Grading College Football's First-Year Coaching Hires for 2013

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Kliff Kingsbury is one of the top new hires from 2013.

Grading College Football's First-Year Coaching Hires for 2013

With college football’s 2013 season completed, it’s time to take a look back at the season that was amd review the performance of all 125 teams before 2014 kicks off.

 

College football’s coach carousel was quite active last offseason, featuring 31 changes among BCS programs. The changes in 2014 are not expected to reach that number, so we may not see another year with 31 teams changing coaches for a while.

Auburn’s Gus Malzahn easily takes the top spot in our first-year coaching hires from 2013. The Tigers were one of the most-improved teams in the nation and nearly claimed their second national title in the BCS era. Malzahn’s offense once again gave opposing SEC defenses fits, and Auburn should be back in the national title mix in 2014.

After Malzahn, Utah State’s Matt Wells, Wisconsin’s Gary Andersen, Boston College’s Steve Addazio and Texas Tech’s Kliff Kingsbury round out the top coaching hires from 2013.
 

Ranking the Performance of College Football's New Coaches from 2013

1. Gus Malzahn, Auburn
Before: 3-9 (0-8) After: 12-2 (7-1)

Malzahn’s debut at Auburn might be one of the best first-year coaching jobs of the BCS era. The Tigers struggled mightily last season, losing all eight conference games and finishing with their worst record since a 3-8 mark in Terry Bowden’s final year in 1998. But Auburn rebounded quickly under Malzahn, who had a solid grasp of the team’s roster due to a stint as offensive coordinator under Gene Chizik from 2009-11. The Tigers suffered an early season loss to LSU (35-21) but finished the regular season on a nine-game winning streak. During this streak, Auburn made two of the most memorable plays of the 2013 season, with Chris Davis returning a missed field goal to beat Alabama and quarterback Nick Marshall connecting with Ricardo Louis on an unlikely 73-yard touchdown pass to beat Georgia. The Tigers fell just short of winning the national championship, but the foundation is strong for this team to contend once again in 2014. Another credit to Malzahn’s ability to coach was the development of Marshall, who was a Georgia defensive back in 2011 and played only one season at quarterback on the junior college level.
Final Grade: A+


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2. Matt Wells, Utah State
Before: 11-2 (6-0) After: 9-5 (7-1)

Wells inherited 14 returning starters off a team that won 11 games in 2012, so it was no surprise Utah State won at least seven games for the third consecutive season. But winning nine games in 2013 is quite an accomplishment for Wells, especially after starting quarterback Chuckie Keeton was lost for the year with a torn ACL in early October. With Keeton sidelined, Utah State turned to a true freshman quarterback in Darell Garretson and a defense ranked as the best in the Mountain West. Of the Aggies' five losses, three were by a touchdown or less, including games to Utah, USC and Fresno State. Utah State also capped its season with a bowl victory over Northern Illinois. Wells kept the Aggies on track despite a key injury and led Utah State to an appearance in the first Mountain West Championship Game. Despite the two-game regression in wins, 2013 was a very successful year for Wells. But now comes the big question. As Utah State is further removed from Gary Andersen, can Wells keep the program performing at a high level?
Final Grade: A

3. Gary Andersen, Wisconsin
Before: 8-6 (4-4) After: 9-4 (6-2)

Much like his successor at Utah State, Andersen inherited plenty of talent in his first year with the Badgers. Wisconsin returned 11 starters, including one of the best backfields in the nation in running backs Melvin Gordon and James White. The Badgers lost two of their first five games, but one of those defeats was by seven to Ohio State, and the other was a 32-30 loss at Arizona State, which featured some questionable officiating at the end. A late-season loss to Penn State ended any shot Wisconsin had of playing in a BCS bowl, and the Badgers dropped a 34-24 matchup to South Carolina in the Capital One Bowl. Overall, 2013 was another solid year for Wisconsin, which has been a model of consistency recently with 12 consecutive winning seasons. Andersen’s top priority in 2014 will be to upgrade the passing game, along with replenish a defense that loses a handful of key players in the front seven.
Final Grade: A-

