Grading College Football's Head Coach Hires for 2014

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Penn State gets high marks for hiring James Franklin.

Grading College Football's Head Coach Hires for 2014

After a whopping 31 changes last year, college football’s head coach carousel was relatively quiet this offseason.

The 2013-14 cycle featured just 20 teams making a switch at head coach. But the offseason wasn’t short on drama, as two of college football’s premier jobs opened (USC and Texas), while there was movement in early January at Penn State, UAB and Vanderbilt.

All 20 schools hiring a coach graded out well in this year’s report card. There were no D’s or F’s awarded, and eight schools will be bringing home a letter grade of A.

Penn State and Washington were the two biggest winners of the coaching cycle. The Nittany Lions hired James Franklin away from Vanderbilt, while the Huskies managed to lure Chris Petersen from Boise State. Franklin and Petersen should win plenty of games at their new home.

Louisville made one of the most intriguing moves of the offseason by hiring Bobby Petrino to replace Charlie Strong. Petrino is no stranger to Louisville, but he certainly comes with some baggage.

At the bottom of the rankings, Western Kentucky’s Jeff Brohm ranks as the No. 20 coach in the hires, but he should be a good fit in Bowling Green.

In most coaching cycles, there will be a handful of teams that simply make a bad hire. But in 2014, all schools appear to have met their needs and hired a quality coach.

Grading College Football's New Coach Hires for 2014

1. James Franklin, Penn State
Previous Job: Head coach at Vanderbilt
Career Record: 24-15 (3 years)

Bill O’Brien only stayed at Penn State for two seasons, but he stabilized and kept the program from collapsing after NCAA sanctions limited scholarships and included a four-year bowl ban. Fast forward to 2014 and the Nittany Lions are slowly digging out of the NCAA sanctions, and the program made the offseason’s top hire by pulling Franklin away from Vanderbilt. Penn State is one of the top 15-20 jobs in college football, and with Franklin leading the way, this program is poised to return to national prominence. In three years at Vanderbilt – the SEC’s toughest job – Franklin guided the Commodores to a 24-15 mark, including back-to-back nine-win seasons. Under Franklin’s watch, Vanderbilt finished ranked in the final Associated Press poll in both 2012 and '13 and went 9-7 in SEC play during that span. The nine victories in SEC play since 2012 are the best two-year conference record for the Commodores since 1934-35. In addition to his success on the field, Franklin is regarded as an outstanding recruiter and motivator. Franklin grew up in Pennsylvania and played his college ball at East Stroudsburg, so coming to Penn State is essentially a homecoming for the 41-year-old coach. Some will dismiss Franklin’s record as not enough for a job like Penn State. However, let’s also consider how difficult it is to win at Vanderbilt. Franklin is bringing a top-notch staff to Happy Valley, including offensive line coach Herb Hand and defensive coordinator Bob Shoop. Expect Franklin to win – and win big – at Penn State.

Final Grade: A+

2. Chris Petersen, Washington
Previous Job: Head coach at Boise State
Career Record: 92-12 (8 years)

Petersen’s name popped up for various openings at BCS programs over the last seven years, but he stayed at Boise State for eight years, recording an impressive 92-12 mark with two BCS bowl victories. Despite turning down overtures from BCS programs in previous seasons, 2014 was just the right time for Petersen to leave Boise State. Petersen is a California native, but he has spent most of his coaching tenure in the Pacific Northwest. Petersen worked as an assistant at Portland State from 1993-94, Oregon from 1995-2000 and at Boise State from 2001-05. After Dan Hawkins left for Colorado, Petersen was promoted to head coach in 2006. The Broncos won at least 10 games in seven of Petersen’s eight seasons and had four top-10 finishes in the Associated Press poll. Matching 92 victories in eight years will be difficult at Washington, but Petersen is a good fit for Seattle. Former coach Steve Sarkisian rebuilt a program that bottomed out after an 0-12 mark in 2008. But now it’s up to Petersen to elevate Washington back into Pac-12 title contention. With a new stadium and good facilities, everything is in place for the Huskies to win big. 

