Sun Belt


#118 Troy Trojans





HEAD COACH: Neal Brown, First Season | OFF. COORDINATOR: Kenny Edenfield, Matt Moore | DEF. COORDINATOR: Vic Koenning

For the first time since 1990, someone other than Larry Blakeney will coach Troy. Blakeney’s tenure, which coincided with the Trojans’ move to major college football, included five Sun Belt titles and five bowl games. He’ll be tough to replace, but Troy turns to a familiar face to replace Blakeney and — the Trojans hope — revitalize the program. 

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Previewing Troy’s Offense for 2015 

Old habits die hard, so it will come as little surprise that first-year Troy coach Neal Brown, a former offensive coordinator for the Trojans before moving on to the same job at Texas Tech and Kentucky, plans to continue calling plays in his new role. The offense will have his stamp on it, which means an emphasis on a faster pace of play and less rotation of players.

Brown’s task won’t be easy. While there are several starters returning, there are also holes that must be filled and, more important, consistency that must be established. The Trojans were 10th in the Sun Belt in both scoring offense and total offense last year.

Brown appears to have his quarterback in place, which is a nice start. Brandon Silvers set the NCAA record for pass completion percentage (70.5) by a freshman, but he was up and down. One positive: He threw only three interceptions in 271 attempts. Dallas Tidwell and perhaps incoming freshman Gardner Minshew will try to impress the new staff in the fall, but the job appears to be Silvers’ to lose.

Running back is perhaps the deepest position on the offense, though Brandon Burks and Jordan Chunn combined to barely top 1,000 yards rushing in 2014. Josh Anderson, a 260-pound fullback, should have an impact. 

Bryan Holmes, K.D. Edenfield and Teddy Ruben return to the receiving corps, and if Brown has his way, the group should be far more productive this fall. 

The offensive line will be led by Antonio Garcia and Dalton Bennett, but improvement is needed there as well. This group will have to adjust to the faster pace of play that Brown intends to implement.

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Previewing Troy’s Defense for 2015

In effect, the Trojans’ defense is being rebuilt from scratch. Brown hired Vic Koenning as defensive coordinator, a position he held at the school from 2003-04. The Trojans ranked near the bottom of the league in most key defensive categories in 2014, and they gave up at least 40 points five times in 12 games. 

Koenning will technically run a 4-2-5 alignment but will often switch the alignments in an effort to catch the opponent off guard. The aim is to use a swarming attack that takes advantage of speed and quickness off the edge. 

Up front, Troy has Tyler Roberts and former Arkansas Razorback Lonnie Gosha leading the way, with some expected added talent also set to contribute. At linebacker, junior college signees William Lloyd and Justin Lucas are expected to step in and play big roles right away. In the secondary, newcomers Jalen Rountree and LaMarcus Farmer should add experience and talent. Troy ranked a respectable fifth in the Sun Belt in passing defense last season.

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing Troy’s Specialists for 2015 

The placekicking duties are wide open, and the competition will continue right up until the start of the season. Ryan Kay will return as the team’s punter. The Trojans were average at best in the return game last season.

Final Analysis 

In many ways, this is a complete rebuild for Brown and his coaching staff. The once-proud Troy program had fallen on hard times in recent years; the Trojans have missed a bowl in four straight seasons after playing in the postseason four times from 2006-10.

A bowl game isn’t likely this fall, either. The Trojans have a difficult non-conference schedule that includes trips to NC State, Wisconsin and Mississippi State, and they play Sun Belt heavyweights Appalachian State and UL-Lafayette on the road.

Anything close to six wins should be considered a big success in Year 1 of the Brown era. 


#125 Idaho Vandals





HEAD COACH: Paul Petrino, 2-21 (2 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Kris Cinkovich | DEF. COORDINATOR: Mike Breske

Idaho finished 2014 with its third consecutive one-win season, but, believe it or not, the Vandals made progress. Idaho was outscored by only 135 points in 2014. That sounds bad, but consider that the Vandals were outscored by 343 points in 2013 and 319 in 2011. For a team that’s lost 42 games in four seasons, any sign of real progress is notable.

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Previewing Idaho’s Offense for 2015

Coach Paul Petrino welcomes back the top rusher and passer from an offense that averaged 25 points and 417.5 yards per game, and the third-year coach is expecting even better numbers this season.

