Grading College Football's Head Coach Hires for 2013

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College football will have 30 new head coaches for 2013.

<p> Grading College Football's Head Coach Hires for 2013</p>

College football’s coaching carousel was in full effect this offseason. Thirty programs will have a new head coach in 2013, ranging from Arkansas, Auburn, Kentucky and Tennessee in the SEC to FBS newcomer Georgia State in the Sun Belt.

As with every offseason of coaching changes, there will be hits and misses among the new hires. And some programs (FIU) are just clueless from the start. Most of the schools looking for a new head coach did a good job of filling their vacancy this year and deserve a passing grade. For example, even though Western Michigan’s hire of P.J. Fleck is ranked near the bottom, the school did a good job of adding a coach that can bring some much-needed energy to the program.

Grading the new hires is an inexact science but previous head coaching experience, background/resume and how well they fit a program factored heavily in the rankings and letter grade. 

Grading and Ranking College Football's New Coach Hires for 2013

1. Willie Taggart, South Florida
Previous Job: Head coach at Western Kentucky
Career Record: 16-20 (3 years)
Grade: A+

Considering its location in a fertile recruiting area and lack of success in recent years, South Florida is a program that has a lot of room to grow. And the Bulls have taken the first step to elevating the program, hiring Taggart from Western Kentucky to be the third coach in school history. Taggart went 16-20 in three years with the Hilltoppers but significantly improved a program that had just made the jump to the FBS level and won two games in the two seasons prior to his arrival. He also gained valuable experience from his three-year stint as an assistant with Jim Harbaugh at Stanford. Additionally, Taggart is a Florida native and played high school football in Bradenton, which is just an hour outside of USF’s campus. Taggart should have no trouble attracting talent to South Florida, especially with his familiarity with the area. After the Bulls underachieved during the Skip Holtz tenure, look for Taggart to bring some much-needed toughness and consistency to Tampa. 
 

2. Bobby Petrino, Western Kentucky
Previous Job:
Head coach at Arkansas
Career Record: 75-26 (8 years)
Grade: A+

Considering what transpired at Arkansas, BCS programs with a vacancy weren’t ready to give Petrino a shot to be a head coach once again. But for Western Kentucky, this is a move that could pay big dividends - even if Petrino leaves after a couple of seasons. In eight years as a college head coach, Petrino has a 75-26 record with only one losing season (Arkansas in 2008). And with the Sun Belt race wide open next year, Petrino’s arrival could be enough for the Hilltoppers to win the conference championship. While the messy end to his tenure in Fayetteville will force Western Kentucky to keep a close eye on Petrino, there’s no reason to expect the Hilltoppers to see a decrease in wins after going 7-6 in 2012. Petrino will eventually jump to a BCS job, but the short-term risk is worth it for Western Kentucky.
 

3. Gary Andersen, Wisconsin
Previous Job:
Head coach at Utah State
Career Record: 30-31 (5 years)
Grade: A+

After a rebuilding project at Utah State, Andersen inherits a team at Wisconsin that can compete for the Big Ten title in 2013. Andersen took over in Logan in 2009, with the Aggies coming off 11 consecutive losing seasons. Utah State went 8-16 in his first two years but showed steady improvement by going 7-6 in 2011 and claimed an outright WAC title in 2012. Most of Andersen’s coaching experience has occurred out West, as he spent one year at Southern Utah and worked at Utah from 2004-08. The Utah native was hired by current Ohio State coach Urban Meyer when he was leading the Utes in 2004 and that insight could be valuable when the Buckeyes and Badgers meet this season. Wisconsin has been on a roll in recent seasons, making three consecutive Rose Bowl appearances, along with claiming double-digit victories in three out of the last four years. At Utah State, Andersen proved he can build a program from the ground up, while also showing he can take it to the next level. That task will be tougher in the Big Ten, but Andersen is one of college football’s top up-and-coming coaches and will have Wisconsin in the mix for the Big Ten title in 2013 and beyond.
 

