Eastern Michigan Eagles

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2015 PRESEASON TOP 25

#127 Eastern Michigan Eagles

NATIONAL FORECAST

#127

MAC West PREDICTION

#6

HEAD COACH: Chris Creighton, 2-10 (1 year) | OFF. COORDINATOR: Kalen DeBoer | DEF. COORDINATOR: Brad McCaslin

If history is any indication, Year Two is a good time for a Chris Creighton team. His team at Wabash improved from 8-2 to 12-1, and his team at Drake improved from 6-5 to 8-3. Eastern Michigan, though, is one of college football’s worst programs. Reaching four wins — and thus doubling the win total — would mark an achievement EMU has reached just once since 2007.

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Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Offense for 2015 
 

Reginald Bell breathed some life into EMU’s offense when he settled into the starting role at quarterback midway through the 2014 season. The dual-threat signal caller put up more than 300 total yards of offense in a 37–27 win over Buffalo — highlighted by a pair of 70-yard touchdown runs — and threw for 409 yards in a 45–30 loss to Ball State late in the season. Bell, a former state champion in track out of California, has the chance to be a dynamic playmaker as a sophomore if the offense can develop around him. 

Eastern Michigan needs more production out of its undersized receiving corps. The Eagles’ 2015 recruiting class includes five talented wide receivers, but they might not be ready to jump straight into the lineup. Senior Dustin Creel has the potential to turn into a go-to target. He had 46 catches and 593 yards as a sophomore in 2013 but was slowed by a knee injury last fall. 

The other challenge for the Eagles offense will be replacing three starters — Campbell Allison, Lincoln Hansen and Robert McFadden — on the offensive line. They are building around returning starter Andrew Wylie, who will step in for Hansen at right tackle. 

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Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Defense for 2015 
 

There is no way to sugarcoat just how poorly the  Eastern Michigan defense performed last season. The Eagles allowed 40.9 points and 498.8 yards per game and forced only 12 turnovers. All three figures ranked among the 10 worst in the nation. 

The players, who were learning their third defensive system in three years, looked lost at times. A second year with the same defense — plus the return of seven starters — should provide EMU with the building blocks for turning the unit around. 

The Eagles have strong depth at linebacker, where leading tackler Great Ibe is part of a group of returning starters that also includes Hunter Matt and Anthony Zappone. Ike Spearman, who missed all last season with a leg injury, was given a medical redshirt and will be back in the mix as well. 

Eastern Michigan’s most talented player on either side of the ball is defensive lineman Pat O’Connor, who had 64 tackles, 7.5 sacks and two forced fumbles last season. He can line up on the inside or outside and is someone for whom offenses need to account. But he needs some help. 

The secondary has a lot of moving pieces and is still an area of concern. Safety Jason Beck and cornerback DaQuan Pace are the returning starters in the group. Beck started as a true freshman last season and continues to make strides. Junior college transfer Ikie Calderon brought a lot of energy in the spring at safety.  

Related: Athlon's 2015 College Football Rankings: No. 1 to 128

Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Specialists for 2015 
 

Tyler Allen rewrote EMU’s record books as the team’s primary kickoff returner the past two seasons. Replacing him will not be easy. Placekicker Dylan Mulder returns after a solid season in which he hit 8-of-12 attempts, including three from beyond 40 yards. The Eagles were poor covering both kickoffs and punts last season, areas that need to improve going forward. 

Final Analysis 
 

Eastern Michigan lacks the top-level talent and depth to make a big move in the MAC West this season, but second-year coach Chris Creighton is moving the team in the right direction. The Eagles have finished 2–10 in each of the past three seasons, but a more favorable schedule — with three home games in September and six overall — could help them exceed that win total. For a program that hasn’t had a winning season since 1995, three or four wins would certainly be something to build on.




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COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2014 PRESEASON TOP 25

#124 Eastern Michigan Eagles

NATIONAL FORECAST

#124

MAC West PREDICTION

#6

HEAD COACH: Chris Creighton, First Year | OFF. COORDINATOR: Kalen DeBoer | DEF. COORDINATOR: Brad McCaslin

The 2014 college football season starts on Aug. 27 and continues into mid-January with the first edition of the four-team playoff. Athlon Sports is counting down until kickoff with projections and previews for all 128 FBS teams. Here is our team preview for No. 124 Eastern Michigan.

Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Offense for 2014: 

As bad as the 2–10 Eagles were in 2013, running back Bronson Hill proved to be a difference-maker, rushing for 1,101 yards with a 5.6 yards-per-carry average. It was the first 1,000-plus yard rushing season for an Eastern Michigan running back in a decade. Hill, a third-team All-MAC selection, will be a critical piece of first-year coach Chris Creighton’s offense.

Hill and the other Eastern running backs aren’t likely to carry the load as much under Creighton as they did under former coach Ron English. In 2013, the Eagles ran the ball on 57 percent of their offensive snaps. That was down from 59 percent in 2012. Creighton wants to be closer to a 50-50 team and is particularly excited about the prospect of sophomore quarterback Brogan Roback getting the ball into the hands of his wide receivers out of multiple offensive formations.

Roback, a Maumee, Ohio, native, is one of the highest-recruited players to sign with Eastern in decades. He was thrown into the fire as a freshman when EMU’s season began to spin out of control, replacing Tyler Benz and starting the final three games of the season. Benz has since left the team, leaving Roback as the only quarterback with any experience on the roster. Roback threw for 640 yards and four touchdowns with five interceptions and a completion percentage of 42.2 in 2013.
What the Eagles lack in experience under center, they make up for at receiver and on the offensive line. Eastern brings back its top four pass-catchers, most notably second-team All-MAC tight end Tyreese Russell, and three of its five starting lineman. Right tackle Lincoln Hansen, a third-team all-conference pick in 2013, is the headliner.

Of course bringing back a bunch of players that contributed to one of the worst teams in college football in 2013 isn’t necessarily a good thing.

Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Defense for 2014: 

Eastern gave up an average of 510.8 yards and 45.2 points per game in 2013, which both ranked in the bottom 10 in the country. It was enough to drive English, who was defensive coordinator as well as head coach, mad. A tape of an expletive-filled rant from English — recorded during a defensive meeting — expedited his inevitable firing by three games.

Eastern shouldn’t have to worry about any more rants — Creighton doesn’t allow players or coaches in his program to swear. He may want to give the policy a second thought after seeing his defense. The Eagles are thin at nearly every position, particularly in the defensive backfield. Ike Spearman, who led the team in tackles with 82 and tied for the lead in interceptions with two, should provide stability at the linebacker position. Creighton believes the defensive line will be where his team is deepest.

Previewing Eastern Michigan’s Specialists for 2014:

Tyler Allen accumulated 1,014 yards in kickoff returns in 2013. Allen, combined with punt returners Jay Jones and true freshman Cameron Bouldin, could make Eastern dangerous in the return game. Dylan Mulder made only 6-of-11 field goals as a sophomore. Austin Barnes returns as the punter.

Final Analysis

Eastern is not the type of program that can be fixed overnight by any coach, let alone one with zero experience — as a player, assistant or head coach — at the FBS level, although no experience should be required to improve upon the four wins Eastern has accumulated the past two seasons. Creighton has a solid résumé, with an overall record of 139–46 as a head coach with stops at Ottawa (NAIA), Wabash (Division III) and Drake (FCS). His task at Eastern Michigan is immense. The Eagles have not had a winning season since 1995 and have been one of the worst FBS programs in the nation in recent years.




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