aqib Talib fly around the field.

Kicker Stephen Gostkowski, punter Zoltan Mesko and a return game led by Welker and Devin McCourty round out a solid squad.

What will happen: New England by 5
Patriots march to Super Bowl XLVII; Ravens fly home for winter.


NFC Championship Game

San Francisco 49ers at Atlanta Falcons
Sunday, 3:00 p.m. ET, FOX

How the 49ers can win:
If dual-threat quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s second career playoff start is anything like his first, then San Francisco should cruise to Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans. Kaepernick posted 263 passing yards, 181 rushing yards and four total TDs against Green Bay in just his eighth career NFL start.

Coach Jim Harbaugh’s club is far from a one-man team. Veteran running back Frank Gore, wideout Michael Crabtree and tight end Vernon Davis have all had their own breakout playoff performances. And the Niners’ O-line is arguably the best in the business.

Defensively, San Francisco’s lineup reads like the NFC’s Pro Bowl roster, with All-Pro linebackers Patrick Willis, NaVorro Bowman and Aldon Smith, safeties Dashon Goldson and Donte Whitner, and end Justin Smith leading the charge.

Special teams was the Achilles’ heal of San Fran’s NFC title game effort last season and could be again this year, with kicker David Akers showing signs of physical and mental fatigue down the stretch.

How the Falcons can win:
Matt Ryan finally ripped the playoff monkey off his back, winning his first career postseason game in his fourth attempt. But he’s far from satisfied. It will be up to “Matty Ice” to keep his cool against an aggressive 49ers defense that will bring exotic blitz packages from their 3-4 scheme.

Ryan’s fleet of pass-catchers is easily the best remaining in the playoffs, as receivers Roddy White and Julio Jones are joined by future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez. In the backfield, Michael Turner has split more time with Jacquizz Rodgers of late, giving the Falcons a variety of offensive looks.

Atlanta’s defense will need to do to Gore what it did to Seattle’s Marshawn Lynch (16 carries, 46 yards) while not allowing Kaepernick to do what Russell Wilson (385 pass yards, 60 rush yards, 3 TDs) was able to do both through the air and on the ground.

Kicker Matt Bryant already has one playoff game-winner, giving coach Mike Smith confidence in what should be a close contest.

What will happen: San Francisco by 3
49ers strike Super Bowl gold; Falcons’ wings clipped at home.

 

Last week: 3-1 // Season: 178-86
 

Teaser:
<p> 2013 NFL Playoff Picks: AFC, NFC Championship Games, Previews of the Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots and San Francisco 49ers at Atlanta Falcons.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 23:58
Path: /nfl/colin-kaepernick-carries-49ers-nfc-championship-game
Body:

When placed directly in the spotlight of the NFL Playoffs, many players shrink amid the added scrutiny, while others shine brightest when given national attention.

Heading into San Francisco’s Divisional Round playoff showdown with Green Bay, no one was quite sure which type of player 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick would be.

The second-year dual-threat signal-caller out of Nevada was making just his eighth career start since replacing veteran Alex Smith — who led the Niners all the way to the NFC title game last year before being concussed in Week 10 this season and never reclaiming his starting job.

Clearly Kaepernick looked the part during the regular season — posting a 5–2 record while completing 62.4 percent of his passes for 1,814 yards, 10 TDs and three INTs for a 98.3 passer rating, while scrambling for 415 yards, on 6.6 yards per carry, and five TDs on the ground.

The playoffs, however, are a completely different animal. And Kaepernick was the youngest quarterback (25 years, 2 months, 9 nines) to start for San Francisco since Joe Montana (25 years, 6 months, 23 days).

Kaepernick looked his age early on, throwing an interception that was returned for a 52-yard TD by Packers cornerback Sam Shields, giving Green Bay an early 7–0 lead. But, as a young Joe Cool might have done, Kaepernick stayed calm and answered with an eight-play, 80-yard TD drive to tie the game at 7–7.

“He does a great job of responding. He has done that. Every time there’s been an interception that he’s thrown, or safety or turnover. He’s responded with a scoring drive. I think that’s rare. I think that’s a rare quality. And so far he’s shown that he’s got that ability to come back,” said 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, who was known as “Captain Comeback” during his playing days.

From that point on, Kaepernick was in total control of the 49ers offense and the Packers defense was helpless to stop San Fran’s new golden boy. Kaepernick completed 17-of-31 passes for 263 yards and two TDs, while running 16 times for 181 yards and two TDs en route to a 45–31 win. His 181 rushing yards broke both the NFL single-game and playoff game records for a quarterback, both of which were held by Michael Vick, as well as the 49ers’ team playoff record, held by Roger Craig.

And with running back Frank Gore adding 23 carries for 119 yards and one TD, the Niners’ play-action opened up the downfield passing game for wideout Michael Crabtree, who finished with nine catches for 119 yards and two TDs. The 49ers’ trio became the first in NFL history to post two 100-yard rushers and one 100-yard receiver in a playoff game. San Francisco also set team records for total yards (579) and rushing yards (323) in the process.

“Our offensive line played great today. They did a lot of things well up front. Our running backs ran well and our receivers made plays,” said Kaepernick, who joined Jay Cutler and Otto Graham as the only players in history to record two passing TDs and two rush TDs in a playoff game.

Kaepernick’s humility did little to shift the credit, however. There was no denying the impact of No. 7.

“He is a playmaker,” said 49ers tight end Vernon Davis. “He can run. He is athletic. He can throw. All the things you want in a quarterback, he has it.”

As for whether or not Kaepernick is a “running” quarterback, the former two-sport star who was drafted by MLB’s Chicago Cubs doesn’t bother worrying about labels.

“I don’t want to be categorized,” Kaepernick said after the game.

All Kaepernick seems to care about is being a big-time player — the type who rises to the occasion to make big plays in big games.
 

Teaser:
<p> Colin Kaepernick carries San Francisco 49ers to NFC Championship Game with record-breaking effort that included 263 passing yards, 181 rushing yards and four TDs during a 45-31 win over the Green Bay Packers.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 23:49
Path: /nfl/nfl-power-rankings-going-afc-nfc-championship-games
Body:

Athlon Sports' weekly rankings of NFL teams. The New England Patriots have taken over the top spot. Meanwhile, the Kansas City Chiefs remain locked into the No. 1 pick in this April's NFL Draft.

Here are our NFL Power Rankings following the NFL Playoffs' Divisional Round:



1. Patriots (13-4) Aim for sixth Super Bowl of Belichick-Brady era.

2. 49ers (12-4-1) Alex Smith who? Colin Kaepernick owns spotlight.

3. Falcons (14-3) Unintended onside kick ends thrilling win vs. Hawks.

4. Ravens (12-6) Return to site of last year’s AFC title game defeat.

5. Broncos (13-4) John Fox taking heat for taking knee to settle for OT.

6. Packers (12-6) Unable to double-check Colin Kaepernick in defeat.

7. Texans (13-5) Gary Kubiak, teammates “believe” in Matt Schaub.

8. Seahawks (12-6) Russell Wilson sets rookie QB playoff passing mark.

9. Redskins (10-7) NFLPA executive says FedEx Field a “safety issue.”

10. Bengals (10-7) Vontaze Burfict not fined for hit on Texans’ Graham.

11. Colts (11-6) Andrew Luck acts on NBC’s “Parks and Recreation.”

12. Vikings (10-7) Problems with Percy Harvin downplayed by GM.

13. Bears (10-6) Brandon Marshall an All-Pro in first year in Chicago.

14. Giants (9-7) Rookie David Wilson second-team All-Pro as KR.

15. Cowboys (8-8) Hire “Godfather of Tampa 2” Monte Kiffin as DC.

16. Steelers (8-8) Chris Rainey placed on waivers after being arrested.



17. Rams (7-8-1) Rob Ryan rumored to be near deal to be next DC.

18. Panthers (7-9) Cam Newton taking classes at Auburn in offseason.

19. Saints (7-9) New Orleans preps as host city of Super Bowl XLVII.

20. Dolphins (7-9) Promise to pay for half of redone Sun Life Stadium.

21. Chargers (7-9) Hire Broncos OC Mike McCoy as next head coach.

22. Buccaneers (7-9) Ronde Barber to take his time debating retirement.

23. Titans (6-10) Fire Alan Lowry, architect of “Music City Miracle.”

24. Bills (6-10) Hire Nathaniel Hackett as OC, Mike Pettine as DC.

25. Jets (6-10) Struggle to fill vacant GM position amid team turmoil.

26. Cardinals (5-11) Steve Keim named GM, turns attention to new coach.

27. Browns (5-11) Norv Turner to be OC under coach Rob Chudzinski.

28. Lions (4-12) Cliff Avril set for another offseason contract battle.

29. Eagles (4-12) Interview both Brian Billick and Ken Whisenhunt.

30. Raiders (4-12) Rolando McClain arrested, tells cops “F--- y’all.”

31. Jaguars (2-14) Not interested in Tim Tebow “even if he’s released.”

32. Chiefs (2-14) Will take “best player available” in draft, says GM.

 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Power Rankings Going Into AFC, NFC Championship Games, including the New England Patriots, San Francisco 49ers, Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Ravens, Denver Broncos, Green Bay Packers, Houston Texans, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Redskins, Cincinnati Bengals, Indianapolis Colts, Minnesota Vikings, Chicago Bears, New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers, St. Louis Rams, Carolina Panthers, New Orleans Saints and Miami Dolphins.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 20:49
Path: /nfl/nfl-playoffs-picks-against-spread-divisional-round
Body:

A betting preview of every game (against the spread) in the Divisional Round of the NFL Playoffs.