4. Gus Malzahn, Auburn
Previous Job: Head coach at Arkansas State
Career Record: 9-3 (1 year)
Grade: A

After one season away, Malzahn has returned to Auburn to push the Tigers back into SEC West title contention. The former offensive coordinator was clearly one of the masterminds behind Auburn’s success from 2009-11 and will provide the program with some much-needed improvement in that area in 2013. In his only season at Arkansas State, Malzahn went 9-3 and led the Red Wolves to the Sun Belt title. While Malzahn is short on head coaching experience, his one season at Arkansas State should pay dividends at Auburn. The Tigers were awful on offense last season, averaging only 305 yards per game. Malzahn helped recruit a majority of the players on that side of the ball, including quarterback Kiehl Frazier, who could hold the keys to Auburn’s 2013 season. Malzahn should find a way to jumpstart the Tigers’ offense next year, and hiring Ellis Johnson as his defensive coordinator could be one of the top assistant moves of the offseason. Digging out of the mess Gene Chizik left behind won’t be easy, but Auburn should have a shot at a winning record in 2013.

Related Content: Big Questions Face New Coaches in the SEC

5. Kliff Kingsbury, Texas Tech
Previous Job:
Offensive coordinator at Texas A&M
Career Record: First Season
Grade: A

Kingsbury has been on a meteoric rise through the coaching ranks and returns to his alma mater after successful stints as an offensive coordinator at Houston and Texas A&M. The Texas native threw for over 12,000 yards under former Texas Tech head coach Mike Leach and had a short stint in the NFL with the Patriots, Saints and Jets. Kingsbury’s first coaching gig came under Kevin Sumlin at Houston in 2008, and during his time there and with Texas A&M, helped to coordinate some of the nation’s best offenses. At 33 years old, Kingsbury will be one of college football’s youngest head coaches, so expect a few bumps in the road for the Red Raiders. Despite his youth and inexperience, Kingsbury is the perfect fit in Lubbock. Considering his ties to the area and offensive prowess, Kingsbury should make Texas Tech one of the Big 12’s most intriguing programs to watch over the next few seasons, while remaining a consistent winner and annual bowl team.
 

6. Bret Bielema, Arkansas
Previous Job: Head coach at Wisconsin
Career Record: 68-24 (7 years)
Grade: A

Outside of Tommy Tuberville leaving Texas Tech for Cincinnati, the biggest surprise of the coaching carousel was Bielema leaving Wisconsin for Arkansas. After accumulating a 68-24 mark and three Rose Bowl appearances in seven years, Bielema may have felt he took Wisconsin football as far as it could go in this current climate. With Ohio State and Michigan back on the rise once again, the rest of the teams in the Big Ten face an uphill battle to win the conference title. While moving from Wisconsin to Arkansas is almost a lateral move in terms of job prestige, Bielema has more money to pay his assistants and has a chance to prove he can coach among the best of the best in the SEC. The Razorbacks are facing an uphill battle in 2013, largely due to the departure of a handful of key players. However, the potential is there for this program to turn things around in 2014, as Bielema pieced together an impressive group of assistants, and athletic director Jeff Long is committed to giving the coaching staff whatever it takes to succeed. One downside for Arkansas and Bielema: The SEC isn’t getting any easier. 
 

7. Sonny Dykes, California
Previous Job: Head coach at Louisiana Tech
Career Record: 22-15 (3 years)
Grade: A

Jeff Tedford had a successful tenure as California’s head coach, but the program grew stale over the last few years, recording a 15-22 mark from 2010-12. Although the Golden Bears have slipped recently, Dykes is the right coach to get California back on track. In three seasons at Louisiana Tech, he led the Bulldogs to a 22-15 record, including one bowl appearance in 2011. Dykes and offensive coordinator Tony Franklin are two of the top offensive minds in college football, helping to guide Louisiana Tech to an average of 51.5 points a game in 2012. Although Dykes has no coaching experience in California, he worked under Mike Stoops at Arizona from 2007-09. The Texas native also served as a wide receivers coach and co-offensive coordinator at Texas Tech from 2000-06. With no proven quarterback and holes on defense to fill, California may struggle to get bowl eligible in 2012. However, Dykes is a good fit and the right hire to get the Golden Bears competitive once again in the Pac-12 North.
 

