College Football's 10 Worst Head Coaches for 2012

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The jury is out on whether Frank Spaziani can get Boston College back to a bowl.

<p> Athlon ranks the 10 worst coaches in college football.</p>

Whether a college football coach is entering his first season or coming off a national championship, all are under heavy scrutinty. And just like the best coaches in the NCAA, the record isn't always a true indicator of success or bad coaching. As the 2012 season inches closer, Athlon continues its spring preview with a look at the 10 worst coaches in college football. Although some of these coaches are unproven, their resume is unproven and on paper, a bad hire for the program. If we had to make a head coaching hire tomorrow, these 10 coaches would be at the bottom of our list. 

College Football’s Top 10 Worst Coaches

1. Carl Pelini, FAU (First Year)
Considering FAU has watched its win total decline in each of the last four seasons, hiring Pelini to rebuild the program is a curious move. Pelini has no head coaching experience on the collegiate level and one has to wonder how much control he had over the defense at Nebraska despite the title of defensive coordinator the last four years. Pelini also has no ties to the Florida area, which is certainly a concern for the Owls in recruiting. Although he has yet to coach a game, it’s hard to find reasons to think Pelini will work out as FAU’s head coach.

2. Kevin Wilson, Indiana (1-11, 1 year)
Indiana is not an easy place to win, but Wilson’s first season in Bloomington was not pretty. The Hoosiers lost to Ball State and North Texas, with their only victory coming against South Carolina State (38-21). Indiana did not win a Big Ten game for the first time since 1995 and only one conference game was decided by seven points or less. The Hoosiers played a handful of young players last year, so there’s plenty of hope for 2012 and beyond. Wilson still has plenty to prove, as this is his first head coaching gig on the college football level, and the Hoosiers may have been the worst BCS team last year.

3. Dan Enos, Central Michigan (6-18, 2 years)
Enos inherited a program that won at least eight games in each of the last four seasons prior to his arrival and claimed three MAC titles during that span. Instead of building upon that success, Enos has led the program to a disappointing 6-18 record and finds himself squarely on the hot seat in 2012. Although Enos came to Mount Pleasant after the departure of some key players (quarterback Dan LeFevour and wide receiver Antonio Brown), Central Michigan has underachieved the last two years and will struggle to finish higher than fourth in the MAC West in 2012.

4. Bobby Hauck, UNLV (4-21, 2 years)
Hiring a coach from Montana hasn’t exactly turned out well for a couple of FBS programs. Mick Dennehy compiled a 39-12 record with the Grizzlies, but went 19-37 in five years with Utah State. Joe Glenn went 39-6 in three years with Montana, but went 30-41 in six seasons with Wyoming. Hauck followed Glenn in Missoula and posted an 80-17 record, but has experienced very little success since coming to UNLV. Although the cupboard was less then full when Hauck inherited the team, the Rebels have failed to show much progress and was blown out by FCS opponent Southern Utah last year. Hauck will be allowed a few years to right the ship, but there’s little to suggest UNLV will post a winning mark in 2012.

5. Frank Spaziani, Boston College (20-19, 3 years)
Boston College has been trending in the wrong direction over the last three seasons, and Spaziani will likely need a winning record to return in 2012. The Eagles won 20 games in two seasons under Jeff Jagodzinski, but Spaziani has been unable to continue that momentum, and Boston College’s win total has declined over the last three years. Jagodzinski didn’t exactly leave a full cupboard for Spaziani, but the Eagles have shown little progress under his watch and a very challenging 2012 schedule will make it difficult for this team to get bowl eligible. 

6. Joker Phillips, Kentucky (11-14, 2 years)
Thanks to the victory over Tennessee in the season finale, Phillips may have bought himself a little more time in Lexington. However, there’s definitely some uneasiness over the direction of the program. Phillips inherited a team that was coming off four consecutive bowl appearances, but the win total has declined over the last two years. Although Kentucky ended up with five victories last season, there were close calls against Western Kentucky and Central Michigan and a 30-point loss to Vanderbilt in SEC play. Unless Phillips gets the Wildcats back in a bowl in 2012, Kentucky could be looking for a new coach in December. 

7. Jeff Quinn, Buffalo (5-19, 2 years)
Wins have been difficult to find at Buffalo, as the Bulls have only two winning records since 1996. Success has also eluded Quinn during his two years with Buffalo, as he has just three wins in MAC play. Another 2-10 or 3-9 season could spell the end of Quinn’s tenure with the Bulls, but there are reasons to believe Buffalo could be better in 2012. Running back Braden Oliver should be the MAC’s leading rusher and seven starters are back on defense. If Quinn can get Buffalo to four or five wins this year, he should be safe and easily move off this list for 2013. 

8. David Bailiff, Rice (23-38, 5 years)
Bailiff has experienced some high points during his career, but has mostly been a .500 or worse coach. He led Texas State to a 5-6 record in 2004 and followed that up with an 11-3 record in 2005. Despite a 5-6 mark with the Bobcats in 2006, he was hired to follow Todd Graham at Rice. Bailiff went 3-9 in his first year with the Owls, but posted an impressive 10-3 mark in 2008. However, the last three years have been mediocre, as Rice is just 10-26 during that span. Unless Bailiff shows progress, the Owls will likely have a new coach roaming the sidelines in 2012.

9. Curtis Johnson, Tulane (First Year)
With its last winning season in 2002, the Green Wave is desperately needs a shot of energy and someone who can rebuild Tulane into a consistent bowl team. Johnson brings some positives to Tulane, as he is a native of New Orleans and is regarded as a good recruiter. However, Johnson has never been a head coach or coordinator and his last stop in college was in 2005 with Miami. Just like Carl Pelini, it’s hard to judge anyone that has yet to coach a game. However, Johnson’s resume leaves a lot to be desired and plenty of doubts about whether he can rebuild Tulane.

10. Norm Chow, Hawaii (First Year)
Chow is a well-respected assistant, and is returning home to Hawaii as the Warriors make the jump from the WAC to the Mountain West. However, his offenses the last few years have been so-so, especially as his style and scheme did not mix with UCLA and Rick Neuheisel’s pistol attack. The biggest question surrounding Chow is why he is getting his first head coaching opportunity at age 65. Chow’s background makes him a perfect fit at Hawaii, but this being his first head coaching opportunity this late in his career is certainly troubling.

Ranking the Coaches: Top 25 Nationally
Ranking the Coaches: ACC
Ranking the Coaches: Big East
Ranking the Coaches: Pac-12
Ranking the Coaches: Big 12
Ranking the Coaches: Big Ten
Ranking the Coaches: SEC

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