Lock of the Week
These two teams played in prime time six Sundays ago in Week 14 of the regular season, with New England beating Houston, 42–14. Expect another blowout this weekend.

Patriots (-10) vs. Texans
Tom Brady has a 16–6 career playoff record — one win shy of taking sole possession of first place (Joe Montana has a 16–7 postseason mark) on the all-time playoff wins list. At home, Brady carries a 10–2 playoff record at home, winning six of those contests by double-digits.


Straight Up Upset
The West Coast bias ended last week, when Seattle flew to D.C. to knock out RG3. The Dirty Birds are up next for the soaring Hawks, who are in Beast Mode at the moment.

Seahawks (+3) at Falcons
Atlanta quarterback Matt Ryan has thrown just 11 TDs and nine INTs at home this year. Matty Ice has been ice cold in the playoffs, failing to throw for over 200 yards, while tossing a combined three TDs and four INTs, while losing two fumbles and taking 10 sacks en route to an 0–3 record.


Backdoor Cover
This may be Ray Lewis’ last game — a fitting end with a matchup against all-time great and generational peer Peyton Manning. But don’t expect it to be a double-digit blowout.

Ravens (+10) at Broncos
Manning is 2–0 against Baltimore in the playoffs, with both wins coming as a member of the Colts. But he has struggled against the ball-hawking Ravens, throwing three picks to center field safety Ed Reed. With a healthy defense containing Manning, it will be up to Joe Flacco to survive Von Miller and the Mile High D.


Sucker Bet
Steer clear of this matchup unless you’re a degenerate or don’t feel right unless you’re wearing a Cheesehead or gold body paint — and have to have hometown playoff action.

49ers (-3) vs. Packers
San Francisco took down Green Bay, 30–22, at Lambeau Field in the Week 1 season opener. Alex Smith has since been replaced by Colin Kaepernick, who will be making his first career playoff start. Double-checking the other side, Aaron Rodgers has a 4–2 mark in the playoffs and is tough to bet against.

 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Playoffs Picks Against the Spread: Divisional Round, including the Baltimore Ravens at Denver Broncos, Houston Texans at New England Patriots, Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks at Atlanta Falcons.</p>
Post date: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 16:08
Path: /nfl/10-best-nfl-comeback-stories-season
Body:

None other than the great Dr. James Andrews has decided that Robert Griffin III will require total reconstructive surgery to repair the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and LCL (lateral collateral ligament) in his right knee. The roughly two-hour surgery took place on Wednesday, Jan. 9, and rehab for the Washington Redskins quarterback is expected to take anywhere between six-to-eight months.

But judging by a few recent miracles of modern science and other improbable returns, RG3 may be ready in plenty of time for the 2013 NFL season opener. These are the NFL’s top 10 comeback kings from this season — covering everything from physical injuries to damaged reputations to video game superstition and preconceived notions.


1. Peyton Manning, QB, Broncos
Injury Report: Neck injury requiring two vertebrae to be fused over the course of at least four separate surgical procedures
Initial Prognosis: Missed entire 2011 season with potentially career-ending injury
Actual Results: A five-year, $96 million contract with the Broncos, followed by a 13–3 record, No. 1 seed in the AFC Playoffs and possible fifth league MVP award


2. Adrian Peterson, RB, Vikings
Injury Report: Torn ACL, MCL in Week 16 of 2011
Initial Prognosis: Expected to miss start of 2012
Actual Results: Played all 16 games, becoming the seventh running back in history to rush for 2,000 yards, falling just short of Eric Dickerson’s all-time single-season record


3. Ray Lewis, LB, Ravens
Injury Report: Torn right triceps in Week 6 of 2012
Initial Prognosis: Expected to miss remainder of 2012, possibly force retirement
Actual Results: Made triumphant return in a Wild Card playoff victory over the Colts, giving the fans in Baltimore one last dance after announcing his pending retirement


4. Calvin Johnson, WR, Lions
Injury Report: Cursed after being placed on cover of Madden 13
Initial Prognosis: Would certainly follow in the footsteps of cursed former coverboys Vince Young, Brett Favre, Michael Vick and Peyton Hillis
Actual Results: Became the first receiver in NFL history to record 2,000 yards receiving, breaking Jerry Rice’s single-season record in the process


5. Russell Wilson, QB, Seahawks
Injury Report: Allegedly stands just over 5’10” tall
Initial Prognosis: Too small to see over O-line, clearly not an NFL starting QB
Actual Results: Drafted No. 75 overall before leading Seattle to playoffs, defeating RG3 head-to-head and becoming fifth rookie quarterback in history to win a postseason game


6. Chris Johnson, RB, Titans
Injury Report: Hamstrung by pockets full of money
Initial Prognosis: Loss of breakaway speed more confusing than CJ2K Twitter slang
Actual Results: Had longest TD run of his career (94 yards), became eighth running back in history to begin his career with five straight 1,000-yard seasons


7. Jonathan Vilma, LB, Saints
Injury Report: Taken out by Roger Goodell, as Gregg Williams’ “Kill the head” motto was adopted by the Commissioner
Initial Prognosis: Out indefinitely as ringleader of Saints’ Bounty Scandal
Actual Results: Returned to lineup in Week 7, backed by former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue, currently suing the Commissioner Goodell in a defamation lawsuit


8. Terrell Suggs, LB, Ravens
Injury Report: Torn Achilles tendon playing basketball in April 2012
Initial Prognosis: Pickup basketball career potentially over
Actual Results: Missed first six weeks of NFL season, returned to action in Week 7, started nine games including playoffs, hopes to play basketball again this summer


9. Janoris Jenkins, CB, Rams
Injury Report: Kicked off team at Florida, arrested three times, failed multiple drug tests, had four children by three different women
Initial Prognosis: Irreparable damage to reputation and draft stock
Actual Results: Became Jeff Fisher’s Pacman 2.0, drafted in the second round, shined with four INTs and four defensive TDs during a breakout rookie campaign

10. Randy Moss, WR, 49ers
Injury Report: “Straight cashed out, homey” in 2010
Initial Prognosis: League-wide black-listing after quitting on three teams in single season
Actual Results: Playing for the third-best team of his career with a chance to win his first Super Bowl and provide several more “Straight cash, homey,” reference opportunities

Teaser:
<p> 10 Best NFL Comeback Stories of This Season, including Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson, New Orleans Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma, Tennessee Titans running back Chris Johnson, Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and San Francisco 49ers wide receiver Randy Moss.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 - 15:00
Path: /nfl/2013-nfl-playoff-picks-divisional-round
Body:

NFL Playoffs previews and predictions for the Divisional Round:


AFC PLAYOFFS:

Ravens (11-6) at Broncos (13-3)
Saturday, CBS, 4:30 p.m. ET

Peyton Manning makes his return to the playoffs in what could be Ray Lewis’ final NFL game, as arguably the best offensive and defensive players of the last decade go head-to-head one last time. As a member of the Colts, Manning had a 2–0 postseason record against the Ravens — with a 20–3 win following the 2009 season in his last trip to the playoffs and a 15–6 victory after the 2006 season en route to winning his only Super Bowl title. Although he has won both of his matchups with Baltimore, Manning has not necessarily been the reason for victory — throwing for a combined 416 yards, two TDs and three INTs. All three of Manning’s picks against the Ravens have been thrown to center field safety Ed Reed, who has eight INTs in 12 career playoff games, one shy of the all-time record.

Broncos by 9


Texans (12-5) at Patriots (12-4)
Sunday, CBS, 4:30 p.m. ET

Three-time Super Bowl champion Tom Brady is one victory away from the all-time playoff wins record, currently held by Brady’s boyhood hero Joe Montana (16–7 playoff record; 14–5 with 49ers, 2–2 with Chiefs). This will be the second meeting in the last six weeks between Houston and New England. In Week 14, the Patriots marched to a 42–14 statement victory over the Texans, who carried a then-AFC-best 11–1 record. Including that loss, Houston quarterback Matt Schaub has thrown one TD and four INTs while posting a 2–3 record over the last five weeks. Brady was better than that, but not quite at his best down the stretch, throwing four of his eight total INTs in Weeks 15 and 16. Brady does, however, enter with the confidence of a 10–2 playoff record at home, while Schaub is making his first-ever playoff start on the road.

