Vanderbilt Commodores

Unpublished

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2014 PRESEASON TOP 25

#44 Vanderbilt Commodores

NATIONAL FORECAST

#44

SEC East PREDICTION

#6

HEAD COACH: Derek Mason, First Year | OFF. COORDINATOR: Karl Dorrell | DEF. COORDINATOR: David Kotulski

The 2014 college football season starts on Aug. 27 and continues into mid-January with the first edition of the four-team playoff. Athlon Sports is counting down until kickoff with projections and previews for all 128 FBS teams. Here is our team preview for No. 44 Vanderbilt.

Previewing Vanderbilt’s Offense for 2014:

Vanderbilt must replace a pair of wide receivers who accounted for 92 percent of the team’s production at the position, but the primary focus for first-year coach Derek Mason during preseason camp will be to identify a starting quarterback. Patton Robinette played a key role in some great moments last season — a comeback win over Georgia, a road victory at Florida, the winning touchdown at Tennessee — but the sophomore is far from a lock to earn the starting assignment. Robinette, a good athlete who lacks elite arm strength, will face stiff competition from redshirt freshman Johnny McCrary and Stephen Rivers, a transfer from LSU.

Whoever wins the job — and don’t be surprised if it’s Rivers — will be lacking proven playmakers at the wide receiver position. The new staff plans on incorporating tight ends (think Stanford) and running backs in the passing game, but the Dores will need some young wide receivers to take on much larger roles in 2014.

Mason is looking for big tailbacks to pound the ball between the tackles. He inherited what has to be the smallest running back duo in the SEC — Jerron Seymour (5'7", 200) and Brian Kimbrow (5'8", 185). Despite this duo’s shortcomings, the running game should be improved after a lackluster performance last fall.

Mason singled out the line as the strength of the offense during the spring. The Dores must replace All-SEC tackle Wesley Johnson, but otherwise this unit returns largely intact.

Previewing Vanderbilt’s Defense for 2014:

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Vanderbilt’s move to the 3-4 has forced some reshuffling on the front seven. Last year’s defensive ends are now outside linebackers. Last year’s defensive tackles are either ends or nose guards. The biggest beneficiary of the new scheme could be Vince Taylor, a 6'2", 310-pound senior. “Vince will be as good as any nose (guard) or interior player in this conference,” Mason says.

Mason and the defensive staff spent the spring reprogramming the Commodores’ talented corps of inside linebackers. “These guys need to be thumpers,” he says. “(Last year), they were edge players. They ran around blocks. That is not what we do.” Kyle Woestmann and Caleb Azubike, who were pass-rushing ends last season, should make a smooth transition to outside linebacker.

The Commodores must replace four seniors in the secondary who combined to start 110 games over the last four seasons. There is, however, a decent amount of experience returning. Many of the young defensive backs were forced into duty late last season due to injuries. Paris Head and Torren McGaster gained the most experience at corner last year, but Darrius Sims also saw some action as a true freshman. Mason also has been pleased with redshirt freshmen Taurean Ferguson and Tre Bell. Oren Burks was recruited as a linebacker but has been moved to safety. He received praise from Mason throughout the spring.

Previewing Vanderbilt’s Specialists for 2014:

Finding a reliable replacement for standout placekicker Carey Spear will be of paramount importance. Redshirt freshman Tommy Openshaw is atop the depth chart for now. Taylor Hudson handled most of the punting last year but lost his job late in the season to Colby Cooke.

Final Analysis 

Mason is in uncharted territory for a first-year football coach at Vanderbilt. Unlike the vast majority of men who have occupied his seat, Mason is not facing a massive rebuild. The former defensive coordinator at Stanford inherits a program that has won 18 games over the last two seasons and been to three straight bowl games. There is enough talent on the roster to extend the postseason streak to four, but some playmakers need to emerge on offense, and the defense must adapt to a very different style of play for this team to finish higher than sixth in the SEC East.




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