Appreciate the Hassle: Players' Rules for Media Day

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How players make their way through the media day cattle drive

Appreciate the Hassle: Players' Rules for Media Day

HOOVER, Ala. — In baseball, most pinch-hitters take their at-bat and head back to the dugout. It’s one hitter, one pitcher and the day is done.

Auburn tight end C.J. Uzomah pinch hit for more than three hours, taking the best (and sadly, the worst) the SEC media contingent had to offer.

When Auburn coach Gus Malzahn pulled his SEC champion quarterback Nick Marshall from the media day roster Monday, he called on Uzomah.

Instead of a quarterback who passed for more than 1,900 yards and rushed for more than 1,000, Uzomah and his 17 career receptions represented Auburn at media day. Instead of a quarterback who had just been cited for marijuana possession over the weekend, Auburn sent a senior who otherwise expected to enjoy a quiet Monday.

“It is a privilege and a reward to represent Auburn here at the SEC Media Days,” Malzahn said. “Last Friday Nick lost that privilege.”

But is it really a privilege, hearing the same questions over and over again, many of which were the same questions back in the spring and the fall? There’s a way for a player to survive media day. Here’s what we learned from following Uzomah and asking some seasoned vets for the survival guide.

As Alabama quarterback-turned-ESPN and Sirius XM host Greg McElroy says, “appreciate the hassle.”

Lead image borrowed from @SEC.

 

Rule 1: Call mom
 

The first call to replace Marshall went from Mazlahn to Uzomah. The second was from Uzomah to mom.

 

Some teams will show up in suits. Some will show up in team polos. Auburn went for suits, and Uzomah didn’t have one on campus.

Never underestimate mom’s devotion to make a kid look good. His mom drove two-and-half hours from Suwanee, Ga., to Auburn, Ala., to bring him his suit.

Maybe mom didn’t bring dress socks. Maybe she did, but Uzomah wasn’t going to pass on a chance to turn his socks into a conversation piece. Uzomah is a U.S. soccer fan and used red, white and blue socks with a small flag hanging off the ankle.

Like Uzomah, Florida’s Dante Fowler called mom for a trip to Men’s Warehouse. Mom picked out the suit, but Fowler needed to accessorize.

“I saw a bow tie, and I said as long as I get this bow tie I’m fine,” Fowler said. “(Defensive lineman) Alex McCallister tied it for me. It was too tight on my neck, but Alex is 6-7 so his long arms helped out.”

Rule 2: Prep for questions


Even on media day, players need to put in some study time. Media has its own tendencies just like any offense or defense.

All of Auburn’s players had to answer to some degree for Marshall. Did he address the team (he did). Does he still have the team’s trust (he does).

“We prepared just like it was a game,” Uzomah said.

When McElroy came for media day before his senior season in 2010, he and his teammates knew most of the questions that were going to be asked.

“What’s Nick Saban like? What’s Trent (Richardson) like? What’s Mark Ingram like? Can you win the national championship? Can you do it again?” McElroy said. “We knew what the questions are going to be.”

 

THE SCHEDULE

 

Here’s where C.J. Uzomah was for SEC Media Day:
11:50-12:00 Radio
12:00-12:10 Fox Sports South
12:10-12:30 TV
12:30-12:50 Print/Online Media
12:50-1:10 ESPN
1:10-1:20 CBS.com
1:20-1:30 CBS
1:30-1:40 SEC Video
1:40-1:50 Sirius XM
1:50-2:00 SEC Radio
2:00-2:10 ESPN.com
2:10-2:40 Radio Row

 

Jeff Driskel, another veteran quarterback, knew the drill Monday, too, although no one was going to ask about going to the national championship game.

He plopped himself down in front of the media horde.

“Do I just pick someone?”

Answer: “Yes”

“All right. Let’s do this.”

Then the standard series of questions on Florida’s new hurry-up offense, Will Muschamp on the hot seat, and his recovery from a broken right leg.

“I’m feeling great ... thanks for asking.”


Rule 3: Stay on schedule


There’s one person on media day whose influence trumps anyone but the coach: The 5-foot-4 woman keeping players on schedule from the main print media room to breakout rooms for SEC broadcast rights holders ESPN and CBS.

Uzomah may be on a roll. The lingering media may still have follow ups. Two more questions in the media pool means two more questions. Exactly.

“She’s the boss,” Uzomah said as he was whisked from newspaper reporters to TV reporters.

And a harsh reminder for reporters: The follow-up to the last question doesn’t start the clock over again.

“They always want to ask more questions,” grumbled one of Monday’s timekeepers.

 

 

Rule 4: Have patience


Not only is Uzomah pinch-hitting. He’s putting in extra time.

A radio row trip isn’t on the schedule, but Auburn wants to get its player to local radio outlets and another in the Atlanta area, where Uzomah played in high school.

The first question in one interview with Uzomah: “Is it ‘Ooh-zah-mah’ or ‘Ooh-zoe-mah?’” Answer: Ooh-zah-mah.

The final statement in said interview: “We’re here with C.J. ‘Ooh-zoe-mah.’”

In between: Several questions about Nick Marshall and yet more questions about how Auburn’s spread offense can improve.

“To me, it was a bit of a drag,” McElroy said. “Because it's room after room. You can’t hit everyone all at once, you’re hitting different questions at different times. I remember leaving here and taking a nap on the way home.”


Rule 5: Embrace the fans


The circus atmosphere of a media day is ramped up a notch for Auburn and Alabama in Hoover. The lobby of the Hyatt Regency on the day the Iron Bowl rivals speak is often laced with dozens of fans from 8 a.m. until the afternoon.

As Uzomah exited the main media ballroom onto radio row — the collection of stations conducting live radio shows in the Hyatt Regency lobby — he was greeted at the end of the escalator with chants of “War Eagle.”

In the middle of a TV interview, a fan walks by and says, “War Eagle.” Uzomah interrupts his own answer to respond in kind.

Uzomah is in the final minutes of being herded like cattle from interview to interview to autograph seekers back to interviews. Is this a privilege or a penance?

“I love it,” Uzomah said. “I’m having fun.”

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