College Football's Top 50 Wide Receivers of the BCS Era

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Who are the greatest wide receivers of the BCS Era?

<p> College Football's Top 50 Wide Receivers of the BCS Era</p>

Greatness is defined in so many different ways. Statistical production, individual awards, team success, longevity, supporting cast, level of competition, raw talent and athletic ability all factor heavily in determining overall greatness. Sometimes, you simply know greatness when you see it.

So all factors were considered when trying to determine who the greatest wide receivers of the BCS era have been. Here are the Top 50 wideouts since the BCS was implemented in 1998:

Agree or disagree with our ranking of College Football's Top 50 Wide Receivers of the BCS Era? Let us know on Twitter at @AthlonSports, using the hashtag #AthlonWR50.

1. Larry Fitzgerald, Pittsburgh (2002-03)
Stats: 161 rec., 2,677 yds, 34 TD

Few players have ever been as impossible to cover as the star from Richfield (Minn.) Holy Angels. After redshirting, Fitz dominated college football for two full seasons. He became the first Pitt Panther to have back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons, owns the school record with 34 touchdowns (in just 26 games) and owns the NCAA record for consecutive games with a touchdown reception (18). As a sophomore in his final season at Pitt, he caught 92 passes for 1,672 yards and 22 touchdowns, winning Big East Player of the Year honors and the Walter Camp and Biletnikoff awards. His second-place finish in the Heisman Trophy voting is the highest by any wide receiver during the BCS era and he is the only one in to finish in the top three.

2. Calvin Johnson, Georgia Tech (2004-06)
Stats: 178 rec., 2,927 yds, 28 TD, 40 rush, TD

Appropriately nicknamed Megatron, no player has combined the size and speed Johnson brought to the Ramblin Wreck offense. The Tyrone (Ga.) Sandy Creek prospect was the ACC Rookie of the Year in 2004 before earning back-to-back All-American honors in 2005-06. He owns school records for receiving yards and touchdowns during his time at Tech and claimed the Biletnikoff Award as well as ACC Player of the Year honors in 2006. He is one of 13 wide receivers to finish in the top 10 in the Heisman Trophy voting during the BCS era (10th). He is simply a freak of nature.

3. Michael Crabtree, Texas Tech (2007-08)
Stats: 231 rec., 3,127 yds, 41 TD

No player has been as productive in two seasons as the Dallas, Texas native. As a redshirt freshman, Crabtree set NCAA records for receptions (134), yards (1,962) and touchdowns (22) and won the Biletnikoff Award as the nation’s top wideout. He also won Big 12 Newcomer and Offensive Player of the Year honors. He became the first player in NCAA history to win a second Biletnikoff Award when he caught 97 passes for 1,165 yards and 19 touchdowns for the 11-2 Red Raiders the next year. He finished fifth in the Heisman balloting in ’08 — one of just four wide receivers to finish in the top five during the BCS era. Certainly, Mike Leach’s system inflated the two-time consensus All-American’s numbers, but the 6-foot-2, 215-pound wideout was — and still is — easily the most talented Texas Tech receiver in program history.

4. Peter Warrick, Florida State (1995-99)
Stats: 207 rec., 3,517 yds, 32 TD, 188 rush, 4 TD, 937 ret. yds (6)

The phrase all-purpose wasn’t en vogue when Warrick broke onto the scene so the Bradenton (Fla.) Southeast superstar might deserve credit for the invention. And if not for an incident at Dillard’s Department Store that resulted in a two-game suspension, Warrick likely would have won the Heisman Trophy. The two-time consensus All-American could do it all. His joystick, open-field moves made him dynamic in the passing game, special teams and he was one of the first wideouts used in the running game. His Sugar Bowl MVP performance — and touchdown catch — in the 1999 National Championship game (six rec., 163 yds, three total TDs) will go down as one of the greatest national title performances in NCAA history.

5. Percy Harvin, Florida (2006-08)
Stats: 133 rec., 1,929 yds, 13 TD, 1,852 rush, 19 TD

If Warrick invented the all-purpose position, Harvin glorified it. A true dual-threat offensive talent, Harvin burst onto the scene as the SEC Freshman of the Year. He played a key role in the 2006 BCS National Championship run, totaling 82 yards from scrimmage and a touchdown against Ohio State. He capped his college career with 14 touches for 171 yards from scrimmage and a touchdown in the 2008 BCS National Championship game against Oklahoma. Few have combined speed, strength, production and winning like Harvin did. He nearly topped 2,000 yards both rushing and receiving, and, if not for nagging injuries his entire career, the Virginia Beach prospect might have been more decorated nationally.

6. Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State (2009-11)
Stats: 252 rec., 3,564 yds, 40 TD, 136 rush, TD

Similarly to Crabtree, Blackmon’s numbers are inflated due to an elite offensive system. But make no mistake, he is the one of the greatest pass-catchers to ever play. He posted back-to-back seasons with at least 1,500 yards and 18 touchdowns, earning consensus All-American honors twice. The Ardmore (Okla.) Plainview product also became just the second player in NCAA history to claim two Biletnikoff Awards. Blackmon won Big 12 Offensive Player of the Year honors in 2010 and capped his illustrious career with a Big 12 championship and Fiesta Bowl MVP performance against Stanford. At a program with a long track record of elite wideouts, Blackmon has to be considered the best. He is one of just four wide receivers to finish in the top five for the Heisman Trophy (5th, 2010).

7. Braylon Edwards, Michigan (2001-04)
Stats: 252 rec., 3,541 yds, 39 TD

Not many players have three consecutive seasons with at least 1,000 yards and at least 10 touchdowns but that is what the Detroit native did at Michigan. He was uncoverable during his time at Ann Arbor, setting school records in every major receiving category. His 39 career touchdowns remain a Big Ten record. Edwards claimed Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year honors and claimed the Biletnikoff Award as a senior in 2004. The consensus All-American finished 10th in the Heisman voting that season as well.

8. Torry Holt, NC State (1995-98)
Stats: 191 rec., 3,379 yds, 31 TD, 119 rush

One of the greatest receivers to ever play the game on any level, Holt capped his outstanding Wolfpack career with an ACC Player of the Year award in the first year of the BCS. Over his final two seasons in Raleigh, the Gibsonville (N.C.) Eastern Guilford receiver caught 150 passes for 2,703 yards and 27 touchdowns (he also threw a 45-yard TD pass), finishing eighth in the Heisman voting in 1998. Holt set all types of NC State and ACC records during his college career and he went on to become one of the NFL’s greatest wide receivers.

9. Tavon Austin, West Virginia (2009-12)
Stats: 288 rec., 3,413 yds, 29 TD, 1,031 rush, 6 TD, 2,840 ret. yds, 5 TD

Be it through the air, on the ground or in the kicking game, Austin was downright unstoppable. The diminutive talent won’t ever be confused with prototypical physical outside receivers, but with the ball in his hands, few were as productive. The Baltimore prospect was a two-time All-American and two-time Big East Special Teamer of the Year. He posted back-to-back 100-catch/1,000-yard seasons and was a 1,000-yard rusher for his career. In fact, Austin’s signature performance came as a running back against Oklahoma as senior when he nearly set an NCAA record for all-purpose production with 572 yards (344 rushing, 82 receiving, 146 kick return). He scored four different ways during his unbelievable senior season and finished eighth in the Heisman voting.

10. Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma (2008-11)
Stats: 349 rec., 4,586 yds, 45 TD, 97 rush, TD, 1,307 ret. yds, 2 TD

No one in NCAA history caught more passes than the smallish local star from Norman, Okla. And it didn’t take long for him to become a star, catching seven passes for a freshman school record 141 yards in his first collegiate game. He posted three straight seasons of at least 80 catches, 1,100 yards and 10 touchdowns. He led the nation in both receptions (131) and punt returns (34) as a junior and is the Big 12’s all-time leading receiver in all three major categories. Broyles was a two-time consensus All-American.

Related: The Top 50 Quarterbacks of the BCS Era 

11. Troy Edwards, Louisiana Tech (1996-98)
Stats: 280 rec., 4,352 yds, 50 TD, 447 rush, 6 TD

From a stats perspective, no player during the BCS era was as productive as Edwards — and he did it prior to the spread offense explosion. At one time, Edwards owned the NCAA record for receptions (140), yards (1,996) and touchdowns (27) in a single season to go with NCAA single-game records for receptions (21) and yards (405). His 27 scores and 405 yards against Nebraska in 1998 are both still NCAA records. He was a consensus All-American and won the Biletnikoff Award that season.