4. Steve Addazio, Boston College
Before: 2-10 (1-7) After: 7-6 (4-4)

Expectations were low at Boston College heading into the 2013 season. The Eagles finished 6-18 in the final two years under former coach Frank Spaziani and were picked last in the Atlantic Division at ACC media days. But Addazio pushed all of the right buttons this season. Boston College made a bowl game for the first time since 2010, and the Eagles finished out of the cellar in the Atlantic. All six of Addazio’s losses came against bowl teams, including national champion Florida State, Orange Bowl champ Clemson and a solid USC team. The Eagles gave the Seminoles all it could handle, losing only by 14 (48-34) in late September. Boston College finished the year by losing its last two games. However, that shouldn’t put a damper on Addazio’s first season, especially with a solid recruiting class on the way. With running back Andre Williams, quarterback Chase Rettig and receiver Alex Amidon moving on next year, the Eagles may take a step back in the win column. But with Addazio on the sidelines, Boston College is well-positioned for the future.
Final Grade: A-

5. Kliff Kingsbury, Texas Tech
Before: 8-5 (4-5) After: 8-5 (4-5)

Kingsbury’s first season in Lubbock didn’t result in a different record than his predecessor Tommy Tuberville had in 2012. However, there’s a different feeling surrounding the program, as Texas Tech is trending in the right direction going into 2014. A soft schedule helped the Red Raiders start 7-0, but the second half of the season featured a tougher slate, and Kingsbury’s team ended with a 7-5 mark. Despite losing its final five games, Texas Tech lost to Oklahoma by only eight points and finished the year with a convincing 37-23 victory over Arizona State in the Holiday Bowl. Although momentum is tough to carry from the end of one season to the start of another, the Red Raiders benefitted from the extra bowl practices and should be picked among the top 35 teams next season.
Final Grade: B+

6. Mark Helfrich, Oregon
Before: 12-1 (8-1) After: 11-2 (7-2)

Oregon was pegged by most as a national title contender in the preseason. The Ducks started 8-0, but lost two out of their next three games, including a costly 26-20 defeat at Stanford. A knee injury to quarterback Marcus Mariota hampered the offense late in the year and pushed Oregon out of contention for the Pac-12 title. Helfrich had a tough job in 2013, as expectations were high and Chip Kelly was not an easy coach to replace. Despite the two losses, the Ducks won at least 10 games for the sixth consecutive season and extended their bowl winning streak to three. Helfrich has a busy offseason ahead, as he has to find a replacement for defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti, as well as close on a likely top-15 recruiting class. With most of Oregon’s core returning next year, Helfrich will have a chance to get the Ducks back into the national title mix.
Final Grade: B+

7. Tommy Tuberville, Cincinnati
Before: 10-3 (5-2) After: 9-4 (6-2)

With the recent defections in the American Athletic Conference, Cincinnati has a chance to emerge as one of the top programs from the “Group of Five.” Three coaches – Brian Kelly, Butch Jones and Tuberville – have guided the Bearcats to at least nine wins since 2007. Tuberville was a surprising hire at Cincinnati, but he kept the program on track with a third-place finish in the American Athletic. The Bearcats were soundly defeated by Illinois 45-17 in the second week of the season, but this team was close to finishing conference play with an unbeaten mark. Losses to Louisville and South Florida came by a touchdown or less. Cincinnati lost its bowl game 39-17 to North Carolina, but Tuberville seems to have this program on solid footing. Don’t be surprised if the Bearcats are picked to win the American Athletic Conference in 2014.
Final Grade: B+

8. Rod Carey, Northern Illinois
Before: 12-2 (8-0) After: 12-2 (8-0)

Carey’s first full season on the sidelines in DeKalb nearly resulted in another BCS bowl for Northern Illinois. The Huskies cruised to a 12-0 mark in the regular season, which included wins over two BCS opponents (Iowa and Purdue). But Northern Illinois ended the year with a disappointing loss to Bowling Green (47-27), which cost the program a chance to play in a BCS bowl. Perhaps some of that disappointment carried over into the Poinsettia Bowl, where the Huskies were defeated by Utah State 21-14. Despite the losses to Bowling Green and Utah State, Northern Illinois won at least 11 games for the fourth consecutive season. Carey will have a tough assignment next year, as quarterback Jordan Lynch and standout safety Jimmie Ward depart. But the Huskies are set to bring in one of the MAC’s top recruiting classes, and there’s enough talent to win the West Division once again in 2014.
Final Grade: B+