Patriots by 10



NFC PLAYOFFS:

Packers (12-5) at 49ers (11-4-1)
Saturday, FOX, 8 p.m. ET

In the season-opener back in Week 1, the Niners traveled to Lambeau Field to defeat the Packers, 30–22. San Francisco took an early 10–0 lead and carried a 23–7 lead into the fourth quarter before Green Bay rallied to within one score and two-point conversion away from a tie in the fourth quarter. In that game, 49ers quarterback Alex Smith threw two TDs in a near flawless effort. Since then, however, Smith has been replaced with second-year dual-threat Colin Kaepernick, who went 5–2 as a starter, including a 3–0 mark at home. While Kaepernick is making his first playoff start, Packers signal-caller Aaron Rodgers carries a 4–2 postseason record and a championship belt celebration following a victory in Super Bowl XLV.

49ers by 1


Seahawks (12-5) at Falcons (13-3)
Sunday, FOX, 1 p.m. ET

Much has been made of Matt Ryan’s 0–3 record in the playoffs, and rightly so. In three postseason defeats — at New York (24–2), vs. Green Bay (48–21) and at Arizona (30–24), respectively — Ryan has never thrown for even 200 yards in a single game. Meanwhile, he has thrown a combined three TDs and four INTs, while losing two fumbles and taking 10 sacks. In fairness, his losses have come against Eli Manning, Aaron Rodgers and Kurt Warner, three passers who have a combined four Super Bowl wins. This time around, Ryan will square off against rookie Russell Wilson, who is 4–5 on the road, 1–2 in domes and 2–2 in the Eastern Time Zone this season — but does have a playoff win already.

Falcons by 1

 

Last week: 3-1 // Season: 175-85
 

Teaser:
<p> 2013 NFL Playoff Picks: Divisional Round, including Baltimore Ravens at Denver Broncos, Houston Texans at New England Patriots, Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks at Atlanta Falcons.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 18:26
Path: /nfl/nfl-power-rankings-going-divisional-round-playoffs
Body:

Athlon Sports' weekly rankings of NFL teams. The Denver Broncos and Atlanta Falcons head into the playoffs as the No. 1 seeds in the AFC and NFC, respectively. Meanwhile, the Kansas City Chiefs have locked up the No. 1 pick in the NFL Draft.

Here are our NFL Power Rankings following the NFL Playoffs' Wild Card Weekend:



1. Broncos (13-3) Peyton Manning 2–0 vs. Ravens in postseason.

2. Falcons (13-3) Haven’t won playoff game since Mike Vick was QB.

3. Patriots (12-4) Tom Brady puts 16–6 postseason record on the line.

4. 49ers (11-4-1) Colin Kaepernick to make first career playoff start.

5. Packers (12-5) Chico’s own Aaron Rodgers going back to California.

6. Texans (13-4) Arian Foster Twitter avatar now critical column pic.

7. Ravens (11-6) Ray Lewis victorious in final Baltimore home game.

8. Seahawks (12-5) Russell Wilson fifth rookie QB to earn playoff victory.

9. Redskins (10-7) Shanahan, Andrews dispute handling of RG3 injury.

10. Bengals (10-7) Marvin Lewis’ career postseason record falls to 0–4.

11. Colts (11-6) Bruce Arians hospitalized, misses loss at Baltimore.

12. Vikings (10-7) Joe Webb replaces Christian Ponder, struggles in loss.

13. Bears (10-6) Getting crazy eyes for interviewing Mike Singletary.

14. Giants (9-7) Jason Pierre-Paul to seek help from Michael Strahan.



15. Cowboys (8-8) Tony Romo taunted by NHL’s Dallas Stars on Twitter.

16. Steelers (8-8) OC Todd Haley debating interview for Cardinals’ job.

17. Rams (7-8-1) Williams boys, Gregg and Blake, let go in St. Louis.

18. Panthers (7-9) X-rays on Cam Newton’s ribs, left ankle negative.

19. Saints (7-9) Sean Payton reportedly signs richest deal in NFL.

20. Dolphins (7-9) Owner Stephen Ross backs Philbin-Tannehill duo.

21. Chargers (7-9) To settle on GM before making next coaching hire.

22. Buccaneers (7-9) Josh Freeman contract not extended by Tampa Bay.

23. Titans (6-10) Chris Johnson guaranteed $9 million bonus Feb. 9.

24. Bills (6-10) Hire Doug Marrone as franchise’s 16th head coach.

25. Jets (6-10) Rex Ryan has tattoo of wife in Mark Sanchez jersey.

26. Cardinals (5-11) Darnell Dockett types tweet nothings during BCS title.

27. Browns (5-11) Chip Kelly backs off NFL, headed back to Oregon.

28. Lions (4-12) Calvin Johnson career year defies “Madden Curse.”

29. Eagles (4-12) Set to interview Bengals’ Jay Gruden. Is Jon next?

30. Raiders (4-12) Dennis Allen to coach North team in Senior Bowl.

31. Jaguars (2-14) Mike Mularkey status uncertain until new GM hired.

32. Chiefs (2-14) Andy Reid to coach, make personnel moves in K.C.
 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Power Rankings Going Into Divisional Round of Playoffs, including the Denver Broncos, Atlanta Falcons, New England Patriots, San Francisco 49ers, Green Bay Packers, Houston Texans, Baltimore Ravens, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Redskins, Cincinnati Bengals, Indianapolis Colts, Minnesota Vikings, Chicago Bears, New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 18:15
Path: /nfl/ray-lewis-says-goodbye-baltimore-prepares-peyton-manning
Body:

High-stepping, sliding, throwing his fists back and pointing his chest to the sky to let out one final battle cry, Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis made his triumphant return from injury as well as his last appearance as a player in front of the home crowd at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore during a Wild Card Weekend showdown with the Indianapolis Colts.

And he did so in style, with his signature dance during pregame introductions and on the field in the final seconds of a 24–9 victory, prior to taking a victory lap to say goodbye to the fans who have supported the Super Bowl MVP and two-time Defensive Player of the Year during his 17 seasons, all with the Ravens.

“I knew how it started, but I never knew how it was going to end here in Baltimore,” said Lewis. “For it to go the way it went today, I wouldn’t change anything.”

Commissioner Roger Goodell was in attendance to hug the future Hall of Famer prior to kickoff, in Lewis’ first action since suffering a torn triceps on Oct. 14 in Week 6. The 37-year-old didn’t miss a beat, with 13 total tackles and a near-interception of Indianapolis rookie quarterback Andrew Luck.

“He played well. He was physical at the point of attack. He did a good job in the pass game,” said Ravens coach John Harbaugh. “Really nothing negative. He played a good, solid game.”

Chants of, “Thank you, Ray!” rained down from the purple-clad crowd with the game decided late in the fourth quarter, as the fans in Baltimore said a collective goodbye to their franchise’s greatest player.

“It was one of those great moments. I felt so proud of our fans. So pleased that we all have something that we will be able to talk to our kids and our grandkids about,” said Harbaugh.

“A Baltimore football moment that is going to just live on. That’s kind of why you do this — it’s kind of why you’re a fan, to be a part of moments like this.”

Now the Ravens hit the road to take on the Denver Broncos in the Divisional Round of the AFC Playoffs. The game is a rematch of a Week 15 contest won, 34–17, by Denver.

And in order to take down the stampeding Broncos — who have won 11 straight since staggering to a 2–3 start — the Ravens defense will have to outplay Peyton Manning, the four-time MVP quarterback and current MVP candidate who Baltimore safety Bernard Pollard recently compared to a “MacBook” computer.

“He’s not a computer, that’s for sure. He may have a computer for a brain, but he’s a man. We’re going to try to confuse him, and we’re going to need to try to put pressure on him,” said Harbaugh. “It’s a great analogy.”

In what could be his final game in the NFL, Lewis will lead the Ravens against arguably the greatest passer of his (or any) generation. Manning vs. Lewis, winner takes all, loser goes home — for good, in Lewis’ case.

“It’s just one of those chess matches,” said Lewis. “He knows me very well. I know them very well.”

Much has changed since the Raven’s defeat four weeks ago. Baltimore was without Lewis, Pollard and guard Marshal Yanda in that contest, while linebacker Terrell Suggs was playing his first game back from injury and Jim Caldwell was in his first game as the team’s play-caller after replacing Cam Cameron as the team’s offensive coordinator. Baltimore is back full strength headed to Denver for revenge. That’s all they can ask.

“We saw them earlier in the year, but now we get them again with all of our guys back,” said Lewis. “We are really looking forward to it.”
 

Teaser:
<p> Baltimore Ravens middle linebacker Ray Lewis played his final home game at M&amp;T Bank Stadium in a win over the Indianapolis Colts, now he prepares to take on Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning in what could be Lewis' final game in the NFL.</p>
Post date: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 17:52
Path: /nfl/nfl-playoffs-picks-against-spread-wild-card-weekend
Body:

A betting preview of each of every game (against the spread) on Wild Card Weekend in the NFL Playoffs.


Lock of the Week
Win or lose, this is Ray Lewis' last dance in front of the home crowd in Baltimore, expect the city's new team to soar past its former franchise.