12. Michael Floyd, Notre Dame (2008-11)
Stats: 271 rec., 3,686 yds, 37 TD, 30 rush, TD

The physical monster from famed Cretin-Derham Hall is the all-time leading receiver in Notre Dame history. He owns every major freshman, single-season and career benchmark in the Irish’s record book. If not for nagging injuries and a small off-the-field issue, Floyd’s numbers might be on par with the likes of Edwards or Broyles.

13. Mike Williams, USC (2002-03)
Stats: 176 rec., 2,579 yds, 30 TD

Fans in Los Angeles may always wonder what could have been had Williams not pressed NFL Draft eligibility rules. In his two underclass seasons for USC, Williams was extraordinary. As a true freshman, the massive 6-foot-5, 240-pounder caught 81 passes for 1,265 yards and 14 TDs. He returned to top those numbers as a sophomore with 95 receptions, 1,314 yards and 16 scores in 2003. He was a consensus All-American and finished eighth in the Heisman voting. Had the NFL allowed sophomores to enter the draft, he would have been a top-ten pick.

14. Roy Williams, Texas (2000-03)
Stats: 241 rec., 3,866 yds, 36 TD, 243 rush, 3 TD

Right out of the gate, Texas knew they had a great one in the massive 6-foot-3, 218-pound star from Odessa, Texas. He was a three-time All-Big 12 selection and left school with the records for receptions, yards and touchdowns. “The Legend” never caught fewer than seven touchdowns or 800 yards in any of his four NCAA seasons.

15. Marqise Lee, USC (2011-present)
Stats: 191 rec., 2,864 yds, 25 TD, 139 rush, 1,141 ret. yds, 2 TD

With one more year in school and one more season left in the current BCS structure, Lee is poised to become one of the era’s best. As just a sophomore, Lee has already won the Biletnikoff Award, been given consensus All-American honors, won the Pac-12 Player of the Year Award and broke multiple USC and Pac-12 receiving records. He is one of just two wideouts in BCS history to finish in the top four of the Heisman voting and should easily move into the top 10 on this list with another solid season in L.A.

16. Charles Rogers, Michigan State (2001-02)
Stats: 125 rec., 2,551 yds, 25 TD, 110 rush, TD

The in-state product from Saginaw played just two seasons for the Spartans but was an All-Big Ten performer both years. He posted back-to-back seasons with at least 1,200 yards and 12 touchdowns, earning consensus All-American and Biletnikoff honors in 2002. He set an NCAA record with 13 straight games with a TD catch (since broken) and owns just about every Michigan State receiving record.

17. AJ Green, Georgia (2008-10)
Stats: 166 rec., 2,619 yds, 23 TD, 105 rush

Based on raw talent alone, Green is the one of the greatest receivers to play the game. In a league not known for big passing numbers, Green led the SEC in yards and touchdowns as a true freshman. His rare blend of size, speed, vertical ability and red zone ball skills makes him one of the game’s most uncoverable targets.

18. Jeremy Maclin, Missouri (2007-08)
Stats: 182 rec., 2,315 yds, 22 TD, 668 rush, 6 TD, 2,626 ret. yds, 5 TD

He only played two seasons but was outstanding from the first time he stepped onto the college gridiron. He was a consensus All-American both years, topped 1,000 yards receiving in both years, scored at least 10 total touchdowns in both seasons and topped 1,000 return yards in both seasons. He set an NCAA freshman all-purpose yardage record with 2,776 total yards for a 12-2 Tigers team. He posted 5,609 all-purpose yards in just two seasons and might be the most underrated wideout of the BCS era.

19. Dwayne Jarrett, USC (2004-06)
Stats: 216 rec., 3,138 yds, 41 TD

A two-time consensus All-American, Jarrett was a touchdown machine. He scored 13, 16 and 12 receiving touchdowns respectively while helping USC reach  back-to-back BCS National Championship games. His 2005 campaign was his best — 91 rec., 1,274 yds, 16 TD — but he finished ninth in the Heisman voting as a junior in 2006 before turning pro. In the red zone, few players have ever been as dominant.

