College Basketball 2013-14 Midseason Coaches of the Year

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The Midseason Report kicks off the top 10 coaching performances so far

College Basketball Midseason Coaches of the Year

Some of the best coaching in 2013-14 is anything but a youth movement.

Veteran coaches — seasoned veterans, even — have done some of their best work at the midpoint of 2013-14.

True, some of our picks for the top coaches of the year this season are on the young side. Josh Pastner, Fred Hoiberg and Derek Kellogg were all born in the 1970s. Jay Wright, Gregg Marshall, Fran McCaffery and Mike Lonergan are a long way from getting senior citizen discounts.

But some of the most impressive coaching performances this season belong to Jim Boeheim, 69, Steve Fisher, 68, and Bo Ryan, 66. Among them, the three coaches have only one loss.

This week marks the midpoint between the first college basketball games of the season and Selection Sunday, and Athlon Sports will recap all the major developments of the season this week in the College Basketball Midseason Report.

Midseason Coaches of the Year

1. Bo Ryan, Wisconsin
Anyone who thinks Wisconsin plays one kind of style, take note the Badgers have won games in the 40s (once), 50s (once), 60s (twice), 70s (six times), 80s, four times), 90s (once) and 100s (once). Ryan is automatic for a top-four finish in the Big Ten, but thanks to breakouts by Traevon Jackson and Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin can shoot for a Big Ten title and a run in the NCAA Tournament. The Badgers’ offensive efficiency rating has improved from 108th last season to fourth.

2. Steve Fisher, San Diego State
Hard to believe Fisher is in his 15th season at San Diego State. The veteran coach has turned the Aztecs into a regular NCAA contender, but this may be his finest coaching job yet. Without Jamaal Franklin and Chase Tapley, San Diego State is still 14-1 with its only loss at home to Arizona on Nov. 14. The Aztecs may have the best win of any team this season with a 61-57 win in Lawrence for Kansas’ first non-conference home loss since 2006.

3. Gregg Marshall, Wichita State
The Shockers have won 21 of their last 22 games with the only loss in the Final Four to Louisville. As Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet have become regulars, Wichita State may have a stronger team that it did a year ago. Only two teams all season — Tennessee State and DePaul — have scored more than 70 points against Wichita State this season.

4. Fred Hoiberg, Iowa State
Few coaches have navigated the transfer market quite like Hoiberg, who added Marshall’s DeAndre Kane and junior college transfer Dustin Hogue to this season’s team. The new pieces in the lineup hasn’t harmed the Iowa State offense, which remains one of the most effective in the country for the second consecutive season. The next question may be to adapt to a roster without Kane in the short term.

5. Jay Wright, Villanova
Villanova became the Big East favorite thanks to wins over Kansas and Iowa in the Battle 4 Atlantis. The key has been more consistency on offense, particularly within the 3-point line. Villanova still takes a ton of 3s, but its production from 2-point range has improved from 46 percent to 55.5 percent.

6. Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
The Hall of Fame coach doesn’t need too many more tips of the cap, but he’ll get them anyway this season. Boeheim didn’t necessarily plan to play a freshman point guard this season until Michael Carter-Williams’ broke out meant he could head to the NBA Draft. Freshman Tyler Ennis has been superb, and Jerami Grant has been a breakout performer for an undefeated team.

7. Josh Pastner, Memphis
Pastner may be Exhibit A that it takes a few years for someone to find his legs as a head coach. A shortage of big wins in his first four seasons made him an easy target, but he won’t hear about it anymore. Pastner has picked up his first two wins over ranked teams in his career and neither were at the FedEx Forum — Oklahoma State in Orlando and Louisville on the road. Memphis is struggling from the 3-point line and free throw line, but this may end up as Memphis’ best team of the Pastner era.

8. Derek Kellogg, UMass
Kellogg needed six seasons to get to this point, but the Minutemen may have their best team since 1996, when John Calipari led UMass to a 35-2 season and the Final Four. If not, UMass likely is still headed to its first NCAA Tournament since 1998. Led by dynamic point guard Chaz Williams, UMass is a veteran team that could do damage in March. The Minutemen’s only loss this season is by five on a neutral court to Florida State.

9. Fran McCaffery, Iowa
Aside from the temper tantrum that landed him a one-game suspension and aided a loss to Wisconsin, McCaffery has done a remarkable rebuilding job at Iowa. The Hawkeyes’ 84-74 win over Ohio State in Columbus on Saturday checked two key boxes this season — a road win and a victory over a top-10 team. McCaffery has been building a veteran core for this team, which could be Iowa’s first NCAA team since 2006.

10. Mike Lonergan, George Washington
The Colonials have lost two of the last four, both on the road, to Kansas State and La Salle, but Lonergan’s team should be in the thick of the Atlantic 10 race. George Washington has resume-building wins over Creighton and Maryland in the non-conference schedule. Transfers have found new life under Lonergan, most notably leading scorer Maurice Creek from Indiana and Isaiah Armwood from Villanova two seasons ago. George Washington should have its first 20-win season since 2007 and perhaps its first NCAA bid since the same year.

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