8. Dave Doeren, NC State
Previous Job:
Head coach at Northern Illinois
Career Record: 23-4 (2 years)
Grade: A

Although Tom O’Brien led NC State to four bowl games in the last five years, it wasn’t enough for athletic director Debbie Yow. Hoping to elevate the Wolfpack into a contender in the ACC Atlantic, Yow moved quickly in hiring Doeren away from Northern Illinois. The Kansas native has been on the fast track through the coaching ranks, which includes stops at USC, Kansas and Wisconsin as an assistant, before leading the Huskies to a 23-4 mark over the last two years. Although Doeren played a key role in leading Northern Illinois to the Orange Bowl this season, he did inherit plenty of talent from former coach Jerry Kill. Additionally, Doeren has no ties to the ACC and will need time to develop recruiting connections within the state. Although there are question marks for Doeren to answer over the next few years, he built a solid coaching staff, which includes former Wisconsin offensive coordinator Matt Canada and Dave Huxtable as defensive coordinator. NC State isn’t likely to consistently beat Florida State and Clemson in the ACC Atlantic, but there’s no reason why the Wolfpack can’t be more successful in the win column. And fulfilling that challenge will be Doeren’s goal in 2013 and beyond.
 

9. Mike MacIntyre, Colorado
Previous Job:
Head coach at San Jose State
Career Record: 16-21 (3 years)
Grade: A

MacIntyre is the perfect case of why records for a head coach can be deceiving. At first glance, a 16-21 record isn’t much of an accomplishment. However, dig a little deeper and it’s easy to see why MacIntyre was one of the top non-BCS coaches on the market. The Spartans were coming off a 2-10 season prior to MacIntyre’s arrival and hit rock bottom with a 1-12 mark in 2010. MacIntyre brought steady improvement to San Jose State in his second year, leading the Spartans to a 5-7 record and then a 10-2 mark during the 2012 regular season. After turning around one program, MacIntyre will have a similar task ahead of him in Boulder. Colorado has not had a winning season since 2005 and is in need of facility improvements. MacIntyre is the right coach for the job, but the Buffaloes need to be patient. Expect progress in 2013, but if Colorado is going to have long-term success, MacIntyre needs to build by recruiting freshmen (not JUCOs), while the administration makes a commitment to winning, as well as provides the staff with the necessary facility upgrades. 
 

10. Trent Miles, Georgia State
Previous Job:
Head coach at Indiana State
Career Record: 20-36 (5 years)
Grade: A

Miles is the highest-ranked coach from a non-BCS conference in Athlon’s look at the new hires for 2013. The Indiana native has made several stops as an assistant in his career, beginning at Indiana State in 1987, then on to New Mexico, Oklahoma, Northern Illinois, Hawaii, Fresno State, Stanford, Washington, Notre Dame and in the NFL with the Packers for one season. After serving as an assistant from 1987-2007, Miles landed his first coaching gig at his alma mater – Indiana State. The Sycamores were a disaster prior to his arrival, recording a dismal 1-32 mark from 2005-07. Although Miles went just 1-22 in his first two seasons, Indiana State improved to 19-14 over his last three years and finished 2012 ranked in the FCS Top 25. The Sycamores were also the only team to beat FCS champion North Dakota State last season. Just as he did at Indiana State, Miles isn’t inheriting much to work with at Georgia State. The Panthers are coming off a 1-10 season and will be playing a full Sun Belt schedule in 2013. With a fertile recruiting area to work with, Miles should get Georgia State football competitive within the conference in the next two years.
 

11. Tommy Tuberville, Cincinnati
Previous Job: 
Head coach at Texas Tech
Career Record: 130-77 (17 years)
Grade: B+

In perhaps the coaching carousel’s biggest offseason surprise, Tuberville decided to bolt Texas Tech for Cincinnati. Tuberville wasn’t in any real danger of losing his job in Lubbock, although athletic director Kirby Hocutt wanted to see the program improve from its 2012 record (7-5) in 2013. Adding to the curiosity of this move is the uncertain conference future surrounding Cincinnati. While this move has plenty of question marks, there’s no denying Tuberville is a good coach. He went 25-20 in four seasons with Ole Miss and 85-40 in 10 years with Auburn. After spending most of his time in the South, Tuberville will need some time to get acquainted with Cincinnati’s recruiting area. The Arkansas native prefers to lean on his defense to win but adapted to the style of play in the Big 12, keeping the Red Raiders’ offense among the best in the conference. One question that will play out over the next few years is whether or not Tuberville is committed to Cincinnati for the long haul. The Bearcats are on their fourth head coach in 10 seasons and establishing stability, as well as continuing to elevate the program's profile for the next round of conference expansion, will be crucial. 
 