9. Scott Shafer, Syracuse
Before: 8-5 (5-2) After: 7-6 (4-4)

Admittedly, we were slightly skeptical of Shafer this preseason. After all, this was his first head coaching gig, and the Orange lost several key pieces from last season’s 8-5 team. However, Shafer did a remarkable job of getting Syracuse back to the postseason. Syracuse started 0-2, suffered a 56-0 loss to Georgia Tech as well as a 59-3 whipping at the hands of Florida State. But the Orange never collapsed, finishing the season with a thrilling 34-31 win over Boston College to earn bowl eligibility. And Syracuse used the bowl practices to their advantage, as quarterback Terrel Hunt was clearly an improved player in the 21-17 win over Minnesota in the Texas Bowl.
Final Grade: B+

10. Mike MacIntyre, Colorado
Before: 1-11 (1-8) After: 4-8 (1-8)

MacIntyre walked into a difficult situation at Colorado, a program that has not had a winning season since 2005, and there were concerns about facility improvements if the Buffaloes wanted to win in the Pac-12. Coming off a 1-11 record and a roster that was not stocked with overwhelming talent, MacIntyre did a solid job just getting Colorado to four wins. Sure, three of those came in non-conference action, but the Buffaloes were more competitive in Pac-12 action. MacIntyre appears to have found his quarterback of the future in Sefo Liufau, and most of the starting lineup will return in 2014. After a bad two-year stint under former coach Jon Embree, Colorado is headed in the right direction under MacIntyre.
Final Grade: B+

11. Bobby Petrino, Western Kentucky
Before: 7-6 (4-4) After: 8-4 (4-3)

Given how his Arkansas tenure ended, Petrino was a risky hire for Western Kentucky. But the move was worth the risk for the Hilltoppers, as Petrino – before his motorcycle incident – was regarded as one of the top coaches in the nation. Petrino was solid in his first (and only) year at Western Kentucky, guiding the Hilltoppers to a win over Kentucky in the season opener and four wins in conference play. Two of Western Kentucky’s losses (South Alabama and Troy) were by seven points or less. Petrino couldn’t get the Hilltoppers to a bowl game. However, Western Kentucky has won at least seven games in three consecutive years. Not bad for a program that started on the FBS level in 2009.
Final Grade: B

12. Bryan Harsin, Arkansas State
Before: 10-3 (7-1) After: 8-5 (5-2, Harsin did not coach the bowl game)

When the 2013 season kicked off, Harsin became the fourth head coach at Arkansas State in four years. But his stay in Jonesboro was short, as Harsin left in December to take over at Boise State. He did not coach in the GoDaddy Bowl, but Harsin guided Arkansas State to a 7-5 mark in the regular season, with losses coming against Auburn, Memphis, Missouri, Louisiana-Lafayette and Western Kentucky. Despite losing quarterback Ryan Aplin after the 2012 season, the Red Wolves still managed to average 29.2 points a game in 2013. Considering the lack of stability at head coach for the Red Wolves, it’s a testament to where this program is that they were able to win 28 games over the last three years. Harsin was a good hire, but Arkansas State needs new coach Blake Anderson to stick around for a few years. Change at a program is fine. However, five head coaches in five seasons is simply too much turnover.
Final Grade: B

13. Butch Jones, Tennessee
Before: 5-7 (1-7) After: 5-7 (2-6)

Tennessee was once one of the premier programs in the SEC East. However, the Volunteers have fallen on hard times recently, recording five losing seasons over the last six years. Given the recent lack of success in Knoxville, it’s hard to fault Jones on winning five games in his first season. Tennessee did show improvement in the SEC, beating South Carolina 23-21 and losing to Georgia and Vanderbilt by a combined seven points. Jones is putting together a top-five recruiting class, and the future in Knoxville looks bright. Tennessee took a few baby steps in the right direction in 2013. Now the next step for Jones is to get the Volunteers back in a bowl next year.
Final Grade: B

14. Matt Rhule, Temple
Before: 4-7 (2-5) After: 2-10 (1-7)

The final ledger on Rhule’s first season at Temple records only two wins. But the Owls played significantly better in the second half of 2013, losing their last four games by 10 points or less, including a three-point defeat to Fiesta Bowl champion UCF. Overall, Temple lost seven games by 10 points or less and avoided the cellar in the American Athletic Conference with a victory over Memphis in the season finale. Considering the close losses, along with the emergence of quarterback P.J. Walker in the second half of the season, Rhule’s first season at Temple doesn’t look as bad as the record might indicate.
Final Grade: C+