Quarterback Matt Linehan had his ups and downs during his redshirt freshman season when he started all 11 games and completed 58.3 percent of his passes for 2,540 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also threw 18 interceptions, a number that will need to dwindle if the Vandals are to show the improvement Petrino predicts.

The return of wide receiver Dezmon Epps should help the passing game. Epps was Idaho’s leading receiver in 2013 when he caught 79 passes for 980 yards and four touchdowns. He was kicked off the team last summer for an off-the-field incident and didn’t play last season. The senior received a second chance from Petrino for staying in good academic standing. Between Epps and junior tight end Deon Watson (37 catches in 2014), Linehan has two athletic playmakers at his disposal.

Senior running back Elijhaa Penny led Idaho with 589 yards and 12 touchdowns, and the 6'2", 254-pound bruiser is expected to spearhead the ground game again. Sophomore Aaron Duckworth is the speedier, change-of-pace back.

The biggest question comes up front. Petrino must replace four-year starter Mike Marboe at center and rebuild a unit that yielded 41 sacks. Junior Steven Matlock assumes the center spot and will anchor a young unit that has only one senior starter — guard Dallas Sandberg. If the O-line jells and can protect Linehan, Idaho’s offense should improve.

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Previewing Idaho's Defense for 2015

After being one of the worst FBS defenses last year, the Vandals are changing to a 3-4 scheme designed to get more speed on the field. Idaho allowed 462.7 yards and 37.3 points per game, prompting Petrino to bring in five defensive backs in the offseason to help fortify the pass defense.

Senior cornerback Jayshawn Jordan (62 tackles) and junior safety Russell Siavii (52 tackles) are the top defensive backs returning, but competition will be fierce in the back end.

End Quinton Bradley (six sacks) and tackle Ryan Edwards (19 tackles) are the best up front. Linebacker Marc Millan led the team with 102 tackles last season, and several other contributors are back at that spot, but Petrino is very high on grayshirt Kaden Elliss, the son of former NFL Pro Bowler Luther Elliss.

Bottom line: For this unit to improve, it will have to generate more than the 18 sacks and 17 takeaways it did last season.

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing Idaho’s Specialists for 2015 

The kicking game is solid with junior Austin Rehkow, who handles the placekicking and punting duties. Rehkow is accurate from inside 40 yards but inconsistent from long range. As a punter, he’s averaged better than 47 yards on 119 career punts. The return of Epps solidifies the return teams, which haven’t produced a touchdown of any kind since 2012.

Final Analysis

Perhaps the best news since the end of last season was the NCAA lifting a bowl ban and sanctions limiting practice time because of poor APR scores. The Vandals need every bit of practice to try to become competitive and put together their first winning season since 2009.

The offense should be improved now that Linehan has a year under his belt and some proven playmakers. The real key for Idaho will be on defense. In Idaho’s 10 losses last season, it gave up 34 or more points. If the Vandals can slow down the opposition and give their offense a chance, this team can make a move in the Sun Belt.


#115 ULM Warhawks





HEAD COACH: Todd Berry, 27-34 (5 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Todd Berry | DEF. COORDINATOR: Travis Niekamp, Adam Waugh

Todd Berry and the Warhawks have eight starters back on a veteran defense and five starters back on a questionable offense. The team should be more balanced in 2015 and with 13 games (including Hawaii), ULM could find itself in the postseason. Contending for a Sun Belt title, however, may be a much taller order.

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Previewing ULM's Offense for 2015  

ULM will try to reboot its offense with head coach Todd Berry taking over play-calling duties after a lopsided performance in 2014: The Warhawks led the Sun Belt in passing but ranked dead last in rushing, total offense and scoring.

Stability at quarterback is needed. Senior Brayle Brown has some experience (29 games, two starts) and a deep understanding of the scheme, but he is also injury-prone. Redshirt freshman Garrett Smith is rougher around the edges for now, but he touts an upside as a dual-threat quarterback.

Don’t be surprised if the competition stretches into the season, but the starter will be able to lean heavily on wideouts Rashon Ceaser and Ajalen Holley, the most productive returning receiver duo in the conference (134 receptions, 1,735 yards in 2014).