12. Butch Jones, Tennessee
Previous Job: Head coach at Cincinnati
Career Record: 50-27 (6 years)
Grade: B+

For the second time in three years, Tennessee’s coaching search didn’t go smoothly. The Volunteers had to find a replacement in mid-January of 2010 once Lane Kiffin left to replace Pete Carroll at USC. And this time around, Tennessee had trouble attracting a big-name coach. While Rocky Top might not be as desirable of a job as it was 10 years ago, the Volunteers still have all of the resources in place to consistently compete for SEC East titles. Although Jones doesn’t bring the national reputation that Charlie Strong would have, this is still a solid hire for Tennessee. Jones started his coaching career in 1990 at Rutgers, then made stops at Wilkes, Ferris State, Central Michigan and West Virginia. The Michigan native took over at Central Michigan in 2007, leading the Chippewas to a 27-13 record in three seasons. Jones then went to Cincinnati and compiled a 23-14 mark from 2010-12. Considering this is his first coaching gig in the SEC, Jones will have an adjustment period in getting acquainted with the 13 other teams and coaches. Additionally, he also will have to overcome questions about building a program on his own for the first time, as Jones followed Brian Kelly at Central Michigan and Cincinnati, never staying at either program for more than three years. There are question marks surrounding Jones, but he should be an improvement over Derek Dooley.
 

13. Darrell Hazell, Purdue
Previous Job:
Head coach at Kent State
Career Record: 16-10 (2 years)
Grade: B+

After four mediocre seasons under Danny Hope, Purdue hopes Hazell is the right coach to lead the program back into Big Ten title contention. Hazell comes to West Lafayette after two seasons with Kent State, which included the program’s first MAC East title and second bowl appearance in school history. The Golden Flashes took eventual MAC champion Northern Illinois to overtime, and a victory in the conference championship game would have sent Kent State to the Orange Bowl. The New Jersey native is familiar with the surroundings in the Big Ten, as he worked as an assistant under Jim Tressel at Ohio State from 2004-10. Hazell’s resume is solid, and the only negative to find about this hire is the lack of long-term success as a head coach. 
 

14. Mark Stoops, Kentucky
Previous Job:
Defensive coordinator at Florida State
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B+

With Vanderbilt’s recent ascension and the expansion of the conference to include Texas A&M and Missouri, Kentucky needed to make a coaching change to avoid falling too far behind the rest of the SEC. While Stoops doesn’t have any previous head coaching experience, he has brought some much-needed energy into the program, along with making Kentucky a factor on the recruiting trail. The Ohio native has good bloodlines, as his brothers Mike (Arizona) and Bob (Oklahoma) have head coaching experience and are a good soundboard for advice for the first-year coach. Stoops was one of the nation’s top assistants during his time at Florida State, leading the Seminoles to back-to-back top-10 finishes in total defense. So far, Stoops has made all of the right moves in Lexington. He hired a top-notch staff, which includes bringing former Kentucky player Neal Brown back to coordinate the offense. Brown is considered one of college football's rising stars in the assistant ranks, guiding Texas Tech to a rank of second nationally in passing offense in 2012. The Wildcats are also making some noise on the recruiting trail and should finish with a solid class. Stoops still has a lot to prove, but the Wildcats are on the right track.
 

15. Mark Helfrich, Oregon
Previous Job:
Offensive coordinator at Oregon
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B

There’s no question Helfrich will be one of the most-scrutinized head coaches in 2013. The Oregon native has been handed the keys to a Ferrari and with no head coaching experience, is tasked with keeping the Ducks among the nation’s perennial national title contenders. No pressure right? While Helfrich’s lack of head coaching experience is a concern, he has spent the last four years working closely with Chip Kelly. Helfrich didn’t call the plays on offense but had a hand in developing the Ducks’ up-tempo, high-scoring attack. Promoting from within worked well for Oregon in the past, as Mike Bellotti was tabbed to replace Rich Brooks after his departure, and Kelly succeeded Bellotti. However, the stakes are higher for Oregon in 2013. The Ducks are under NCAA investigation, and Stanford has emerged as a national title contender in the Pac-12 North. Is Helfrich the next Larry Coker or the next Chris Petersen? Only time will tell, but the Oregon native should keep the Ducks in the mix to win a national championship in 2013.
 