Ravens (-6.5) vs. Colts
For all the flak Joe Flacco has taken over the years, he has a 5–4 record in the playoffs with at least one postseason win in each of his four years in the NFL. Andrew Luck is trying to join Flacco, Ben Roethlisberger, Mark Sanchez and Shaun King as only the fifth rookie quarterback to ever win a playoff game.


Straight Up Upset
A rookie starting quarterback is guaranteed a win in this game, as league posterboy Robert Griffin III takes on everyone's underdog Russell Wilson.

Redskins (+3) vs. Seahawks
Seattle was an impressive 8–0 at home this season, but carried a 3–5 mark on the road. Historically, the Seahawks have lost eight consecutive postseason games on the road and have not won a road playoff game since Dec. 31, 1983. Only nine players on the current 53-man roster were even alive then.


Backdoor Cover
These NFC North division rivals are playing for the second consecutive week and for the third time in the past six weeks. These teams are familiar foes.

Vikings (+9) at Packers
In Week 17, Minnesota knocked off Green Bay, 37–34; in Week 13, the Packers beat the Vikings, 23–14. Over the past three seasons, Minnesota has a 4–2 record vs. Green Bay against a similar spread. Plus, Adrian Peterson has run wild for 409 yards and three total TDs against the Packers this season.


Sucker Bet
Stay away completely, unless you are a hometown homer or a degenerate who has to have action on every game in the playoffs no matter what.

Texans (-5) vs. Bengals
Sure, this is a rematch of last year's AFC Wild Card, which Houston won 31–10 over Cincinnati. But the Texans have lost three of its last four contests and quarterback Matt Schaub — who has thrown one TD and three INTs during the 1–3 stretch run — will be making the first playoff start of his career.

Teaser:
<p> A betting preview of each of every game (against the spread) on Wild Card Weekend in the NFL Playoffs, including the Indianapolis Colts at Baltimore Ravens, Seattle Seahawks at Washington Redskins, Minnesota Vikings at Green Bay Packers and Cincinnati Bengals at Houston Texans.</p>
Post date: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 12:56
Path: /nfl/peyton-manning-adrian-peterson-battle-mvp-comeback-player-year
Body:

With the 2012 NFL regular season in the books, it’s time to hand out awards to the league’s top talent. This year, there are more players deserving recognition than there are trophies to hand out. However, these are the select few Athlon Sports believes to be award-worthy:

Most Valuable Player
Peyton Manning, QB, Broncos
After missing the entire 2011 season following four neck surgeries, Manning returned to his four-time MVP form in 2012. In his 15th year in the league, but first as a member of the Broncos, the 36-year-old future Hall of Famer had the second-best statistical season of his storied career — passing for 4,659 yards (42 yards shy of his single-season best), 37 TDs (second-most of his career) and only 11 INTs (third-fewest of his career) for a 105.8 passer rating (second-highest of his career).

Offensive Player of the Year
Adrian Peterson, RB, Vikings
Against all odds, Peterson stormed back from a brutal knee injury suffered on Christmas Eve last season. Peterson became the seventh player in history to rush for over 2,000 yards in a single season — with 348 carries for 2,097 yards, on a league-leading 6.0 yards per carry, and 12 TDs, while also hauling in 40 catches for 217 yards and one TD through the air.

Defensive Player of the Year
J.J. Watt, DE, Texans
With respect to Denver’s Von Miller and San Francisco’s Aldon Smith, Houston’s second-year behemoth out of Wisconsin was the most dominant all-around defender in the NFL this year. Commanding constant double-teams, Watt tallied 81 total tackles, including 69 solo stops, with 20.5 sacks, a record 16 pass deflections and four forced fumbles.



Offensive Rookie of the Year
Robert Griffin III, QB, Redskins
RG3 headlines a crowded category that also includes Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, Redskins running back Alfred Morris and Buccaneers running back Doug Martin. But the Heisman Trophy winner deserves to take home the hardware — with 3,200 passing yards, 20 TDs and five INTs for a 102.4 passer rating, along with 815 rushing yards and seven TDs.

Defensive Rookie of the Year
Bobby Wagner, LB, Seahawks
Seattle’s second-round pick (No. 47 overall) was a relatively obscure middle linebacker out of Utah State who has developed into one of the leaders of the ball-Hawks from the Pacific Northwest. A playmaking threat from sideline-to-sideline, Wagner has notched 140 total tackles, three INTs and two sacks while starting 15 games for the Seahawks.

Co-Comeback Players of the Year
Peyton Manning, QB, Broncos
Adrian Peterson, RB, Vikings

Manning and Peterson both had seemingly super-human MVP-worthy comeback campaigns. In fact, they might be the best two injury bounce-backs in NFL history. Break out the scalpel and cut this award in half.

Coach of the Year
Bruce Arians, Colts
The former Steelers playcaller was charged with taking over the top spot in Indy on an interim basis after the leukemia diagnosis of first-year coach Chuck Pagano. Arians responded with a 9–3 record and playoff berth.

Executive of the Year
John Elway, Broncos
The Broncos’ boss man lassoed Peyton Manning in the offseason — one year after drafting Defensive Player of the Year candidate Von Miller. This one’s for John.
 

Teaser:
<p> Peyton Manning and Adrian Peterson Battle For MVP and Comeback Player of the Year, while Robert Griffin III, Andrew Luck, Russell Wilson and Alfred Morris fight for Offensive Rookie of the Year, and J.J. Watt, Von Miller and Aldon Smith vie for Defensive Player of the Year.</p>
Post date: Thursday, January 3, 2013 - 06:26
Path: /nfl/2013-nfl-playoff-picks-wild-card-weekend
Body:

NFL Playoffs previews and predictions for Wild Card Weekend:



AFC PLAYOFFS
Byes: Broncos, Patriots

Bengals (10-6) at Texans (12-4)
Saturday, 4:30 p.m. ET, NBC

Houston defensive end J.J. Watt had a coming out party in last year’s 31–10 Wild Card win over Cincinnati. Then a rookie, Watt had one sack, one INT returned 29 yards for a TD and one of his now famous J.J. swats to bat a ball down at the line of scrimmage. Watt followed that effort with a 12-tackle, 2.5-sack performance against in a Divisional Round defeat at Baltimore. But after 3.5 sacks and a pick-six in his first two playoff games, it’s safe to say that Watt likes the bright lights of the postseason.

Offensively, the Texans’ two-headed monster of running back Arian Foster and wide receiver Andre Johnson have been nearly impossible to stop this season. Foster has 1,641 total yards and 17 total TDs, while Johnson recently joined Marvin Harrison as the only players in history with four seasons with at least 100 catches and 1,500 yards.

The Bengals’ second-year pitch-and-catch duo of quarterback Andy Dalton and wide receiver A.J. Green is also a tough tandem. Green has been particularly difficult to cover this season, with at least 100 yards or one TD in 12 games.

Texans by 6


Colts (11-5) at Ravens (10-6)
Sunday, 1 p.m. ET, CBS

The Colts return to Baltimore, where the team played from 1953-83 before packing up the Mayflower moving trucks and heading for Indy in 1984. Football returned to Baltimore in 1996, when the Browns moved from Cleveland and became the Ravens.

This will be the third playoff meeting between the Colts and Ravens since 2007. The Colts won both games, with a 20–3 win in Indianapolis in 2010 and a 15–6 victory at Baltimore in 2007. The last time these two squared off, Colts coach Chuck Pagano was the Ravens defensive coordinator, while Baltimore offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell was the coach in Indianapolis.

This will be the first postseason start for Colts rookie quarterback Andrew Luck and possibly the last game for Ravens veteran middle linebacker Ray Lewis, who has announced his intentions to retire following this season’s playoffs. Luck will need to keep his eyes on Baltimore ball-hawk Ed Reed, who has eight INTs for 162 return yards and one TD in 11 career playoff games.

Colts by 1



NFC PLAYOFFS
Byes: Falcons, 49ers

Vikings (10-6) at Packers (11-5)
Saturday, 8 p.m. ET, NBC

This AFC North division rivalry is between two familiar opponents who squared off in Week 17 — with Minnesota taking a 37–34 victory over Green Bay on a 29-yard game-winning FG by rookie Blair Walsh as time expired. In Week 13, the Packers defended Lambeau Field with a 23–14 win over the Vikings.

The season series was split, but there was one common thread in both contests. Adrian Peterson rushed for 210 yards and one TD outdoors in Green Bay and then had 199 rush yards and two total TDs in the dome at Minnesota. Peterson giving the Packers defense fits “All Day” isn’t a new trend, either. Last year, A.D. rushed for 175 yards and one TD in a loss; in 2010, he had 171 total yards and one TD in defeat.

But Green Bay will reluctantly allow Peterson to keep posting eye-popping numbers if quarterback Aaron Rodgers can continue a trend of his own. The discount double-checker is 5–1 against the Vikings over the last three seasons. More impressive, Rodgers has not lost back-to-back games since December 2010.

