The 2014 Final Four Dream Team

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Picking the best players for every spot on the ultimate roster

The 2014 Final Four Dream Team

The Final Four is a collection of fine players, but like the NCAA Tournament as a whole, the diverse pieces make for a more interesting puzzle.

The stars have been stars on the way to the Final Four, including UConn’s Shabazz Napier, Wisconsin’s Frank Kaminsky and Florida’s Scottie Wilbekin.

Meanwhile, the four teams in North Texas wouldn’t be here without some players taking the next step (Kentucky’s Aaron Harrison) or those that emerged from nowhere (Kentucky’s Marcus Lee).

Rather than ranking the top prospects or picking the best players, Athlon Sports put together the ultimate Final Four roster from the four teams that will face off Saturday.

Most indispensable: Shabazz Napier, UConn
No player means more to his team than Napier does to Connecticut. Just think of how many categories he could fill on this list below: He is UConn’s clutch shotmaker from inside and out. He’s an 86.6 percent free throw shooter. And he’s an excellent rebounder for a guard with a team-leading 5.9 boards per game. As long as Napier keeps up his 23.3 points per game pace in the Tourney, comparisons to Kemba Walker will only increase if UConn wins another game.

Floor general: Scottie Wilbekin, Florida
Wilbekin hasn’t turned the ball over since midway through the first half against Pittsburgh ... in the round of 32. That’s more than two and a half games without coughing up the ball. His assist numbers are down a bit (3.0), but Wilbekin has answered the question of who is going to be Florida’s go-to scorer in the Tournament. He’s averaging 16.8 points in the Tourney, including two buzzer beaters at the end of first halves in four games.

Sharpshooter: Michael Frazier II, Florida
More than three-quarters of Frazier’s attempts from the field have come from 3-point range. Frazier has also been efficient on all those long shots, converting 44.8 percent. That’s significantly better than other jump-shooting specialists in the Final Four, Wisconsin’s Ben Brust (39.2 percent) and Kentucky’s James Young (34.6 percent)

Shotmaker: Aaron Harrison, Kentucky
Aaron Harrison’s emergence has been one of the keys for the Wildcats in the NCAA Tournament, allowing Kentucky to start to play like the team the Wildcats were expected to be early in the season. Harrison is leading Kentucky at 16 points per game in the NCAA Tournament, highlighted by his game-winner against Michigan. The Wolverines could not have defended Harrison any better, but the 3 fell to send Kentucky to the Final Four.



Matchup nightmare: Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin
Arizona, one of the nation’s best defensive teams with big men Aaron Gordon and Kaleb Tarczewski, were lost against the 7-foot Kaminsky. The revelation of Wisconsin's season has his share of post moves, but he's also the kind of outside shooting threat that befuddles bigger defenders. Kaminsky hit 3 of 5 3-pointers in the win over Arizona in the Elite Eight.

Pure talent: Julius Randle, Kentucky
Of all the superstars in this freshman class, Randle is the only one still playing. Randle will have to wait to find out if his draft stock is significantly improved as a result of the Tournament, but the last two weeks certainly haven’t hurt. Randle has picked up a double-double in every Tournament game, averaging 16 points and 12 rebounds per game.

Mr. Universe: Patric Young, Florida
Young has looked like the most physically dominant player on the court for several seasons. He’s also among the hardest-working players in the Final Four. He’s been quiet on the score sheet, but he had four blocked shots against both Pittsburgh and Dayton. He's also the best recruiting tool for Florida's strength program.

Glue guy: Josh Gasser, Wisconsin
Florida’s Patric Young was named the captain of Seth Davis’ annual all-glue team on SI.com, but we’ve already slotted the Gators senior elsewhere. On our Final Four Dream Team, we’ll go with another one of Davis’ glue guys in Gasser. The senior is a capable point guard who moved to make room for Traevon Jackson while losing none of his offensive efficiency or perimeter defense.

Mr. Clutch: Traevon Jackson, Wisconsin
Perhaps this pick is counterintuitive with players like Napier and Wilbekin on he team, not to mention Aaron Harrison, the owner of the game-winning 3 to beat Michigan. Jackson isn’t quite as dramatic, but just as effective. His free throw shooting late has been critical. Jackson has made 36 of 44 free throw attempts in the final four minutes of games decided by 10 points or fewer, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Defensive difference-maker: Ryan Boatright, UConn
Boatright has been more than a complement to Napier in the Huskies, though he’s been solid in the last four games. Boatright has averaged 13.8 points in the Tournament, but his biggest contribution was four steals against Michigan State.

Defensive specialist: Will Yeguete, Florida
The Gators forward averages only five points per game, but he’s also Florida’s best interior defender. Yeguete averages 5.2 rebounds per game, third on the team, but he leads the Gators in defensive rebound rate.

Sixth man: Nigel Hayes, Wisconsin
Hayes is a physical 6-7, 250-pound freshman with a bright future, but Wisconsin has plenty of veterans. Hayes has made the most of his time, though. His 17.7 points per 40 minutes is second only to Kaminsky among Wisconsin regulars.

X-factor: DeAndre Daniels, UConn
UConn is often criticized as a team with a major size disadvantage. That may be true, but it’s not nearly as pronounced when Daniels is playing the way he has during the last month. The 6-foot-9 forward is averaging 16.1 points and 7.4 rebounds since March 8, including 28 points and 10 rebounds in the Sweet 16 against Iowa State.

Sleeping giant: Sam Dekker, Wisconsin
The Badgers forward is averaging 9.3 points and 6 rebounds in the NCAA Tournament, scoring only seven points apiece against Baylor and Arizona in the regional. Wisconsin has come this far without Dekker being a major focal point. The Badgers could be national champions if he approaches his season averages.

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