16. Bryan Harsin, Arkansas State
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at Texas
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B

After working as Boise State’s offensive coordinator from 2006-10, Harsin was regarded as one of college football’s rising stars in the coaching ranks. Two seasons in Texas have slightly dimmed Harsin’s prospects, however. The Longhorns struggled to get consistent quarterback play under his watch but averaged 35.7 points a game in 2012. Harsin fits the mold of Arkansas State’s recent head coaches, as the school has targeted younger, offensive-minded coordinators (Gus Malzahn and Hugh Freeze). Harsin doesn’t have any head coaching experience but the Boise native gained valuable experience by working under Chris Petersen and Mack Brown.
 

17. Todd Monken, Southern Miss
Previous Job:
Offensive coordinator at Oklahoma State
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B

Southern Miss made one of the worst coaching hires of 2012, choosing Ellis Johnson to replace Larry Fedora. After a failed one-year stint for Johnson, the program got it right by hiring Monken. The Illinois native has made stops as an assistant at Notre Dame, Eastern Michigan, Louisiana Tech, LSU, and Oklahoma State where he served as Mike Gundy’s offensive coordinator since 2011. He also has NFL experience, working with the Jacksonville Jaguars from 2007-10. Monken tutored first-round draft picks Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon in 2011, and despite starting three different quarterbacks in 2012, still led the Cowboys to an average of 45.7 points a game. Monken doesn’t have any head coaching experience, but his background on offense is a perfect fit for Southern Miss and Conference USA. The Golden Eagles still have plenty of talent in the program, so going from 0-12 in 2012 to a bowl game in 2013 is certainly possible. The only downside for Southern Miss? If Monken is successful, he may not stick around too long in Hattiesburg.
 

18. Steve Addazio, Boston College
Previous Job:
Head coach at Temple
Career Record: 13-11 (2 years)
Grade: B-

Boston College has fallen on hard times over the last two years. The Eagles were once one of the ACC’s most consistent teams, recording 12 consecutive winning seasons from 1999-2010. After a failed stint under Frank Spaziani, Addazio is a good pickup to get the program back on track. Considering Addazio’s ties in the Northeast, he should be able to help Boston College keep some of the top talent from leaving the area. In addition to his work as a relentless recruiter, Addazio went 13-11 in two seasons with Temple and led the program to just its fourth bowl appearance in school history in 2011. The Connecticut native isn’t flashy but is bringing much-needed energy into the program. Boston College may not win an ACC title under Addazio, but the program will be more competitive and is in better shape than it was under Spaziani.  
 

19. Matt Rhule, Temple
Previous Job:
Assistant OL coach with the New York Giants
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B-

Steve Addazio’s decision to bolt Temple for Boston College came as a small surprise, but the Owls made a good decision to bring Rhule back to Philadelphia. The former Penn State player joined the Temple staff under Al Golden in 2006, before becoming the team’s offensive coordinator from 2008-10. Rhule stayed under Addazio for one season (2011) before joining the Giants as an assistant offensive line coach in 2012. The Pennsylvania native doesn’t have head coaching experience but there’s a lot to like about this hire. Considering Rhule worked at Temple under Golden and grew up in the Quaker State, building recruiting connections in the area won’t be a problem. Rhule is inheriting some promising young talent, and the Owls are in much better shape than when he was an assistant back in 2006.


20. Scott Shafer, Syracuse
Previous Job: Defensive coordinator at Syracuse
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B-

Doug Marrone’s decision to leave for the NFL in early January left Syracuse in a difficult situation. Starting a coaching search in the prime recruiting season is never ideal, and most of the top head coaches and assistants looking to improve their current position had already accepted a new job. With those factors in mind, promoting Shafer to replace Marrone makes a lot of sense for Syracuse. Shafer joined Marrone’s staff in 2009 but has never served as a head coach since becoming a collegiate assistant in 1991. The Ohio native also has stops as a defensive coordinator at Michigan, Syracuse, Stanford, Western Michigan and Northern Illinois. Losing Marrone is a big blow to Syracuse, but Shafer has experience in the program and will have an opportunity to build on the culture that worked from the past few seasons.
 