20. Golden Tate, Notre Dame (2007-09)
Stats: 157 rec., 2,707 yds, 26 TD, 227 rush, 3 TD, 1,196 ret. yds, TD

The all-purpose dynamo from Nashville, Tenn., was explosive all over the field for Notre Dame. After rarely playing as a freshman, Tate exploded onto the national scene as a junior. He won the Biletnikoff Award after 93 receptions, 1,496 yards, 15 touchdowns, 186 yards rushing, two more touchdowns and one punt return score. He finished 10th in the Heisman balloting in ’06 before leaving early for the NFL.

Related: The Top 50 Running Backs of the BCS Era

21. Troy Walters, Stanford (1996-99)
Stats: 245 rec., 3,995 yds, 26 TD

Walters had as complete a final season as any player on this list. He won Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, was a consensus All-American and won the Biletnikoff Award in 1999. The same year he helped Stanford win the league championship and play in the Rose Bowl. He is still the Pac-12's all-time leading receiver.

22. Jordan Shipley, Texas (2006-09)
Stats: 248 rec., 3,191 yds, 33 TD, 162 rush, 843 ret. yds, 4 TD

Colt McCoy’s go-to target made big plays in big games and was as dependable as any receiver in Big 12 history. He was a consensus All-American in 2009 when he caught 116 passes for 1,485 yards and scored 15 total touchdowns for an unbeaten Texas team that lost to Alabama in the national championship game.

23. Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State (2007-09)
Stats: 147 rec., 2,425 yds, 29 TD, 574 ret. yds, 3 TD

He may not have Blackmon’s numbers, but Bryant might be the most talented Pokes wideout of all-time. He was named an All-American after 87 receptions, 1,480 yards and 21 total touchdowns as just a sophomore. Had he not been suspended for most of the 2009 season, his numbers would’ve rivaled anyone’s on this list.

24. Rashuan Woods, Oklahoma State (2000-03)
Stats: 293 rec., 4,414 yds, 42 TD

Oklahoma State has one of the best wide receiver traditions in the nation and Woods was one of the first high-profile stars. Three seasons with at least 77 catches, 1,000 yards and 10 touchdowns makes him one of the most prolific receivers in BCS history. And his NCAA-record seven touchdowns against SMU still stands.

25. Josh Reed, LSU (1999-2001)
Stats: 167 rec., 3,001 yds, 17 TD, 63 rush, TD

The numbers weren’t huge for Reed, but he was the nation’s best in 2001. He was a consensus All-American and Biletnikoff Award winner after catching 94 passes for 1,740 yards and seven touchdowns. He is one of the SEC’s greatest wide receivers and is the conference’s only Biletnikoff winner.

26. Julio Jones, Alabama (2008-10)
Stats: 179 rec., 2,653 yds, 15 TD, 139 rush 2 TD

From a talent standpoint, there may not be a more gifted name on this list than the superstar from Alabama. The school’s most talented pass-catcher helped lead Alabama to a national championship in 2009 and played on three teams that went 36-5 overall.

27. Antonio Bryant, Pittsburgh (1999-2001)
Stats: 161 rec., 2,805 yds, 26 TD

Two average years sandwiched around one spectacular season made Bryant one of the best offensive weapons in the nation. He won the Biletnikoff Award and Big East Player of the Year honors in 2000 when caught 68 passes for 1,302 yards and 11 scores. At one point, he scored in 13 straight games.

28. Mike Hass, Oregon State (2003-05)
Stats: 220 rec., 3,924 yds, 20 TD

He may not be the most talented wideout to play during this era but Hass is one of the best. He was the first Pac-10 receiver in history to post three consecutive 1,000-yard seasons and left school with the best single game in league history with 293 yards against Boise State in 2004. He won the Biletnikoff Award in 2005 as the nation’s best wide receiver.

29. Lee Evans, Wisconsin (1999-2003)
Stats: 172 rec., 3,382 yds, 26 TD

Despite missing extended time with a torn ACL, Evans is the best wide receiver to play at Wisconsin since Al Toon. His two-year run was as good as any in Big Ten history, posting a league record 1,545 yards in 2001. He came back after the knee injury and nearly duplicated his numbers with 1,213 yards and 13 TDs in 2003. His 10-catch, 258-yard, 5-TD game against Michigan State might have been the best single performance by any Badger.