Packers by 5


Seahawks (11-5) at Redskins (10-6)
Sunday, 4:30 p.m. ET, FOX

The battle of rookie starting quarterbacks pits everyone’s favorite television spokesman and nicknamed hyperbole machine Robert Griffin III — known as RG3 to the hip fans who made his No. 10 jersey the all-time single-season record holder in sales — against the ultimate underdog Russell Wilson, a two-sport star who played for two schools (NC State, Wisconsin) before landing in Seattle.

Although their draft positions may be different (RG3 went No. 2, Wilson went No. 75 overall), both signal-callers have relied on similar dual-threat athleticism and mistake-free maturity to succeed. And as a result, both the Skins and Hawks are playing their best ball when it matters most. Washington has won seven consecutive games since its Week 10 bye, while Seattle has won five straight and seven of its last eight.

But history is not on the side of the Seahawks, who have lost eight straight playoff road games dating back to Dec. 31, 1983. Only nine Hawks on the current 53-man roster were even alive then.



Seahawks by 2


Last week: 12–4 // Season: 172-84
 

Teaser:
<p> 2013 NFL Playoff Picks: Wild Card Weekend, including the Cincinnati Bengals at Houston Texans, Indianapolis Colts at Baltimore Ravens, Minnesota Vikings at Green Bay Packers and Seattle Seahawks at Washington Redskins.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 19:48
Path: /nfl/nfl-power-rankings-going-wild-card-weekend
Body:

Athlon Sports' weekly rankings of NFL teams. The Atlanta Falcons and Denver Broncos head into the playoffs as the No. 1 seeds in the NFC and AFC, respectively. Meanwhile, the Kansas City Chiefs have locked up the No. 1 pick in the NFL Draft.

Here are our NFL Power Rankings following Week 17 of the season:



1. Falcons (13-3) John Abraham injures ankle in meaningless defeat.

2. Broncos (13-3) Eleventh straight win clinches No. 1 seed in playoffs.

3. Patriots (12-4) Rob Gronkowski scores in return from forearm injury.

4. 49ers (11-4-1) Clinch first-round bye with win plus Packers’ loss.

5. Texans (12-4) J.J. Watt falls two sacks shy of single-season record.

6. Packers (11-5) Lose at Minnesota, set to host rematch at Lambeau.

7. Seahawks (11-5) Russell Wilson ties rookie TD pass record (26) in win.

8. Redskins (10-6) RG3 plays through pain, leads Skins to playoffs.

9. Ravens (10-6) Ray Lewis returns for “last ride” before retirement.

10. Colts (11-5) Chuck Pagano victorious in first game back in Indy.

11. Bengals (10-6) Hope playoff rematch in Houston has happy ending.

12. Vikings (10-6) Adrian Peterson makes history, playoffs in victory.

13. Bears (10-6) Lovie Smith fired, Mike Ditka calls the move “stupid.”

14. Giants (9-7) Too little, too late for reigning Super Bowl champs.

15. Cowboys (8-8) Tony Romo throws season-ending INT vs. Redskins.

16. Steelers (8-8) Mike Tomlin avoids first losing season with victory.



17. Rams (7-8-1) One win away from first winning season since 2003.

18. Panthers (7-9) Win four straight, five of last six, to finish season.

19. Saints (7-9) Drew Brees first ever with three 5,000-yard years.

20. Dolphins (7-9) Fourth straight losing season ends in shutout loss.

21. Chargers (7-9) Pull the plug on coach Norv Turner, GM A.J. Smith.

22. Buccaneers (7-9) Muscle Hamster finishes with 1,454 yards, 11 TDs.

23. Titans (6-10) First ever with two players to score two return TDs.

24. Bills (6-10) Fire Chan Gailey; establishing analytics department.

25. Jets (6-10) Rex Ryan leaves town with job intact — for now.

26. Cardinals (5-11) Ken Whisenhunt fired after losing 11 of last 12 games.

27. Browns (5-11) Ready to hire sixth coach since 1999 return to NFL.

28. Lions (4-12) Calvin Johnson falls 36 yards short of 2K campaign.

29. Eagles (4-12) Andy Reid fired after 130–93–1 record in 14 seasons.

30. Raiders (4-12) Dennis Allen fires OC Greg Knapp after down year.

31. Jaguars (2-14) Is it Tim Tebow time now that season is finally over?

32. Chiefs (2-14) Fire Romeo Crennel, status of Scott Pioli uncertain.
 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Power Rankings Going Into Wild Card Weekend, including the Atlanta Falcons, Denver Broncos, New England Patriots, San Francisco 49ers, Houston Texans, Green Bay Packers, Seattle Seahawks, Washington Redskins, Baltimore Ravens, Indianapolis Colts, Cincinnati Bengals, Minnesota Vikings, Chicago Bears, New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 19:20
Path: /college-football/outback-bowl-preview-and-prediction-south-carolina-vs-michigan
Body:

It’s always fresh in the Outback is a steakhouse slogan that doubles for the bloomin’ bowl game. The SEC vs. Big Ten matchup has been one of the best non-BCS bowls in recent years. Since 2000, three games have gone to overtime — including last year’s triple-overtime classic between Michigan State and Georgia — and eight have been contests decided by one-score margins.

In this year’s game, Michigan will be wearing alternate uniforms — the eighth jersey color scheme combination since Brady Hoke took over college football’s winningest program last season. Luckily for traditionalists who “Hail to the Victors,” the Wolverines will still be wearing their classic winged helmets.

Outback Bowl — South Carolina (10–2) vs. Michigan (8–4)

Date and Time: Jan. 1 at 1 p.m. ET
Network: ESPN
Location: Tampa, Fla.

When the South Carolina Gamecocks have the ball:

Ol’ ball coach Steve Spurrier has been pitching-and-catching less at South Carolina than he did during his Fun n’ Gun days at Florida. That was easier before star junior tailback Marcus Lattimore suffered a devastating knee injury against Tennessee on Oct. 27.

Without Lattimore, South Carolina has turned to playmakers like receivers Ace Sanders and Bruce Ellington — who have a combined to haul in 27 catches for 367 yards and five TDs in the three games since Lattimore went down.

A less serious injury, to dual-threat starting quarterback Connor Shaw’s left foot, forced the Gamecocks to take to the air with backup Dylan Thompson, who attempted 41 passes and threw three TDs during a 27–17 win over rival Clemson. Although Shaw is expected to start, Spurrier will return to his Gator-armed days of keeping a short leash on his passers by implementing a two-quarterback gameplan that also features Thompson.

Michigan will be playing without several defenders, having senior cornerback J.T. Floyd and senior linebacker Brandin Hawthorne, along with Big Ten punter of the year Will Hagerup, all to suspension. The U-M’s No. 57-ranked rush defense (156.0 ypg) will be tested, but defensive coordinator Greg Mattison’s No. 16 scoring defense (18.3 ppg) has been bending without breaking all season, allowing over 21 points just four times.

When the Michigan Wolverines have the ball:

By far the best individual matchup of the entire bowl season will take place between a pair of AP first-team All-Americans in the trenches. Michigan left tackle Taylor Lewan (6’8”, 310) and South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney (6’6”, 255) will have NFL scouts packing Raymond James Stadium for a peek at two elite first-round prospects. Clowney led the nation with 13 sacks and 21.5 tackles for a loss as a sophomore and is hoping to enter 2013 as a Heisman Trophy candidate. 

“I believe a defensive player can win the Heisman next year. … That’s my next thing, New York,” said Clowney, who could kick start his campaign with a big game against Lewan.

Michigan will be without running back Fitz Toussaint due to a broken leg, but the dynamic quarterback duo of Devin Gardner and Denard Robinson should be able to pick up the slack. Gardner took over the starting quarterback job after an arm injury suffered by Robinson. In just four games, Gardner has thrown for 1,005 yards, eight TDs and four INTs, while scrambling for 77 yards and another seven TDs on the ground and posting a 3–1 record.

But since this is the last game in Maize-and-Blue for “Shoelace” as well as a Florida homecoming for the Deerfield Beach native, don’t be surprised if Michigan opens up the playbook for the school’s all-time leader in total yards (10,669) and total TDs (91). Robinson has thrown for 1,319 yards, rushed for 1,166 yards and accounted for 16 total TDs. Used exclusively as a runner in the last two games, Denard X posted 23 carries for 220 yards, on 9.6 yards per carry, and one TD.

Final Analysis

South Carolina lost only twice this season, in a 23–21 tight fight in Death Valley at LSU and a 44–11 blowout in The Swamp at Florida the following week. Meanwhile, Michigan lost twice as many games, but against elite competition — Alabama (41–14), at Notre Dame (13–6), at Nebraska (23–9) and at Ohio State (26–21).  Together, the Gamecocks and Wolverines lost to six teams with a combined 67–7 record.

These are two of the more competitive, battle-tested teams in the country. Expect another close call in this year’s Outback Bowl, with the Clowney and the Gamecocks defense doing just enough to tangle Shoelace and the Wolverines offense.