21. Matt Wells, Utah State
Previous Job:
Offensive coordinator at Utah State
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B-

Replacing a successful head coach like Gary Andersen is no easy task, but Wells’ familiarity with Utah State should pay big dividends for the program. The Oklahoma native played in Logan under former Utah State head coaches Charlie Weatherbie and John L. Smith from 1993-96. Wells started his coaching career at Navy in 1997 and stayed with the Midshipmen until leaving for Tulsa in 2002. After five seasons with the Golden Hurricane, he spent two years at New Mexico, one with Louisville and then another season with the Lobos, before joining Andersen’s staff in 2011. Wells was promoted to offensive coordinator in 2012, guiding the Aggies to an average of 34.9 points a game. Wells has never been a head coach but his work as the team’s offensive coordinator, along with the experience as a former player should have Utah State feeling optimistic he can continue to build off of Andersen’s success. 


22. Brian Polian, Nevada
Previous Job: Special teams coordinator/Tight Ends coach at Texas A&M
Career Record: First Season
Grade: B-

Polian has big shoes to fill in Reno, as he replaces Nevada coaching legend Chris Ault. The former coach was one of college football’s most innovative head coaches, bringing the Pistol Offense to life in 2005, and he played a key role in shaping the current overtime rules. While Ault leaves behind quite a legacy in Reno, Polian seems to be a good hire for a program that should be a bowl team in 2013. Brian has been around football all of his life, as his dad Bill worked in the front office for the Colts, Panthers and Bills. Brian started his coaching career at Michigan State in 1997 and quickly rose through the ranks, making stops at Buffalo, Baylor, UCF and then Notre Dame in 2005. After five years in South Bend, Polian joined Jim Harbaugh’s staff at Stanford as the special teams coordinator and worked in that role until 2012, leaving to take the same position at Texas A&M. Polian doesn’t have head coaching or coordinator experience but is regarded as an excellent recruiter and made a good decision to retain current offensive coordinator Nick Rolovich. It’s always risky to hire someone with no head coaching experience, but Polian’s ability to recruit should be a positive for a program that can compete for the Mountain West title each year.
 

23. Ron Caragher, San Jose State
Previous Job: Head coach at San Diego
Career Record: 44-22 (6 years)
Grade: B-

In just four years, San Jose State has moved from WAC doormat to a potential Mountain West title contender in 2013. Much of the credit goes to former coach Mike MacIntyre, who led the Spartans to their first double-digit win total since 1987. Although MacIntyre left for Colorado, he is leaving the program in better shape than how he found it in 2010. Caragher succeeded Jim Harbaugh at San Diego, leading the Toreros to a 44-22 mark in six seasons. While Caragher still has much to prove, this seems to be a good fit for both parties. As a California native and with his experience coaching within the state, Caragher should have plenty of ties to help San Jose State on the recruiting trail. Although he followed Harbaugh, Caragher had back-to-back losing seasons in 2009-10 but steered the program back on track with a 17-5 mark from 2011-12.
 

24. Skip Holtz, Louisiana Tech
Previous Job: Head coach at South Florida
Career Record: 88-71 (13 years)
Grade: C

Holtz’s failed tenure at South Florida is one of the most puzzling coaching stints in recent memory. After leading Connecticut to a 34-23 record in five seasons and a 38-27 mark in five years with East Carolina, Holtz was pegged as the right coach to take the Bulls into Big East title contention. After an 8-5 debut season, South Florida went 8-16 in the next two years, which included just two wins in conference play. Considering what transpired at USF, Louisiana Tech fans have to be curious about whether the coach is in decline or whether the program had more issues than appeared on the surface, making it a difficult place to win. Holtz has experienced a lot of success in his career and landing at a program like Louisiana Tech is a good opportunity to prove he’s still a good coach and one that’s capable of taking over at a BCS program once again. It’s easy to point to Holtz’s failures at USF, but his win totals at Connecticut and East Carolina are hard to ignore.
 

25. Rod Carey, Northern Illinois
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at Northern Illinois
Career Record: 0-1 (first full season)
Grade: C

With Dave Doeren’s leaving for NC State, Carey was handed the keys to one of the MAC’s top programs. Northern Illinois has won at least 11 games in each of the last three years and has posted only two losing seasons since 2000. Carey has experienced a fast rise through the coaching ranks, starting his career as a graduate assistant at Minnesota in 1998, before working his way up to offensive line coach at North Dakota in 2008. Carey joined Doeren in DeKalb in 2011 and was the team’s offensive coordinator in 2012. Promoting from within is often the best way to keep continuity, as well as build on recent success. Carey will have a chance to do that in 2013, as the Huskies will be the preseason favorite to win the MAC. Although his debut resulted in a loss to Florida State in the Orange Bowl, Carey’s real test will come this season, as he must guide a program for a full season for the first time.
 