Sophomore Kaylon Watson and senior DeVontae McNeal, who missed last season with an injury, will share time at running back. It’s an inexperienced pair with only 57 career rushing attempts combined. Neither the ground game nor the new quarterback will be effective if ULM doesn’t answer lingering questions on the offensive line.

“We didn’t play well up front last year, just static and not productive, and we still have some challenges there,” Berry says. “So that quarterback has to have the ability of doing some special things and handle the tempo to help our offensive line.”

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Previewing ULM’s Defense for 2015 

Six of ULM’s top seven tacklers from last season return to a unit that should come of age in 2015. And there are no discernible weak spots.

Nose tackle Gerrand Johnson, the first defensive lineman to lead ULM in tackles since 1980, will man the interior of the front. At linebacker, Hunter Kissinger was a first-team all-league performer last season, and Michael Johnson is the Sun Belt’s returning sack leader. Mitch Lane, another first-team All-Sun Belt selection, leads the secondary at the Hawk position of ULM’s 3-3-5 scheme.

“This is a senior-laden group that’s been in a lot of ball games,” Berry says. “Our linebacking corps is as good as any I’ve been around in a long time.”

The defense more than doubled its sack total over the last two seasons, and expect another increase in pressure with an athletic, experienced group coming back.


Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing ULM's Specialists for 2015  

The graduation of Justin Manton, an all-conference kicker and punter, leaves a large vacancy. Redshirt freshman Craig Ford will take over placekicking duties, while true freshman Chris Qualls will battle Ford at punter. Ceaser’s 9.5-yard average on punt returns would have led the Sun Belt had he had enough attempts to qualify. Speedster Tyler Cain is also back to return kicks.

Final Analysis

An NCAA scheduling exemption allows ULM to play a 13-game schedule because it involves a trip to Hawaii. That could increase the Warhawks’ bowl possibilities, but only if the veteran group weathers non-conference contests at Georgia and Alabama and 10 straight games without a bye week.

ULM has only five home games, but Berry’s teams have overcome the school’s scheduling challenges before with 6–6 and 8–5 seasons during the past three years. The Warhawks’ final five losses last season were each by seven points or fewer, and the same slim margin should be there again.

Expect ULM’s defense to be among the Sun Belt’s best, but the team will go only as far as the offense and a new starting quarterback can take it. Berry is an imaginative offensive coach with a knack for getting the best out of his quarterbacks, and his expertise will be tested in 2015.


#108 South Alabama Jaguars





HEAD COACH: Joey Jones, 37-28 (6 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Bryant Vincent | DEF. COORDINATOR: Travis Pearson

Joey Jones has done excellent work at South Alabama. The transition to the highest level of college football has been pretty smooth, considering the Jaguars have already reached a bowl game. However, a bizarre injection of game-ready players from defunct UAB could make summer camp interesting in Mobile.

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Previewing South Alabama’s Offense for 2015  

To help restock an offense that returns only three starters, South Alabama snatched up instantly eligible UAB players after that program disbanded. And as a bonus, UAB offensive coordinator Bryant Vincent, a former USA quarterbacks coach, followed some of his players to Mobile to call plays for the Jaguars.

Quarterback Cody Clements, slot receiver D.J. Vinson and guard Cameron Blankenship, all UAB transfers, should start immediately. Clements, who sat out spring practice due to an injury, passed for 2,227 yards and 14 TDs last season. Vinson, an all-purpose threat, rushed for 670 yards at running back at UAB, but his services are needed more as a receiver at USA.

Blankenship is already among USA’s top linemen, and more UAB transfers could contribute or even start.

“Not only are they good players, but they have been in the system we’re running because of (Vincent) coming here,” USA coach Joey Jones says. “The learning curve is good for them, and they could be a good plus for our offense.”

Running back should be strong, as the returning duo of Terrance Timmons (403 yards) and Xavier Johnson (438 yards) is supplemented by junior college All-American Tyreis Thomas.

Right tackle Chris May is a returning anchor on the offensive line, but there are otherwise experience and depth concerns up front. Similarly, the wide receiving corps must develop role players into standouts.

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Previewing South Alabama’s Defense for 2015 

USA’s defense returns only two starters in safeties Roman Buchanan (74 tackles) and Antonio Carter (54 tackles). And six USA defensive players who earned some type of All-Sun Belt honors last season have graduated.