Prediction: South Carolina 27, Michigan 24


Related College Football Content

A Very Early College Football Top 25 for 2013
Capital One Bowl Preview and Prediction: Georgia vs. Nebraska

Orange Bowl Preview and Prediction: Florida State vs. Northern Illinois

Rose Bowl Preview and Prediction: Wisconsin vs. Stanford

Teaser:
<p> Outback Bowl Preview and Prediction: South Carolina vs. Michigan</p>
Post date: Monday, December 31, 2012 - 06:41
Path: /nfl/top-10-internet-memes-sports-2012
Body:

This year, countless Internet memes went viral. But the world of sports saw some of the best. Here is a rundown of the top 10 best Internet memes in sports in 2012.


1. McKayla Is Not Impressed
Arguably the No. 1 meme of 2012, regardless of genre. "McKayla Is Not Impressed" was the gold medal meme of the London Olympics, after McKayla Maroney was disappointed with her silver medal in the individual vault — after already taking home gold with Team USA's "Fierce Five."


2. Smokin’ Jay Cutler
Chicago Bears gunslinger Jay Cutler's bad body language and disgusted looks of frustration have been great for the internet. Look out, Marlboro Man and Joe Camel, "Smokin' Jay Cutler" has become the new face of big tobacco.


3. Eli Manning Looking At Things
New York Giants two-time Super Bowl champion quarterback Eli Manning is known for his laid back attitude. No matter how big the stage or how bright the lights, Peyton's little bro keeps his cool. "Eli Manning Looking At Things" shows just how slow his pulse can be sometimes.


4. Mo Farah Running Away From Things
The gold medalist in the 5,000- and 10,000-meters at the London Olympics, the Somali-born British track star is a veteran of distancing himself from the pack. So, "Mo Farah Running Away From Things" was a natural fit, just ask Pamela Anderson and the cast of Baywatch.


5. Manny Pacquiao KO’d
Pacman lost to Mexico's Juan Manuel Marquez by sixth-round KO in early December, costing the Filipino prize fighter the fifth loss of his amazing career. It also prompted internet shadow boxers to speed-bag a few memes of Manny hitting the mat.



6. Good Job, Good Effort
After a Miami Heat loss to the Boston Celtics in Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Finals, nine-year-old superfan Jack Meyer took it upon himself to cheer up LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Co. by rapid-firing "Good job, good effort!" as the team went to the locker room. Miami rallied from the 3-2 deficit to beat Boston and ultimately win the NBA championship, but by then the "Good job, good effort" kid was already internet famous.


7. Queen Elizabeth at Olympic Opening Ceremonies
Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, was in the stands at the London Olympic Opening Ceremonies. Of course she was. And, of course, people quickly started taking screen shots and mocking her royal highness. God meme the queen.


8. Derrick Rose's ACL Injury
When Chicago Bulls superstar Derrick Rose heard his ACL pop in the first round of the NBA Playoffs against the Philadelphia 76ers, the entire city of Chicago, along with Bulls fans from coast-to-coast felt like Simba did when his father Mufasa died in Disney's The Lion King.


9. Fat Derek Jeter
One of the prices paid by Derek Jeter is constantly having his picture taken — whether he has his arm around the waist of a supermodel, actress or pop star, or is carrying a few extra pounds around his waist while strolling in a walking boot poolside in South Beach a month after ankle surgery.


10. Anthony Davis’ Unibrow
It doesn't take much web surfing to find out that Kentucky phenom Anthony Davis was named National Player of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Freshman of the Year and Final Four MOP, leading John Calipari to his first-ever national championship before being the No. 1 overall pick in the NBA Draft — and he also has a unibrow.
 

Teaser:
<p> Top 10 Internet Memes in Sports in 2012, including McKayla is not impressed, Smokin' Jay Cutler, Eli Manning looking at things, Mo Farah running away from things, Manny Pacquiao knocked out, Queen Elizabeth at the London Olympic Opening Ceremonies, the "Good Job, Good Effort" kid, fat Derek Jeter and Anthony Davis' unibrow.</p>
Post date: Monday, December 31, 2012 - 06:05
Path: /college-football/sun-bowl-preview-and-prediction-georgia-tech-vs-usc
Body:

Preseason No. 1 USC started the year chasing the school’s 12th national championship, to take care of what senior quarterback Matt Barkley called “unfinished business.” But following a two-year postseason ban, the Trojans are not playing for the BCS crystal in Miami — which, ironically, is the city where the man whose transgressions the Men of Troy paid for, Reggie Bush, is currently paid to play football.

Instead, USC is off to the West Texas border town of El Paso to face Georgia Tech, a program with a losing record in 2012 and in the midst of a seven-bowl losing streak. But with so much NFL talent on the field and a chip on their shoulder — not to mention a 0–2 record of their own in the Sun Bowl — the Trojans still have plenty to play for.

USC should want to go out with a bang not a whimper, to show the sarcastic skeptics exactly why the Trojans were once considered the top team in the land.

Sun Bowl — USC (7–5) vs. Georgia Tech (6–7)

Date and Time: Dec. 31 at 2 p.m. ET
Network: CBS
Location: El Paso, Texas

When the USC Trojans have the ball:

Barkley began the season as the Heisman Trophy favorite and projected No. 1 overall pick in the 2013 NFL Draft. After throwing for a career-worst 15 INTs, Barkley suffered a sprained AC joint in his right throwing arm in a loss against UCLA and was forced to sit out his final home game at the L.A. Coliseum against No. 1 Notre Dame. And USC’s all-time leading passer was not cleared to play in the Sun Bowl, which means Max Wittek will get his second start. Wittek completed 14 of 23 throws for 186 yards and one touchdown against Notre Dame in the regular season finale.

Although Wittek is short on experience, he will have the nation’s top receiving corps at his disposal. Unanimous All-American and Biletnikoff Award winner Marqise Lee has 112 catches for 1,680 yards and 14 TDs this season, while Robert Woods added another 73 catches for 813 yards and 11 TDs.

Georgia Tech arrives with the nation’s No. 77 scoring defense (29.9 ppg), No. 67 passing defense and No. 47 run defense, having allowed 3,110 yards and 22 pass TDs along with 1,921 yards and 27 rush TDs in 13 games.

When the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets have the ball:

For all the success Paul Johnson has had with his triple-option offense during the season, the Yellow Jackets have struggled in bowl games when teams have weeks — as opposed to days — to prepare for the unique attack. Johnson’s Jackets are 0–4 in bowls since he took over in 2008, including a 30–27 loss to Utah in last year’s Sun Bowl.

Quarterback Tevin Washington is the engine that powers the Ramblin’ Wreck — with 1,173 yards and seven TDs through the air, and 638 yards and 19 TDs on the ground. Running back Orwin Smith was Tech’s leading rusher and second-leading receiver, but was forced to sit out of the season’s final two games with an ankle injury.

USC’s star-studded secondary, led by safety T.J. McDonald and corner Nickell Robey, will be neutralized somewhat against GT’s ground-and-pound offense. But the Trojans’ strong linebacker corps, including big play Dion Bailey, Hayes Pullard and No. 55 Lamar Dawson will be prominently on display in Monte Kiffin’s last game calling the defense.

Final Analysis

Barkley, McDonald and a loaded senior class won’t go out in the style they envisioned, but they will go out waving the “V” for victory. Expect the Trojans to ride off into the sunset following a decisive Sun Bowl win.

Prediction: USC 42, Georgia Tech 24


Related College Football Content

A Very Early College Football Top 25 for 2013
Music City Bowl Preview and Prediction: NC State vs. Vanderbilt

Liberty Bowl Preview and Prediction: Tulsa vs. Iowa State

Teaser:
<p> Sun Bowl Preview and Prediction: Georgia Tech vs. USC</p>
Post date: Sunday, December 30, 2012 - 08:01
Path: /college-football/pinstripe-bowl-preview-and-prediction-west-virginia-vs-syracuse
Body:

The third annual bowl game at Yankee Stadium may technically be a matchup between the Big 12’s West Virginia Mountaineers and the Big East’s Syracuse Orange. But the reality is that this is a grudge match between former Big East rivals who first played in 1945 and have played every year since 1955.

Since 1993, the winner of the rivalry has been awarded the Floyd “Ben” Schwartzwalder Trophy — a hulking 55-pound award that was sculpted by Syracuse player Jim Ridlon and named after the former West Virginia player and Syracuse head coach. This time around, the George M. Steinbrenner Trophy — named after the late, great seven-time World Series champion New York Yankees owner — will also be on the line.

The Orange lead the all-time series, 32–27, including victories over the Mountaineers in each of their past two meetings following an eight-game win streak by WVU over SU from 2002-09. Last season, Syracuse dominated West Virginia, 49–23, scoring more points in the series than it had since 1960. Two years ago, the Orange went on the road for a 19–14 win in Morgantown.

Pinstripe Bowl — West Virginia (7–5) vs. Syracuse (7–5)

Date and Time: Dec. 29 at 3:15 p.m. ET
Network: ESPN
Location: Bronx, N.Y.

When the West Virginia Mountaineers have the ball:

The short right field porch at Yankee Stadium won’t come into play at this year’s Pinstripe Bowl, but there could be plenty of home runs hit judging by the Mountaineers’ recent history. This season, WVU’s scoring offense ranked No. 7 nationally, averaging 41.6 points per game. And that doesn’t include last year’s bowl, when West Virginia crushed Clemson, 70–33, in a game that broke nine Orange Bowl records.