30. Robert Woods, USC (2010-12)
Stats: 250 rec., 2,933 yds, 32 TD, 142 rush, 1,547 ret. yds, TD

Lee gets all the national hype as far as USC receivers go, but don't forget those school and conference records he set were mostly owned by Woods. His 111-catch, 1,292-yard campaign in 2011 is one of the best seasons for a Pac-12 receiver in history. He, also like Lee, was a dynamic return man as well.

31. Santana Moss, Miami (1997-2000)
Stats: 143 rec., 2,547 yds, 19 TD, 277 rush, 3 TD, 655 ret. yds, 4 TD (7)

Much like Warrick, Moss was an all-purpose dynamo well ahead of his time. He could do everything as his overall statistical production indicated. He was the ACC Offensive Player of the Year and a consensus All-American in 2000 with this versatile stat line: 45 rec., 748 yds, 5 TDs, 201 rush, 2 TDs, 655 punt return yards, 4 TDs. 

32. David Boston, Ohio State (1996-98)
Stats: 191 rec., 2,855 yds, 34 TD

Suspicions of performance enhancers will always hang around Boston's resume so it is difficult to evaluate where he ranks. While on the field at Ohio State, he was dominant. He caught 27 touchdowns over his last two seasons and was the superstar — 85 rec., 1,435 yds, 13 TD — for the '98 team that likely should have played Tennessee for a National Championship.

33. DeSean Jackson, Cal (2005-07)
Stats: 162 rec., 2,423 yds, 22 TD, 199 rush, TD, 671 ret. yds, 6 TD

Knucklehead behavior aside, Jackson was a big-play waiting to happen throughout his college career. It was his All-American sophomore season that wowed the nation, however. He caught 59 passes for 1,060 yards and nine scores but delivered on special teams in a big way. He scored on four of his 25 punt returns and averaged over 18 yards per return. He missed time with an injury and off-the-field issues as a junior or he might have been higher on this list.

34. Roddy White, UAB (2001-04)
Stats: 163 rec., 3,112 yds, 26 TD

The career numbers aren't huge and the level of competition was suspect, however, White was an elite big-play machine well before he got to Atlanta. He led the nation in receiving as a senior (1,452 yds) and averaged 19.1 yards per catch for his career. His overall NFL talent makes him arguably the most gifted "mid-major" receiver of the era.

35. Reggie Williams, Washington (2001-03)
Stats: 238 rec., 3,536 yds, 22 TD

Similar to his Williams counterpart at Texas, Reggie Williams was one of the first massive outside physical targets. He posted 183 catches, 2,563 yards and 19 touchdowns over his last two seasons, including a consensus All-American sophomore year in 2002.
 
36. Greg Jennings, Western Michigan (2002-05)
Stats: 238 rec., 3,539 yds, 39 TD, 1,462 ret. yds, 2 TD

White is the most talented "mid-major" wide receiver of this era but Jennings is a close No. 2. The 2005 MAC Offensive Player of the Year caught at least 11 touchdowns and topped 1,000 yards receiving for three consecutive seasons. He led the nation with 98 receptions in '05 and was also an explosive return man as well.

37. Mark Clayton, Oklahoma (2001-04)
Stats: 220 rec., 3,236 yds, 31 TD, 221 ret. yds, TD

Jason White's No. 1 target helped Oklahoma play in two national championship games. The Sooners had many elite wideouts but Clayton might have been the most dynamic (possibly, more so than Broyles even). His unstoppable junior season gets him onto this list alone: 83 rec., 1,425 yds, 15 TD.

38. Kendall Wright, Baylor (2008-11)
Stats: 308 rec., 4,004 yds, 30 TD, 425 rush, 2 TD

There are just 15 receivers with 4,000 yards in their college careers and there are just 10 wideouts with at least 300 catches. There are just three such players with both (Ryan Broyles, Jordan White). Wright's offensive system certainly helped but he was as versatile, dependable and explosive as any player during this era.

39. Reggie Wayne, Miami (1997-2000)
Stats: 173 rec., 2,510 yds, 20 TD

Based on sheer talent alone, Wayne is one of the greatest wide receivers to play the game. His college stats aren't gaudy — mostly because he shared the ball with Santana Moss, Clinton Portis and Edgerrin James — but consistent production at Miami was merely a glimpse of his elite overall ability.