15. Trent Miles, Georgia State
Before: 1-10 (1-7) After: 0-12 (0-7)

Does it look strange to have a coach ranked this high that did not win a game in 2013? Sure. But let’s consider the circumstances Miles inherited. Georgia State finished 1-10 on the FCS level last season, and this program has only played football for four years. The Panthers were on the verge of a couple of wins, losing to Troy, Texas State and Arkansas State by a touchdown or less. Miles worked wonders at Indiana State on the FCS level prior to coming to Georgia State. Considering the improvement by the Panthers throughout the year and the close calls in their first season on the FBS level, Miles’ first season at Georgia State was better than the record shows.
Final Grade: C+

16. Mark Stoops, Kentucky
Before: 2-10 (0-8) After: 2-10 (0-8)

Coming off a 2-10 record with a difficult schedule ahead in 2013, Kentucky was expected to struggle this fall. The Wildcats won only two games (Miami, Ohio and Alabama State) and failed to record a SEC victory for the second year in a row. But there was progress on the field, as Kentucky lost to South Carolina by seven points and Mississippi State by six. Moral victories won’t get it done in the SEC. However, Stoops has the Wildcats trending in the right direction. The program is making much-needed facility improvements, and Stoops is expected to bring in a top-25 recruiting class. Kentucky may not make a bowl in 2014, but all signs point to the program being in good hands with Stoops at the helm.
Final Grade: C+

17. Ron Caragher, San Jose State
Before: 11-2 (5-1) After: 6-6 (5-3)

Caragher did a nice job getting San Jose State back to at least six wins, which is the program’s first back-to-back non-losing seasons since 1991-92. However, despite returning quarterback David Fales and one of the Mountain West’s top receiving corps, the Spartans regressed by five wins and missed out on a bowl. Caragher will have a tough job ahead next season, as San Jose State has to replace Fales and will lose defensive stalwarts in cornerback Bene Benwikere and linebacker Keith Smith.
Final Grade: C

18. Bret Bielema, Arkansas
Before: 4-8 (2-6) After: 3-9 (0-8)

Bielema wasn’t afraid to mix things up in his first season in the SEC, but results were tough to come by for Arkansas. Contributing to the lack of success on the field was a brutal SEC West, along with just three returning starters on offense. As expected, there were growing pains at quarterback and on the offensive line. However, Bielema’s recruiting paid off, as running back Alex Collins, tight end Hunter Henry and offensive linemen Dan Skipper and Denver Kirkland are building blocks for the offense. The Razorbacks opened 3-0 but blew a 24-7 lead against Rutgers in their final non-conference game. SEC play was tough on a young Arkansas team, but there were a few close calls for Bielema, including an overtime loss to Mississippi State and a four-point defeat to LSU. Despite a 3-9 mark, Bielema’s team never quit and nearly pulled off a huge win in Death Valley. That’s a good sign going forward for Arkansas.
Final Grade: C

19. Willie Taggart, South Florida
Before: 3-9 (1-6) After: 2-10 (2-6)

We had Taggart pegged as one of the top hires from last year’s coaching carousel, but the Bulls’ first-year coach finished with a disappointing 2-10 mark. Of course, it’s hard to fault Taggart for everything that went wrong. Former coach Skip Holtz didn’t leave much to work with, and South Florida was especially short on offensive playmakers. Freshman quarterback Mike White showed signs of promise late in the year, and Andre Davis could be one of the top receivers in the American Athletic Conference in 2014. While wins were hard to come by, the Bulls played better at the end of the year. USF lost to UCF by three points and dropped a 35-23 game at Houston in late October. There’s only one fix for Taggart’s roster issues: recruiting. In early January, South Florida was regarded as having the top recruiting class in the American Athletic Conference. Better days are ahead for the Bulls.
Final Grade: C

20. Paul Haynes, Kent State
Before: 11-3 (8-0) After: 4-8 (3-5)

Kent State was just one win away from a BCS bowl last year. The Golden Flashes were +20 in turnover margin and won a handful of close games in 2013, so some regression in the win department was expected. However, Kent State surprisingly fell to 4-8 and out of the bowl picture. The Golden Flashes rallied to win their last two games, but 2013 was an underachieving season considering 10 starters were back, including all-purpose threat Dri Archer. Considering Kent State won its last two games, Haynes managed to end a disappointing season with some positive momentum.
Final Grade: C-

