Appalachian State Mountaineers

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2014 PRESEASON TOP 25

#123 Appalachian State Mountaineers

NATIONAL FORECAST

#123

Sun Belt PREDICTION

#8

HEAD COACH: Scott Satterfield, 4-8 (1 year) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Dwayne Ledford, Frank Ponce | DEF. COORDINATOR: Nate Woody

The 2014 college football season starts on Aug. 27 and continues into mid-January with the first edition of the four-team playoff. Athlon Sports is counting down until kickoff with projections and previews for all 128 FBS teams. Here is our team preview for No. 123 Appalachian State.

Previewing Appalachian State’s Offense for 2014:

As the quarterbacks coach during Appalachian State’s string of three FCS titles less than a decade ago, second-year head coach Scott Satterfield is used to seeing the Mountaineers thrive on offense. After seeing a dip in scoring and several other categories last season, stability in several spots means they should move back toward that familiar form.

Kameron Bryant is back for his second season as Appalachian State’s starting quarterback. He threw for more than 2,700 yards and completed 71.2 percent of his passes. Bryant isn’t the same running threat that some of Satterfield’s former charges were, but with an offense that takes advantage of the junior’s accurate arm, the Mountaineers’ spread look should still be tough to stop.

Sophomore running back Marcus Cox, who rushed for 1,250 yards last season, will have a veteran offensive line to work behind and some help in freshman running back Terrence Upshaw.

The one area on offense in which the Mountaineers will see significant turnover is at receiver. Since only three of Bryant’s top targets return from last season, Satterfield expects the six new faces he’s brought in to make an impact.

Previewing Appalachian State’s Defense for 2014: 

Last season was a period of transition for Appalachian State’s defense. New defensive coordinator Nate Woody, a longtime assistant at Southern Conference rival Wofford, brought in a 3-4 look that took some time for the young Mountaineers to grasp.

Satterfield says that while this season’s group will still be largely comprised of young players, he sees progress.

Senior Ronald Blair will lead a defensive line that should also receive major contributions from defensive ends Deuce Robinson and Olawale Dada and nose tackles Darian Small and Tyson Fernandez. The group will try to better the eight sacks it accrued last season.

Outside linebackers Rashaad Townes and Kennan Gilchrist also had strong springs and should push for playing time. Along with John Law, who racked up 71 tackles last year, they’ll have to offset the loss of last season’s leading tackler Karl Anderson.
A young secondary is the lone question mark facing the defense. But with a large group of potential contributors, the Mountaineers believe there are answers out there.

Previewing Appalachian State’s Specialists for 2014: 

Punter Bentlee Critcher was a pleasant surprise last season, going from freshman walk-on to third-team FCS All-American. After averaging 45.9 yards per punt — the second-best mark in school history — Critcher has a firm grip on the job. Zach Matics will take over the rest of the kicking duties after handling kickoffs last season. The return game will be sorted out in the preseason.

Final Analysis

One of the dominant programs in the Southern Conference and on the FCS level for decades, Appalachian State is on the brink of its first season in the FBS ranks.

The Mountaineers — who matched their lowest win total since 1993 last season — will face several challenges, like depth issues stemming from the push to reach their full complement of scholarships and a lineup of new Sun Belt Conference opponents. So for a team and a fan base that’s used to success, this season could be a big adjustment.

But if things are kept in perspective, there’s reason for optimism.

While on the staff at Florida International, Satterfield did win a Sun Belt title, so he understands what Appalachian State is up against. And with a team that will lean on young talent, there’s reason to believe that the Mountaineers will eventually be a force in their new league. Still, there’s a strong chance their first taste of FBS life — which begins with a trip to Michigan, site of their unforgettable 2007 upset — will have some bumpy moments.