It’s easy to forget, but WVU quarterback Geno Smith was the clear Heisman Trophy frontrunner following a 5–0 start to the season in which he threw 24 TDs and zero INTs. A five-game slide followed, abruptly ending Smith’s award-worthy campaign. But the senior from Miami still finished the season with 4,004 yards, 40 TDs and six INTs — with the help of prolific receivers Stedman Bailey (106 catches for 1,501 yards, 23 TDs) and Tavon Austin (110 catches for 1,259 yards, 12 TDs).

For all his success, however, Smith has struggled in his two starts against Syracuse, completing a combined 44-of-78 passes for 516 yards, three TDs and five INTs while going 0–2 against the Orange. Smith will also be without center Joe Madsen for the Pinstripe Bowl, as the senior was ruled academically ineligible. 

“With Syracuse, we have some unfinished business,” said WVU coach Dana Holgorsen. “Their scheme got us a little bit. We’ll see how much improvement we made on specific looks. They’re very much a dial-up-a-defense kind of team, so you don’t know what you’re going to get.

“Seventeen of the first 18 blitzes last year were different, so we have to identify that and get in the right play. (Geno Smith) has matured a bunch. And from a scheme standpoint, he is going to be able to see that and make some pretty good checks — I feel comfortable about that.”

When the Syracuse Orange have the ball:

Doug Marrone was Drew Brees’ offensive coordinator with the New Orleans Saints before taking over at Syracuse. While Orange senior signal-caller Ryan Nassib may not be a Super Bowl MVP, he could be a Pinstripe Bowl MVP soon enough. After passing for 3,619 yards, 24 TDs and nine INTs, Nassib will be leaned on to match scoring strikes with WVU’s Smith — who is ranked by many as the top quarterback prospect in April’s 2013 NFL Draft.

“The Pinstripe Bowl is going to be a great game with two high powered offenses going head-to-head,” said Nassib. “It is going to be a lot of fun for me and the other seniors. This is like our Super Bowl.”

West Virginia’s defense allowed 38.1 points per game, ranking No. 114, or seventh-worst, in the country. The Mountaineers allowed 45 or more points in six games and could struggle to slow down Nassib’s favorite receivers Alec Lemon and Marcus Sales, as well as the Orange’s backfield duo of Jerome Smith and Prince-Tyson Gulley.

Final Analysis

Syracuse has a 6–1 record at Yankee Stadium, including a 3–0 win over Pittsburgh in the first college football game played at the old ballpark in 1923. But given a month to gameplan, the coach-QB duo of Holgorsen and Smith could call their shot — maybe not quite like last year’s Ruthian 70-point Orange Bowl effort — at the home of the Bronx Bombers. 

Prediction: West Virginia 45, Syracuse 38


Related College Football Content

College Football's Very Early Top 25 for 2013
Top 10 Freshmen Seasons in College Football History

Teaser:
<p> Pinstripe Bowl Preview and Prediction: West Virginia vs. Syracuse</p>
Post date: Friday, December 28, 2012 - 07:05
Path: /nfl/2012-nfl-picks-every-game-week-17
Body:

NFL Week 17 previews and predictions for every game on the schedule, broken down into tiers in regards to what they’re playing for (in order of likelihood) on the last Sunday of the regular season:


First-round Bye:

Texans (12-3) at Colts (10-5)
Houston can wrap up a first-round bye with a win or a tie; or a New England loss or tie; or a Denver loss. The Texans will earn home-field advantage with a win; or a tie and a Broncos loss or tie; or a Patriots loss or tie as well as a loss by the Broncos. Houston has lost two of its last three games. But the Texans’ lone win during that stretch was a 29–17 victory over the Colts. Indianapolis has already clinched a playoff berth, becoming just the second team in history to win 10 games after losing 14 or more in the previous season.
Texans by 3


Chiefs (2-13) at Broncos (12-3)
Denver will clinch a first-round bye with a win or tie; or a New England loss or tie. The Broncos can claim home-field advantage with a win coupled with a Texans loss or tie; or a tie along with a loss by Houston. The Broncos are 6–1 at Mile High this season, giving Peyton Manning and Co. plenty of motivation to hand the Chiefs their 12th loss in 13 weeks. Denver beat Kansas City 17–9 in Week 12.
Broncos by 15


Packers (11-4) at Vikings (9-6)
There is plenty on the line for both Green Bay and Minnesota in this black-and-blue NFC North division rivalry game. The Packers earn a first-round bye with a win; or a tie and a loss or tie by the 49ers; or a San Francisco loss and a Seattle loss or tie. The Vikings punch their ticket to the playoffs with a win; or a tie and a loss or tie by the Bears; or the trifecta of a Cowboys loss or tie, Giants loss or tie and Bears loss. Green Bay beat Minnesota, 23–14, in Week 13.
Packers by 1


Dolphins (7-8) at Patriots (11-4)
New England clinches a first-round bye with a win coupled with a loss by either Denver or Houston. The Patriots can claim home-field advantage throughout the playoffs with a win, and a loss by both the Broncos and Texans. The Pats have made the Super Bowl in five of the six playoffs that Tom Brady and Bill Belichick have entered as a No. 1 or 2 seed.
Patriots by 13


Cardinals (5-10) at 49ers (10-4-1)
San Francisco will be NFC West champions with a win or tie. The Niners can earn a first-round bye with a win or tie and a Packers loss or tie. San Fran beat Arizona, 24–3, in Week 8.
49ers by 14


Rams (7-7-1) at Seahawks (10-5)
Seattle will be NFC West champions with a win coupled with a loss by San Francisco. The Hawks can clinch home-field advantage — where they are an undefeated 7–0 — with a win and a loss by both the 49ers and Packers.
Seahawks by 9


Playoff Berth:

Cowboys (8-7) at Redskins (9-6)
The flex-schedule Sunday night prime time game features a classic rivalry as well as a do-or-die playoff play-in showdown between two teams that control their own destiny.
Redskins by 1


Bears (9-6) at Lions (4-11)
After losing five of its last seven contests, Chicago must win and hope for a Minnesota loss or tie in order to sneak into the playoffs.
Bears by 2


Eagles (4-11) at Giants (8-7)
The defending Super Bowl champs need the dominoes to fall — with a win and losses by the Cowboys, Bears and Vikings.
Giants by 5


Playoff Health:

Buccaneers (6-9) at Falcons (13-2)
Atlanta has wrapped up the No. 1 seed in the NFC Playoffs as well as the NFC South crown.
Falcons by 9


Ravens (10-5) at Bengals (9-6)
Baltimore is the AFC North champ, while the Bengals have already clinched a playoff berth.
Bengals by 3


Next Year:

Panthers (6-9) at Saints (7-8)
Believe New Orleans wants revenge for its 35–27 loss at Carolina in Week 2.
Saints by 6


Browns (5-10) at Steelers (7-8)
Big Ben hopes to do what Charlie Batch didn’t during a 20–14 loss at Cleveland in Week 12.
Steelers by 9


Jets (6-9) at Bills (5-10)
New York soared to a 48–28 win over Buffalo in Week 1. That sure seems like a long time ago.
Bills by 3


Raiders (4-11) at Chargers (6-9)
The supposed final game of the Norv Turner era is a rematch of a 22–14 Bolts win in Week 1.
Chargers by 8


Jaguars (2-13) at Titans (5-10)
Tennessee handed Jacksonville its only home win of the year with a 24–19 loss in Week 12.
Titans by 4


Last week: 10–6 // Season: 160–80
 

Teaser:
<p> 2012 NFL Picks, Every Game: Week 17, including the Dallas Cowboys at Washington Redskins, Houston Texans at Indianapolis Colts, Green Bay Packers at Minnesota Vikings, Baltimore Ravens at Cincinnati Bengals, Chicago Bears at Detroit Lions, Philadelphia Eagles at New York Giants, Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Atlanta Falcons, New York Jets at Buffalo Bills, Carolina Panthers at New Orleans Saints and Miami Dolphins at New England Patriots.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 20:24
Path: /nfl/nfl-power-rankings-going-week-17
Body:

Athlon Sports' weekly rankings of NFL teams. The Atlanta Falcons have flown back into the top spot after locking up home-field advantage throughout the NFC Playoffs. Meanwhile, the Kansas City Chiefs remain the on the bottom of the totem pole.

Here are our NFL Power Rankings following Week 16 of the season:



1. Falcons (13-2) Earn home-field advantage throughout NFC playoffs.

2. Seahawks (10-5) Russell Wilson throws four TDs to defeat 49ers.

3. 49ers (10-4-1) Letdown loss at Seattle after win at New England.