26. Paul Petrino, Idaho
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at Arkansas
Career Record: First Season
Grade: C

Considering the uncertain conference future facing Idaho, the program wasn't going to attract a proven coach. Petrino isn’t as proven or established as his brother Bobby, but the Montana native is ready for his first head coaching job after working as an assistant in the college and NFL ranks since 1990. Paul worked as the offensive coordinator under Bobby at Louisville from 2003-06, Arkansas from 2008-09 and then again wtih the Hogs under John L. Smith in 2012. Considering the Vandals are without a conference home for at least the next few years, Petrino is inheriting one of college football’s toughest coaching jobs. The 45-year-old coach has prior experience at the school and having the last name Petrino certainly doesn’t hurt on the recruiting trail.
 

27. Paul Haynes, Kent State
Previous Job: Defensive coordinator at Arkansas
Career Record: First Season
Grade: C

After recording a 16-10 mark and one MAC East title under Darrell Hazell, Kent State is turning to a former player to maintain the program as a conference title contender in 2013. Haynes is a good fit for the Golden Flashes, as he is an Ohio native, played at Kent State from 1987-91 and has a wealth of experience as an assistant. Haynes has stops at Northern Iowa, Kent State, Louisville, Michigan State, Ohio State and served as Arkansas’ defensive coordinator in 2011. While it’s hard to glean much from serving one year as a coordinator in Fayetteville, the Razorbacks ranked 73rd nationally in yards allowed and gave up 30.4 points a game. Although Haynes’ background should be a positive for Kent State, his lack of head coaching experience and a less than stellar season at Arkansas leaves this hire near the bottom of the new coaches for 2013.   


28. P.J. Fleck, Western Michigan
Previous Job: Wide receivers coach with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Career Record: First season
Grade: C

At 32 years old, Fleck is college football’s youngest head coach. And the Illinois native has brought some much-needed enthusiasm to the program since his appointment in mid-December. Although hiring a young coach with no experience to lead a program is risky, this could be a good fit for Western Michigan. Fleck played at Northern Illinois in the MAC from 1999-2003 and caught 77 passes for 1,028 yards and six scores as a senior. He started as a graduate assistant in 2006 at Ohio State, spent two years at Northern Illinois (2007-09) and Rutgers (2010-11), before joining Greg Schiano in Tampa Bay for 2012. The lack of coordinator or head coaching experience is a concern, but Fleck’s background on offense is a good fit in the MAC and is a low-risk option for Western Michigan.
 

29. Sean Kugler, UTEP
Previous Job:
Offensive line coach with the Pittsburgh Steelers
Career Record: First season
Grade: D

Kugler is a familiar face in El Paso, as he played at UTEP from 1984-88 and worked as an assistant for the school from 1993-2000. The New York native has spent most of his coaching career in the NFL, making stops with the Lions, Bills and Steelers. Kugler has one year of experience from coaching offensive linemen at Boise State but has never served as a coordinator or head coach. Although the Steelers dealt with injuries on the offensive line over the last three seasons, the unit was never a strength, allowing 122 sacks during that span. Despite his familiarity with the program, Kugler’s lack of head coaching experience and mediocre performance in Pittsburgh has UTEP on the wrong end of the new coach rankings for 2013.
 

30. Ron Turner, FIU
Previous Job: Quarterbacks coach with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Career Record: 42-61
Grade: F

In the worst coaching move of the offseason, FIU traded a good coach (Mario Cristobal) for a retread. Even though Cristobal’s overall mark was 27-47 in six years with the Golden Panthers, he clearly elevated a program that was in disarray prior to his arrival in 2007. Turner spent one season as the head coach at San Jose State in 1992 and at Illinois from 1997-2004. Under his watch, the Fighting Illini went 35-57 and made only two bowl appearances. Turner has NFL experience but outside of one season with the Buccaneers, has never coached in the state of Florida. Considering how important recruiting ties are in the Miami area, Turner is clearly a bad fit for a program that shouldn’t have made a coaching switch.


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