40. Dwayne Bowe, LSU (2003-06)
Stats: 154 rec., 2,403 yds, 26 TD

Much like White or Wayne, Bowe's raw talent makes him one of the greatest of his generation. He played sparingly on the '03 championship team but was a scoring machine the rest of his career — catching all 26 touchdowns in three SEC seasons.

41. James Rodgers, Oregon State (2007-11) 
Stats: 222 rec., 2,578 yds, 19 TD, 1,410 rush, 9 TD, 2,385 ret. yds, 2 TD  

42. Terrence Edwards, Georgia (1999-2002)
Stats: 204 rec., 3,093 yds, 30 TD, 285 ret. yds

43. Wes Welker, Texas Tech (2000-03)
Stats: 259 rec., 3,069 yds, 21 TD, 562 rush, 2 TD, 2,102 ret. yds, 8 TD

44. Jarett Dillard, Rice (2005-08)
Stats: 292 rec., 4,138 yds, 60 TD

45. Plaxico Burress, Michigan State (1998-99)
Stats: 131 rec., 2,155 yds, 20 TD

46. Antonio Brown, Central Michigan (2007-09) 
Stats: 305 rec., 3,199 yds, 22 TD, 531 rush, 4 TD, 3,434 ret. yds, 5 TD

47. T.Y. Hilton, FIU (2008-11)
Stats: 229 rec., 3,531 yds, 24 TD, 498 rush, 7 TD, 3,469 ret. yds, 6 TD

48. Mardy Gilyard, Cincinnati (2008-09)
Stats: 168 rec., 2,467 yds, 22 TD, 26 rush, TD, 2,477 ret. yds, 5 TD

49. Terrance Williams, Baylor (2009-12)
Stats: 201 rec., 3,294 yds, 27 TD, 979 ret. yds

50. Trevor Insley, Nevada (1996-99)
Stats: 298 rec., 5,005 yds, 35 TD

The Next 50:

51. Mohamed Sanu, Rutgers (2009-11): 210 rec., 2,263 yds, 12 TD, 653 rush, 9 TD, 207 pass, 4 TD
52. Jordy Nelson, Kansas State (2005-07): 206 rec., 2,822 yds, 20 TD, 267 ret. yds, 3 TD 
53. Eric Page, Toledo (2009-11): 306 rec., 3,446 yds, 25 TD, 52 rush, TD, 2,549 ret. yds, 5 TD
54. Sidney Rice, South Carolina (2005-06): 142 rec., 2,233 yds, 23 TD 
55. Jerricho Cotchery, NC State (2000-03): 200 rec., 3,119 yds, 21 TD, 102 rush, TD, 300 ret. yds, TD 
56. Michael Thomas, Arizona (2005-08): 259 rec., 3,231 yds, 22 TD, 395 rush, 3 TD, 1,354 yds, 2 TD
57. Derek Hagan, Arizona State (2002-05): 258 rec., 3,939 yds, 27 TD 
58. Jabar Gaffney, Florida (2000-01): 138 rec., 2,375 yds, 27 TD 
59. Jeff Samardzija, Notre Dame (2003-06): 179 rec., 2,593 yds, 27 TD, 19 rush, TD 
60. Andre Johnson, Miami (2000-02): 92 rec., 1,831 yds, 20 TD, 594 ret. yds

61. Davone Bess, Hawaii (2005-07): 293 rec., 3,610 yds, 41 TD
62. D’Wayne Bates, Northwestern (1995-98): 210 rec., 3,370 yds, 26 TD
63. Earl Bennett, Vanderbilt (2005-07): 236 rec., 2,852 yds, 20 TD, 586 ret. yds
64. Stedman Bailey, West Virginia (2010-12): 210 rec., 3,218 yds, 41 TD
65. Austin Collie, BYU (2004-08): 215 rec., 3,255 yds, 30 TD, 1,288 ret. yds
66. Vincent Marshall, Houston (2003-06): 272 rec., 3,770 yds, 26 TD, 299 rush, 2 TD, 693 ret. yds, TD
67. Sammy Watkins, Clemson (2011-present ): 139 rec., 1,927 yds, 15 TD, 331 rush, TD, 1,106 ret. yds, TD
68. Keenan Allen, Cal (2010-12): 205 rec., 2,570 yds, 17 TD, 230 rush, 2 TD, 658 ret. yds, TD
69. DeAndre Hopkins, Clemson (2010-12): 206 rec., 3,020 yds, 27 TD
70. Aaron Kelly, Clemson (2005-08): 232 rec., 2,733 yds, 20 TD, 417 ret. yds