The secondary could be solid, but only if two cornerbacks and a nickel spot can be solidified. E.J. May should fill one of the cornerback roles well, but freshmen and junior college transfers will take turns trying to fill the rest. Texas Tech transfer Blake Dees and UAB transfer Kalen Jackson may be the best options at linebacker. Both have talent.

Defensive end Jimmie Gipson returns as a proven edge rusher after recording 6.5 tackles for a loss and a team-high seven QB hurries last season. But questions are stacked high up front, especially in the interior line, where Tre Alford and Caleb Butler, both backups as freshmen, enter the season as the best options amid an inexperienced group.

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing South Alabama’s Specialists for 2015  

Placekicker Aleem Sunanon and punter Brandon McKee are both back, providing a little relief for a roster with plenty of unknowns. Sunanon is the Sun Belt’s most accurate returning placekicker, making 15-of-18 field goals last season. Filling the kick returner and punt returner roles may be trial and error early on.

Final Analysis

The young USA program broke through last season with its first bowl appearance, but its evolution takes a curious turn with the instant influx of UAB transfers. Quick fixes will impact what would have otherwise been a rebuilding year. But Jones knows talent alone will not win games. “This will be a different year than we’ve had. We’ve lost 55 players (to graduation) over the last two years,” Jones says. “Some of our veteran guys are not here anymore. We probably have more talent now. But with so many new guys, we have to mold this thing together pretty quickly.”

Three straight September non-conference games — against Nebraska, San Diego State and NC State — could challenge a team lacking chemistry. Eight straight Sun Belt games follow to finish the year. If the Jaguars have any chance at snagging another bowl bid, they’ll have to make some noise in the league race again.

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#93 Texas State Bobcats





HEAD COACH: Dennis Franchione, 36-34 (6 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Jeff Conway, Mike Schultz | DEF. COORDINATOR: John Thompson

Despite picking up seven wins, Texas State did not receive a bowl invite last season. The Bobcats could be in the same position in 2015, as Dennis Franchione welcomes back 12 starters, including his key playmakers on offense. If the offense can carry the team early and the defense finds it footing, Texas State could force its way into the bowl conversation this season.

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Previewing Texas State’s Offense for 2015

A year removed from one of the biggest changes Texas State head coach Dennis Franchione has made during his second stint in San Marcos, the Bobcats are in a much better position on offense. Texas State’s switch to an up-tempo attack last season paid dividends for the Bobcats, who improved in most statistical categories. Texas State averaged 77 plays per game last season (up from 64 in 2013), racked up 33.8 points per game (23.9 in 2013) and amassed 464.3 yards of total offense per game (326.3 in 2013). “The balance we had was great,” Franchione says. “I felt like the plan we devised in the offseason was a good one. The numbers seem to bear that out.”

With junior quarterback Tyler Jones and senior tailback Robert Lowe back in the fold, Texas State could be poised to take another leap on offense. What could hold the Bobcats back this season, however, are some unknowns, especially at wide receiver.

Senior slot receiver C.J. Best turned in a breakthrough campaign last season, but Texas State needs more from wideouts Brandon Smith, Demun Mercer and Jafus Gaines to become an elite offense in the Sun Belt. 

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing Texas State’s Defense for 2015

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The Bobcats experienced just as much upheaval — if not more — on this side of the ball last season as John Thompson brought a new scheme to Franchione’s team. While this season will mark Year 2 under Thompson, Texas State experienced plenty of turnover in the offseason: Thompson lost his four best defenders, including linebacker David Mayo, who was named the Sun Belt’s Defensive Player of the Year.

If the Bobcats are going to find a groove, it will likely come down to the front seven. Texas State has targeted its defensive line as an area it must strengthen to compete against the likes of Arkansas State, Georgia Southern and UL Lafayette. With that in mind, the Bobcats will look for the emergence of sophomore Jeff Banks and junior Roosevelt Pearson as edge rushers and senior Mershad Dillon as a run stopper in the middle.

Even so, Texas State could be in line for an uphill battle on defense, especially early in the season, as Thompson tries to find the right mix of players. The Bobcats have to find someone to replace Mayo, which figures to be a difficult task when you consider that the linebacker had a monster season despite not having a consistent running mate alongside him to provide support. 