4. Patriots (11-4) Rally from 10–0 deficit for comeback win at Jags.

5. Packers (11-4) Score 50 or more points for first time since 2005.

6. Texans (12-3) Held out of the end zone for first time since 2006.

7. Broncos (12-3) Riding 10-game win streak after beating Browns.

8. Ravens (10-5) Ray Lewis activated on 53-man roster for Week 17.

9. Colts (10-5) Fourth-quarter comeback clinches berth in playoffs.

10. Bengals (9-6) Josh Brown game-winner comes with four ticks left.

11. Redskins (9-6) Aiming for first NFC East division title since 1999.

12. Cowboys (8-7) It’s win or go home after loss to New Orleans in OT.

13. Vikings (9-6) Adrian Peterson needs 102 yards to reach 2,000.

14. Bears (9-6) Defense scores two more TDs in victory at Arizona.

15. Giants (8-7) Outscored 67–14 in losses at Atlanta, at Baltimore.



16. Steelers (7-8) Miss playoffs for just second time in Mike Tomlin era.

17. Rams (7-7-1) Jackson nearing eighth straight 1,000-yard season.

18. Saints (7-8) Playoff hopes ended by Vikings’ victory over Texans.

19. Dolphins (7-8) Reggie Bush scores three TDs in win over Buffalo.

20. Panthers (6-9) Cam Newton apologizes for bumping game official.

21. Buccaneers (6-9) Lose five turnovers, turnover on downs twice in loss.

22. Chargers (6-9) Antonio Gates passes Lance Alworth with 82nd TD.

23. Jets (6-9) Greg McElroy sacked 11 times in loss to San Diego.

24. Titans (5-10) Held scoreless until 1:39 remaining in 48-point loss.

25. Bills (5-10) Have missed playoffs for 13 consecutive seasons.

26. Browns (5-10) Richardson tops Jim Brown rookie rushing record.

27. Cardinals (5-10) Throw four pick-sixes, zero TDs in last four games.

28. Lions (4-11) Megatron can’t transform records into better record.

29. Eagles (4-11) Mike Vick doesn’t see Week 17 start as “audition.”

30. Raiders (4-11) Palmer, Leinart, Pryor all see action at QB in defeat.

31. Jaguars (2-13) Break inaugural 1995 season record for most losses.

32. Chiefs (2-13) Jamaal Charles’ 226 rushing yards still not enough.
 

Teaser:
<p> NFL Power Rankings Going Into Week 17, including the San Francisco 49ers, Atlanta Falcons, New England Patriots, Houston Texans, Denver Broncos, Green Bay Packers, Seattle Seahawks, Baltimore Ravens, Indianapolis Colts, Washington Redskins, New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys, Minnesota Vikings, Chicago Bears, Pittsburgh Steelers, Cincinnati Bengals and St. Louis Rams.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 20:07
All taxonomy terms: USC Trojans, NFL, NBA, MLB
Path: /nfl/10-worst-sports-moments-2012
Body:

The year in sports was full of both highlights and lowlights. There were great moments like Usain Bolt’s 100-meter dash at the London Olympics and LeBron James winning his first NBA championship. But there were even more blunders made on and off the field by players, coaches and entire leagues. Here’s a look at the bottom 10 worst sports moments of 2012:


1. Golden Tate’s replacement referee TD
The Replacement Refs went out with a bang, making a controversial call of simultaneous possession on a game-winning touchdown “catch” by the Seahawks’ Golden Tate to beat the Packers in prime time on Monday Night Football.

After watching the scab refs throw yellow flags, hand out fourth timeouts, put more or less than the right amount of time on the clock, spot the ball on the wrong yard-line, call college football rules in an NFL game or create an environment of casual chaos on Thursdays, Sundays and Mondays from Weeks 1-through-3 this season, Commissioner Roger Goodell and the NFL owners finally decided enough was enough after one of the wildest finishes in NFL history.


2. Lance Armstrong’s doping scandal
“There comes a point in every man’s life when he has to say, ‘Enough is enough,’” Armstrong said in a statement declaring he would not continue his fight against the United States Anti-Doping Agency. “For me, that time is now.” And with that, Armstrong’s reputation was wiped out mere mortal cyclists on the Pyrenees or Alps, his seven Tour de France titles were stripped and the signature Livestrong yellow wristbands became fodder for South Park jokes. The cancer survivor was cast away into the asterisk purgatory of Barry Bonds, as the greatest cheater his sport has ever seen.


3. Bobby Petrino’s motorcycle wreck
The ultimate April Fool, the 51-year-old married father of four wiped out on his motorcycle with 25-year-old Jessica Dorrell, a blonde former Arkansas volleyball player turned football program employee. When the neck brace was off, it turned out that the young Dorrell had accepted some $20,000 in gifts used for a car, vacation and wedding expenses — that’s right, she was engaged to be married.

Petrino lost his job, but not before making himself into a national punch-line and reminding everyone not to use a company phone (especially if working for a state school) when trying to keep an inter-office affair hidden from your wife and boss.


4. National Hockey League lockout
The NHL owners declared a lockout of the NHL Players’ Association, canceling the scheduled Oct. 11, 2012 start of the season. The Commissioner Gary Bettman-led NHL owners want to reduce the NHLPA’s previous guaranteed share of 57 percent of hockey related revenues. The league canceled NBC’s Thanksgiving Showdown on Black Friday as well as the 2013 NHL Winter Classic, and seems set on turning the “Big Four” team sports into the “Big Three.”


5. Mark Sanchez’s “butt fumble” season
While Tim Tebow sat on the bench and watched from the sideline, the Jets’ face of the franchise formerly known as New York’s “Sanchize” quarterback was “butt-fumbling” on the field. Sanchez threw 13 TDs and 17 INTs for a 67.9 quarterback rating, while also coughing up the football with 12 fumbles, seven of which were recovered by the opposing defense — none more memorable than the one during a 49–19 loss to division rival New England in an instant classic Thanksgiving Day play.


 

6. Alex Rodriguez’s playoff performance
The world’s most overpaid athlete hit .120 (3-for-25) with two walks and one run scored over seven games in the playoffs. Plus, A-Rod produced the ultimate A-Rod moment when he allegedly attempted to get the phone number of Australian model Kyna Treacy by sending a souvenir baseball to her in the stands during Game 1 of the ALCS. A-Rod shut down his flirting bar fly from the bench routine when the Captain, Derek Jeter, broke his ankle hustling for the team in extra innings.


7. Miami Marlins’ fire sale trade(s)
After spending over $500 million in public money from taxpayers and the city of Miami in order to build Marlins Park, notoriously bad owner Jeffrey Loria pulled a classic bait and switch — trading away nearly every player on the roster worthy of having his own baseball card. Is a ball club better with or without Hanley Ramirez, Jose Reyes, Josh Johnson, Anibal Sanchez, Mark Buehrle, Omar Infante, John Buck, Emilio Bonifacio, Heath Bell, Randy Choate, Edward Mujica and Gaby Sanchez? Doesn’t take a Sabermetrics statistician to answer that one.


8. Amare Stoudemire’s fire extinguisher fight
The Knicks’ big man punched through the glass box of a fire extinguisher following a 104–94 loss to the Heat in Game 3 of the first round of the Eastern Conference Playoffs. Massive bleeding and near nerve damage ensued. Following a handful of stitches, Stoudemire tweeted out a gruesome picture of the hand. Luckily, Stoudemire’s hand has healed (and prompted an Office Space-inspired GIF); it is his bad back that has kept him out of the lineup this year despite a contract with three years left and over $60 million still owed.


 

9. U.S. Ryder Cup team’s choke job
In an epic meltdown that Greg Norman, Jean Van de Velde, or any member of the 1999 European Ryder Cup team could relate to all too well, the 2012 U.S. Ryder Cup team folded like a Medinah spectator’s golf chair at the 38th Ryder Cup. On the comfortable confines of U.S. soil and in front of 40,000 rowdy American fans, Team USA led 10–6 on Sunday — needing just 4.5 points out of 12 singles matches. But the lineup assembled by Captain David Love III hacked their way to one of the worst letdown losses in the 85-year history of the international competition.


10. USC Trojans’ fall from No. 1 to unranked
Lane Kiffin’s club was ranked preseason No. 1 and had a storybook season ready for a Hollywood ending. Senior quarterback Matt Barkley returned to lead the Trojans out of the darkness of NCAA-imposed sanctions and into the BCS spotlight. Five losses later, USC is getting ready for the Sun Bowl rather than the national title game in Miami, the city where Reggie Bush, the man responsible for the punishment in the first place, is now allowed to play for pay. Adding insult to injury — or injury to insult as it were — Barkley suffered a right shoulder injury and is hoping to prove himself healthy in the El Paso bowl.

Teaser:
<p> The 10 Worst Sports Moments of 2012, including the NFL replacement referees call of Golden Tate's TD, Lance Armstrong's doping scandal, Bobby Petrino's motorcycle wreck, the NHL lockout, Mark Sanchez's butt fumble, Alex Rodriguez's playoff performance, the Miami Marlins' fire sale, Amare Stoudemire's fire extinguisher punch, the U.S. Ryder Cup team's choke job and the USC Trojans' fall from preseason No. 1 to unranked.</p>
Post date: Wednesday, December 26, 2012 - 18:30

Pages