21. Dave Doeren, NC State
Before: 7-6 (4-4) After: 3-9 (0-8)

NC State entered 2013 by earning bowl trips in three consecutive seasons, and with a favorable schedule, another postseason game was a reasonable expectation. However, the Wolfpack backtracked in 2013, largely due to inconsistency at the quarterback spot. NC State finished the year on an eight-game losing streak and winless in conference play for the first time since 1959. While 2013 was largely a forgettable year for Doeren and his staff, the Wolfpack did land transfer quarterback Jacoby Brissett for 2014, and their recruiting class is ranked No. 7 in the ACC. NC State also has some other promising young talent returning next year, including running back Matt Dayes and defensive tackle Monty Nelson. It may take another year, but Doeren seems to be establishing a solid foundation in Raleigh, and Brissett should help jumpstart the offense next year.
Final Grade: C-

22. Brian Polian, Nevada
Before: 7-6 (4-4) After: 4-8 (3-5)

Polian had a tough assignment in his first year in Reno, as replacing coaching legend Chris Ault was no easy task. The Wolf Pack also played a brutal non-conference schedule, including road trips to UCLA and Florida State, which left little margin for error to get to a bowl. Nevada lost three games by a touchdown or less, but two of the Wolf Pack’s Mountain West victories came against Air Force and Hawaii, arguably the two worst teams in the conference. The non-conference schedule won’t get any easier next season, but Nevada will have a healthy Cody Fajardo at quarterback, which could be the difference between a winning record and another offseason at home.
Final Grade: C-

23. Skip Holtz, Louisiana Tech
Before: 9-3 (4-2) After: 4-8 (3-5)

With only five returning starters in 2013, the Bulldogs were expected to take a step back in the win column. Additionally, coaching transition is never easy, so Louisiana Tech had its hands full going into this season. Holtz had success at Connecticut and East Carolina but was fired at South Florida after a 16-21 mark in three years. The Bulldogs struggled in their first season in Conference USA, winning just four games and finishing the year on a three-game losing streak. Louisiana Tech’s four victories weren’t exactly against the best competition, with one coming against FCS opponent Lamar and the other three (FIU, Southern Miss and UTEP) versus teams who finished a combined 4-32. While expectations were low and transition was high in Ruston, Conference USA was not as strong as it has been in recent years. And the Bulldogs were pounded 30-10 by UTSA, a team playing just its third season of football. As his past history shows, Holtz is a capable coach. But why did things not work out at USF? Holtz had plenty of new faces stepping into key roles in 2013, but there was enough talent to expect a bowl. Holtz has plenty to prove in 2014.
Final Grade: D

24. Sonny Dykes, California
Before: 3-9 (2-7) After: 1-11 (0-9)

Dykes inherited a talented roster, but injuries and a challenging schedule prevented California from building any momentum in 2013. The Golden Bears’ only victory came against FCS opponent Portland State, while non-conference games against Ohio State and Northwestern were too much for a young, rebuilding team. Pac-12 play wasn’t kind to California either, as the Golden Bears had only one loss by 10 points or less. While injuries and a freshman quarterback are to blame for the one-win season, the defense was simply horrendous. The Golden Bears allowed 529.6 yards per game and opponents averaged a whopping 7.1 yards per play. Coordinator Andy Buh was demoted, and assistants Randy Stewart and Barry Sacks were fired in early January. California has talent and Dykes proved he can coach at Louisiana Tech. Improvement should be on the way for the Golden Bears in 2014, but it’s probably too much to ask this team to finish above .500.
Final Grade: D

25. Darrell Hazell, Purdue
Before: 6-7 (3-5) After: 1-11 (0-8)
After leading Kent State to 11 wins in 2012, Hazell was one of the top names in the coaching carousel last offseason. Purdue and Hazell seemed like a good fit, but the first year was a struggle. The Boilermakers’ only win was a six-point victory over Indiana State and just one Big Ten defeat was by fewer than 14 points. Despite the struggles in 2013, there is reason for optimism. Hazell’s first year at Kent State resulted in a 5-7 mark, but the Golden Flashes improved by six wins the next year. Purdue probably won’t make that big of a leap in 2014. However, quarterback Danny Etling gained valuable experience in 2013, and running back Akeem Hunt and receiver DeAngelo Yancy return next season. The defense suffers a few key losses, including cornerback Ricardo Allen and end Bruce Gaston. The Boilermakers took their lumps in 2013. But Hazell has some options at quarterback, and this team should show small progress in the win department in 2014.
Final Grade: D