Previewing Texas State’s Specialists for 2015

A stellar campaign from kicker/punter Will Johnson notwithstanding, special teams were a mess for Texas State last season. And with Johnson out of the mix (he exhausted his eligibility), the Bobcats will head into this season with a bevy of unanswered questions when it comes to special teams. Texas State inked James Sherman before last season and added Lumi Kaba in its most recent recruiting class. At the moment, it appears that Sherman will take over punting duties, while Kaba will be the Bobcats’ placekicker. Look for this unit to be a work in progress. 

Final Analysis 

Texas State has been knocking on the door for a bowl game during the past two seasons. In fact, the Bobcats were the only 7–5 bowl-eligible team not to receive a postseason invite last season. To secure its first bowl berth in program history, Texas State will likely ask its offense to carry the torch early in the hope that its defense will flourish toward the end of the season. The Bobcats have a favorable home schedule but must face league powers Arkansas State, Georgia Southern and UL Lafayette on the road. If Texas State can sweep its home slate and steal one or two games on the road, Franchione’s team should finally bust down the bowl door.


#90 Appalachian State Mountaineers





HEAD COACH: Scott Satterfield, 11-13 (2 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Dwayne Ledford, Frank Ponce | DEF. COORDINATOR: Nate Woody

Coming off of a seven-win season, Appalachian State is now finally eligible to enjoy the full benefits of being a FBS member. That could mean a bowl bid and possible Sun Belt championship for the Mountaineers, as Scott Satterfield's team returns 10 starters on each side of the ball. Plenty of experience and a favorable home schedule should produce six wins, if not more, in 2015.

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Previewing Appalachian State’s Offense for 2015

Six games into last season, Appalachian State had one win and loads of excuses. The Mountaineers were in their first season on the FBS level, and with freshmen or sophomores filling 14 of the 22 spots in the starting lineup, there was youth everywhere. If the season had gone off the rails, it would have been easy to pinpoint why. But it didn’t. Appalachian State closed the year winning six straight, thanks in large part to an offensive renaissance built around a sturdy running game. In the final six games, the Mountaineers’ rushing average jumped by 99 yards per game.

Four of the five offensive linemen who powered that improvement return, led by senior center Jesse Chapman. The guards are Parker Collins and Colby Gossett, and right tackle Beau Nunn is also back. Davante Harris, who started the first five games a year ago, is penciled in at left tackle.

After rushing for 1,415 yards and earning a spot on the All-Sun Belt second team, running back Marcus Cox is back as well. According to coach Scott Satterfield, the junior won’t have to shoulder as much of the load, as sophomore Terrence Upshaw and freshmen Jalin Moore and Josh Boyd are ready to contribute.

Sophomore quarterback Taylor Lamb, son of longtime Furman coach and current Mercer head man Bobby Lamb, will continue to pilot the offense after breaking the freshman passing record held by Mountaineers great Armanti Edwards. His top four receiving targets from last season are all back, meaning the offense that blossomed late last season should be able to keep its momentum going.

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing Appalachian State’s Defense for 2015

Order a copy of Athlon's 2015 National College Football Preview, which includes an in-depth look at all 128 teams, features and predictions for the upcoming season.

With 10 starters back, Appalachian State’s defense should be up for whatever the Sun Belt throws at it.

Satterfield expects senior defensive end Ronald Blair — who racked up six sacks as a junior — to be the next Mountaineer to reach the NFL. The three-year starter leads a defensive front that’s long on experience.

Junior linebacker John Law led the team in tackles last season. He’ll be surrounded by proven talents such as inside linebacker Eric Boggs and outside linebackers Devan Stringer and Kennan Gilchrist.

Senior defensive back Doug Middleton picked off a team-high four passes last year and will anchor an experienced secondary. Corner Brandon Pinckney is a new starter, but Satterfield says he has full faith in the sophomore.

Previewing Appalachian State’s Specialists for 2015

After averaging 40.7 yards per punt, junior Bentlee Critcher has a firm grip on a starting spot. Senior Zach Matics is expected to once again handle the kicking duties. Satterfield expects seniors Bobo Beathard and Simms McElfresh to join sophomore Isaiah Lewis on return duties.

Final Analysis

The transition from FCS powerhouse to Sun Belt newcomer was likely a jarring one for Mountaineers fans who fondly recall the heady days of winning national titles and authoring an all-time great upset at Michigan. But this season should provide them with a pleasant taste of their new normal.