71. Dwayne Harris, East Carolina (2007-10): 268 rec., 3,001 yds, 20 TD, 526 rush, 6 TD, 2,855 ret. yds, 3 TD
72. Eric Decker, Minnesota (2006-09): 227 rec., 3,119 yds, 24 TD, 114 rush, TD
73. Dennis Northcutt, Arizona (1996-99): 217 rec., 3,186 yds, 24 TD, 382 rush, 2 TD
74. Titus Young, Boise State (2007-10): 204 rec., 3,063 yds, 25 TD, 350 rush, 8 TD, 1,525 ret. yds, 2 TD
75. Dezmon Briscoe, Kansas (2007-09): 219 rec., 3,240 yds, 31 TD, 37 rush, TD, 651 ret. yds, TD
76. Robert Meachem, Tennessee (2004-06): 125 rec., 2,140 yds, 17 TD
77. Ron Johnson, Minnesota (1998-2001): 196 rec., 2,931 yds, 31 TD
78. Dorien Bryant, Purdue (2004-07): 292 rec., 3,548 yds, 21 TD, 421 rush, 6 TD, 2,250 ret. yds, 3 TD
79. D.J. Hall, Alabama (2004-07): 194 rec., 2,923 yds, 17 TD
80. Darius Watts, Marshall (2000-03): 272 rec., 4,031 yds, 47 TD, 188 rush, 254 ret. yds

81. Jason Hill, Washington State (2003-06): 148 rec., 2,704 yds, 32 TD
82. Geoff McArthur, Cal (2000-04): 202 rec., 3,188 yds, 20 TD
83. Freddie Mitchell, UCLA (1998-2000): 110 rec., 1,955 yds, 9 TD
84. Patrick Edwards, Houston (2008-11): 291 rec., 4,507 yds, 43 TD, 947 ret. yds, 2 TD 
85. Shaun McDonald, Arizona State (2000-02): 152 rec., 2,806 yds, 24 TD, 54 rush, TD, 389 ret. yds, TD 
86. James Hardy, Indiana (2005-07): 191 rec., 2,740 yds, 36 TD 
87. Michael Clayton, LSU (2001-03): 182 rec., 2,582 yds, 21 TD 
88. Kenny McKinley, South Carolina (2005-08): 207 rec., 2,781 yds, 19 TD
89. Taylor Stubblefield, Purdue (2001-04): 316 rec., 3,433 yds, 19 TD 
90. Marvin McNutt, Iowa (2008-11): 170 rec., 2,861 yds, 28 TD 

91. Craig Yeast, Kentucky (1995-98): 208 rec., 2,899 yds, 28 TD, 125 rush
92. John Standeford, Purdue (2000-03): 249 rec., 3,618 yds, 27 TD
93. Steve Smith, USC (2003-06): 190 rec., 3,019 yds, 22 TD
94. Todd Blythe, Iowa State (2004-07): 176 rec., 3,096 yds, 31 TD 
95. Conner Vernon, Duke (2009-12): 283 rec., 3,749 yds, 21 TD, 570 ret. yds 
96. Ryan Swope, Texas A&M (2009-12): 252 rec., 3,117 yds, 24 TD 
97. Kenny Britt, Rutgers (2006-08): 178 rec., 3,043 yds, 17 TD, 75 rush, TD
98. Arnold Jackson, Louisville (1997-2000): 300 rec., 3,670 yds, 31 TD 
99. Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt (2010-present ): 149 rec., 2,283 yds, 17 TD, 61 rush, TD 
100. Jordan White, Western Michigan (2007-11): 306  rec., 4,187 yds, 32 TD, 462 ret. yds

Top 50s of the BCS Era:

The Top 50 Quarterbacks of the BCS Era
The Top 50 Running Backs of the BCS Era


Agree or disagree with our ranking of College Football's Top 50 Wide Receivers of the BCS Era? Let us know on Twitter (@AthlonSports), using the hashtag #AthlonWR50

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