26. Sean Kugler, UTEP
Before: 3-9 (2-6) After: 2-10 (1-7)

Kugler is a former UTEP offensive lineman but had never worked as a coordinator or head coach on the collegiate level until 2013. As expected, Kugler took his lumps with a rebuilding roster this year, which included an injury to quarterback Jameill Showers. The Miners defeated New Mexico State and FIU and also lost two games (New Mexico and Louisiana Tech) by a touchdown or less. With a full year from Showers, UTEP’s offense will be better in 2014. However, the defense has ranked ninth or worse in Conference USA in yards allowed for three consecutive seasons. The Miners should show some improvement next year, but this team needs a full year from Showers and talented running back Aaron Jones. 
Final Grade: D

27. Doug Martin, New Mexico State
Before: 1-11 After: 2-10

Before a one-year stint as Boston College’s play-caller in 2012, Martin served as New Mexico State’s offensive coordinator in 2011. And Martin returned to Las Cruces to work under former coach DeWayne Walker, but he left for the NFL and Martin was promoted to head coach. With a FBS Independent schedule, wins were difficult to come by for New Mexico State. The Aggies played road games at Texas and UCLA and hosted BCS opponents in Minnesota and Boston College. New Mexico State won two of its final five games, but it’s tough to judge Martin with an impossible schedule. More will be known about Martin’s ability to coach in Las Cruces after the Aggies have one season in the Sun Belt in 2014.
Final Grade: D

28. Paul Petrino, Idaho
Before: 1-11 (1-5) After: 1-11

Much like New Mexico State’s Doug Martin, Petrino was placed into an impossible situation in 2013. The Vandals were an FBS Independent and faced a challenging schedule with few opportunities for wins. Idaho played Northern Illinois tough (45-35) and beat Temple 26-24 in late September for its only win of 2013. However, as expected, there were some ugly blowouts. The Vandals were pounded by Florida State 80-14 and lost 42-0 to Washington State. It’s unfair to judge Petrino based off of 2013. But joining the Sun Belt next year should help Idaho get on an even playing field.
Final Grade: D

29. P.J. Fleck, Western Michigan
Before: 4-8 (2-6) After: 1-11 (1-7)

Fleck brought energy and enthusiasm to Western Michigan. Unfortunately, that didn’t translate into victories. The Broncos were hit hard by injuries in the preseason, including a season-ending one to standout receiver Jaime Wilson. Western Michigan started the year with a 13-point loss to Michigan State, but a loss to Nicholls State quickly killed any momentum Fleck was hoping to build. The Broncos broke into the win column against UMass in late October and suffered back-to-back losses to Eastern Michigan and Central Michigan by a combined eight points. Western Michigan seemed to play better at the end of the season, and Fleck is bringing in a solid recruiting class. While Fleck’s recruiting ability appears to be very good, he needs to translate that into more victories in 2014.
Final Grade: D

30. Todd Monken, Southern Miss
Before: 0-12 (0-8) After: 1-11 (1-7)

Southern Mississippi’s fall as a top C-USA football program has been swift and surprising. The Golden Eagles had 18 consecutive winning seasons from 1994-2011. But Southern Miss has won just two games over the last two years. Monken inherited a bare cupboard on offense, and a defense that ranked near the bottom of the nation in points allowed. A tough non-conference schedule – Nebraska, Arkansas and Boise State – didn’t allow the Golden Eagles to get off to a good start. And this program struggled until late in the year before defeating UAB 62-27 in its final game. Monken has a lot of work on his plate this offseason, but Southern Miss may have found a quarterback in Nick Mullens and most of the starting lineup will return intact next year. Expect more improvement from Monken’s team in 2014.
Final Grade: D-

31. Ron Turner, FIU
Before: 3-9 (2-6) After: 1-11 (1-7)

Turner was a questionable hire for FIU. The former Illinois coach went 35-57 in his previous stint with the Fighting Illini and had only two winning seasons in eight years in Champaign. Another problem with Turner was his lack of ties to the Florida high school scene. Although FIU isn’t going to dominate in-state recruiting, it’s important for the program to keep recruits at home, instead of going to other Conference USA teams. Turner inherited a team short on returning starters, and the Panthers won only one game in 2013 – a 24-23 victory over Southern Miss. However, FIU was largely uncompetitive for the rest of the season, and the Panthers lost 34-13 to Bethune-Cookman. Turner is an odd fit at FIU, and he needs to show major progress in 2014.
Final Grade: F

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