By finishing third in the Sun Belt last season, the Mountaineers showed they could compete. With loads of experience back and plenty of confidence banked from last year’s strong finish, there’s no reason to believe this season can’t be even better.

Throw in the fact that the Mountaineers could now earn a bowl invite — they were barred from it last season — and have a schedule that features home games against league heavyweights UL-Lafayette, Arkansas State and longtime Southern Conference rival Georgia Southern, and life on the FBS level should begin to feel just right.


#87 UL Lafayette Ragin' Cajuns





HEAD COACH: Mark Hudspeth, 36-16 (4 years) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Jay Johnson | DEF. COORDINATOR: Charlie Harbison, Melvin Smith

In each of Mark Hudspeth's four seasons, UL Lafayette has gone 9-4 and finished the year playing in the New Orleans Bowl. This year's Ragin' Cajuns could keep each of these streaks alive, but to do so it will need to rely on new starters at key positions, including quarterback, as well as a new defensive coaching staff.

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Previewing UL Lafayette’s Offense for 2015

Certainly the Ragin’ Cajuns’ offense wasn’t prolific a year ago. It finished 10th in the Sun Belt in passing offense, fourth in rushing offense and sixth in total offense. But it was efficient, finishing No. 1 in the league in red-zone offense. This season, with the departures of quarterback Terrance Broadway, leading receiver James Butler and bruising running back Alonza Harris, Louisiana-Lafayette will ask another player to lead the way — running back Elijah McGuire, the 2014 Sun Belt Player of the Year and Offensive Player of the Year.

McGuire won’t have to share the ball with Harris, and he’s expected to continue to catch passes out of the backfield after he was second on the team in receiving yards last season. He’s even going to be the punt returner. While he shared the spotlight a year ago, the Cajuns’ offense will be geared toward getting him the ball as often as possible this year.

Yet if the Cajuns are to excel offensively, others must step forward, especially at quarterback. Three players who appeared in just six games combined last season — juniors Brooks Haack and Jalen Nixon and redshirt freshman Jordan Davis — will battle to replace Broadway. There is talent at wide receiver in Al Riles, Jamal Robinson and C.J. Bates. And while the offensive line is looking for two new starters, All-Sun Belt candidates Mykhael Quave and Grant Horst return. 

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing UL Lafayette’s Defense for 2015

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This unit will have a different look. That’s because there are some new faces on the defensive staff, led by co-defensive coordinators Charlie Harbison (outside linebackers) and Melvin Smith (defensive backs), both of whom make their way to Lafayette from Auburn. They bring along Levorn Harbin to coach the defensive line, and the trio has helped instill a different mindset and approach on that side of the football, one that showed signs of improvement in spring drills.

The defense didn’t dominate the Sun Belt stats, but it placed well in areas that mattered such as second in scoring defense and No. 1 in red-zone defense. The Cajuns allowed 405.8 yards per game, including a league-worst 263.6 passing yards, and improving those numbers has been a point of emphasis.

The Cajuns are loaded at linebacker with Dominique Tovell, Tre’maine Lightfoot and Otha Peters. The problem area is on the defensive line, where standouts Christian Ringo and Justin Hamilton have moved on. Chris Prater and Miami transfer Jacoby Briscoe will be expected to step forward there. The secondary, also missing some key players from a year ago, will lean on Troy McCollum and T.J. Worthy.

Previewing UL Lafayette’s Specialists for 2015

The return game will have experience, with McGuire expected to be used on punt returns and Montrel Carter back on kickoff returns. The concern from an experience standpoint is with the kicking duties. Dylan Scheurich and Stevie Artigue will battle for the placekicking job in preseason camp. At punter, Australian Steven Coutts caught the attention of coach Mark Hudspeth in spring drills, and the job appears to be his.

Final Analysis

This is a program that has thrived under Hudspeth’s leadership, and the Cajuns are expected to continue to enjoy success again this year. They have posted four consecutive 9–4 records and four straight New Orleans Bowl appearances. While competition will be strong, Lafayette is expected to contend for the Sun Belt title once again. There is concern based on inexperience at a couple of key positions, most notably quarterback and on the defensive line, but there is also a confidence among those in the program based on recent success.