10 Players Most Likely to Make Baseball's 500,000th Error

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Here are our best guesses

<p> Here are our best guesses</p>

According to the greatest baseball research website in the world, Baseball-Reference.com, MLB and its players are approaching the 500,000th recorded error since 1876. Wow, a half-million miscues.

With 499,982 as of today, Sept. 15, some unfortunate dude will make the milestone mess-up most likely on Sunday, Sept. 16 (or the next day).


Here are our Top 10 candidates to make history:

10. Wilin Rosario, C, Rockies
Rosario is developing the reputation as one of the best throwers in the game behind the plate, and he is second in the majors with 69 assists, despite playing in only 82 games. He also leads all catchers in errors with 11.
How it could happen: After Chase Headley beats the throw to the plate on a single by Yasmani Grandal, Rosario steps up to take the throw and tries to get Grandal advancing to second, but his throw sails wide and into center field, which allows the Padres’ catcher to advance to third.


9. Alex Gordon, LF, Royals
Outfielders aren’t charged with errors often, so Gordon isn’t the odds-on favorite. But he’s in love with his arm and seems to enjoy showing it off, which probably has something to do with teammate Jeff Francoeur in right field regularly gunning down runners.
How it could happen: Maicer Izturis of the Angels foolishly attempts to go from first to third on an Albert Pujols single to left center and Gordon throws a pea to third baseman Mike Moustakas. But even the best of throws can hit runners and ricochet awry, leaving the outfielder with the throwing error. Izturis scores as the ball trickles toward the Angels’ dugout.



8. Elvis Andrus, SS, Rangers
I like Andrus’ defense, but he covers ground, and by definition, shortstops tend to make errors.
How it could happen: In an 8-1 Rangers blowout over Seattle in the Texas heat, Andrus ranges to his left, but can’t corral a grounder by the Mariners’ Trayvon Robinson.


7. Daniel Descalso, SS, Cardinals
With shortstop Rafael Furcal out for the season with an elbow injury, Descalso has become the everyday player at the position. It’s not that he’s sub-par, he’s just not accustomed to playing nine innings at the demanding position every day.
How it could happen: The Dodgers’ Matt Kemp hits a sharp ground ball that handcuffs Descalso with no one on in the sixth inning.


6. Hanley Ramirez, SS, Dodgers
Ramirez topped 20 errors in his first three seasons for the Marlins. He’s steadily improved, and he’s made just two in 32 games at short for the Dodgers this season. But it could happen. Besides, shortstop is demanding and having Vin Scully’s immediate impression is always a bonus.
How it could happen: With runners on first and third, the Cardinals’ David Freese rolls over one and hits a ready-made double-play grounder to short, which should get the Dodgers and Chris Capuano out of the fifth inning with no runs. Ramirez boots it, a run scores and the inning continues.


5. Asdrubal Cabrera, SS, Indians
It’s been a long season in Cleveland. It’s tough to maintain concentration this late in a disappointing and frustrating year. If the milestone lasts through the weekend, the Twins will be in Cleveland. And who can concentrate on a Tuesday night during a Twins-Indians game?
How it could happen: Josh Willingham’s harmless grounder eats up Cabrera.


4. Ian Desmond, SS, Nationals
Desmond has the worst fielding percentage of qualifying NL shortstops. And we know he’ll be in the lineup every day since the Nationals are in the pennant race.
How it could happen: Michael Bourn of Atlanta hits a chopper to short that Desmond rushes and throws in the dirt, eluding first baseman Adam LaRoche, allowing Bourn to sprint to second.



3. Starlin Castro, SS, Cubs
Castro is certainly no stranger to errors or mental lapses. And the Cubs will be hosting the Pirates and Reds during this stretch, two teams that love to put pressure on defenses.
How it could happen: After making an error earlier in the game, Castro makes a nice stop in the hole on a Michael McKendry ground ball, but nonchalants the throw and pulls first baseman Anthony Rizzo off the bag.



2. Pedro Alvarez, 3B, Pirates
The slugger has found his swing this season and is providing the Bucs with badly needed pop in the lineup. He takes pride in his defense but tries to make plays at times when he shouldn’t, which is why he leads the majors in errors this season.
How it could happen: David DeJesus chops one down the third base line and Alvarez charges hard, bare hands and makes a wide throw to first. Scoring: Infield hit and error.



1. Ryan Zimmerman, 3B, Nationals
Zimmerman, who owns a Gold Glove and has developed a reputation as a superb fielder, has recently become the latest victim of the throwing yips. He has 10 throwing errors this season.
How it could happen: Chipper Jones hits a routine grounder to third, Zimmerman fields, sets himself, and yip, throws it in the seats. Yep. That’s No. 500,000.


The 1,000-Error Club
They just don’t make errors the way they used to. All four in this illustrious club retired before 1915. Pee Wee Reese, who retired at the end of 1958, was the last player to make more than 400 errors, less than half required for this special club membership.

There are just four players in the 1,000-error club. Herman Long leads the pack with 1,096 errors. Bill Dahlen has 1,080, Deacon White made 1,018 and Germany Smith crept into the club with 1,009.

Herman Long, nicknamed “Germany” and the “Flying Dutchman,” played shortstop primarily for 16 seasons with the Boston Beaneaters. His rookie season in 1889 was spent with the Kansas City Cowboys, for which he made 122 errors in 128 games. He topped 100 boots in two other seasons.

Bad Bill Dahlen was a contemporary of Long’s. He was also a shortstop who was charged with 86 errors with the Chicago Colts in 1895.

Deacon White retired in 1890 after 20 seasons of making errors. In the mid-1870s he put together four miraculous seasons of 51, 56, 60 and 64 errors from his catcher position for the Boston Red Stockings. He finished his career with 444 errors at the hot corner and 399 from behind the plate.

Germany Smith — born in Pittsburgh — was a shortstop who spent 15 seasons in the big leagues before retiring in 1898. He wound up his career with 907 runs and 1,009 errors.

-Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

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