Final Grade: A+

3. Craig Bohl, Wyoming
Previous Job: Head coach at North Dakota State
Career Record: 104-32 (11 years)

Considering North Dakota State’s recent success, it was no surprise Bohl was hired by a FBS program. But it comes as a surprise he ends up at Wyoming and not a BCS team. Regardless of location or team, Wyoming made one of the top hires of the 2013-14 coaching carousel. Bohl was hired as North Dakota State’s coach in 2003 and had only one losing season during his 11-year stint in Fargo. The Bison moved to the FCS level in 2004 and won 35 games in their first four seasons after making the transition. After an 9-13 stint from 2008-09, North Dakota State has emerged as the top program in the FCS ranks. The Bison are 43-2 over their last three years and won three consecutive FCS titles. Prior to taking over at North Dakota State, Bohl worked as an assistant under Tom Osborne and Frank Solich at Nebraska, while also making stops at Duke, Rice, Wisconsin and Tulsa. Bohl isn’t flashy, and he prefers a strong defense and rushing attack to the wide-open spread offenses taking over college football. But make no mistake, he knows how to win and built North Dakota State into a powerhouse on the FCS level. There’s a lot of work to be done at Wyoming and rebuilding won’t be easy. However, Bohl is clearly capable of leading the Cowboys back into Mountain West title contention.

Final Grade: A+

4. Derek Mason, Vanderbilt
Previous Job: Defensive coordinator at Stanford
Career Record: First Season

In terms of fit, there’s not a better one in this coaching cycle than Mason and Vanderbilt. Mason spent the last four years at Stanford, including the last three as the defensive coordinator. Under Mason’s direction, the Cardinal never allowed an average of more than 22 points per game from 2011-13 and allowed less than five yards per play in 2012-13. Prior to his stint at Stanford, Mason worked for three years with the Vikings (2007-09) and served as an assistant at a handful of stops, including Ohio, New Mexico State, St. Mary’s, Utah, Bucknell, Idaho State, Weber State and San Diego Mesa College. Despite his connections on the West Coast, Mason recruited Florida for Stanford, and his experience at an academic institution will be a huge plus as he attempts to replicate Franklin’s success. There’s very little to dislike about this hire for Vanderbilt. Mason is one of the top coordinators in college football and is well-liked by his players. He also is a good recruiter and developed some of the Pac-12’s top defensive players during his stint in Palo Alto. The only knock on Mason is a lack of head coaching experience, especially as he jumps into the SEC. Also, Franklin was persistent about facility and program upgrades. Can Mason continue to push Vanderbilt for more improvements to keep this program trending in the right direction?

Final Grade: A

5. Dino Babers, Bowling Green
Previous Job: Head coach at Eastern Illinois
Career Record: 19-7 (2 years)

With a wealth of experience and a background on offense, Babers should feel right at home in the MAC next season. After spending nearly 30 years as an assistant, Babers earned his first head coaching gig at Eastern Illinois in 2012. The Panthers went 7-5 in Babers’ first season and 12-2 in 2013, losing to Towson in the FCS playoffs. Prior to Babers tenure, Eastern Illinois won just four games in two seasons. Babers inherited quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo – a likely pick in the 2014 NFL Draft – but he transformed the Illinois native into the 2013 Walter Payton Award winner. Before he was a head coach at Eastern Illinois, Babers worked as an assistant under Art Briles at Baylor for three seasons and made stops at UCLA, Pittsburgh, Texas A&M, Arizona, San Diego State, Purdue, Northern Arizona and UNLV. Babers has clearly paid his dues as an assistant and transformed Eastern Illinois into a playoff team in back-to-back seasons. Yes, there’s some risk hiring someone who has only two years of head coaching experience, but Babers’ offense-first approach should work for a Bowling Green team that returns quarterback Matt Johnson and running back Travis Greene in 2014.

Final Grade: A

6. Charlie Strong, Texas
Previous Job: Head coach at Louisville
Career Record: 37-16 (4 years)

Mack Brown set the bar high for Texas after a run of nine seasons with at least 10 wins from 2001-09. But the Longhorns regressed at the end of his tenure, finishing the last four years with an 18-17 record in Big 12 play. Strong isn’t the politician that Brown was, but a different approach is what Texas needs. In four years at Louisville, Strong went 37-15 and won 23 games over the last two seasons. The Cardinals played in four straight bowl games under Strong’s watch and finished in the top 15 of the final Associated Press poll in both 2012 and '13. Strong also transformed Louisville’s defense, as the Cardinals never finished outside of the top 25 nationally in yards allowed per game. As evidenced by the numbers above, there are no doubts about Strong’s coaching ability. He’s an excellent motivator and is a strong X’s and O’s coach. But his decision to leave Louisville – a year after turning down Tennessee – is a surprise. Despite all of the perks and built-in advantages of coaching in Texas, Strong doesn’t seem like the best fit in Austin. For a coach that isn’t crazy about media obligations, he will face extra scrutiny with the Longhorn Network – something that could eat into his time to coach each week. It may not be the best possible fit, but Strong is going to bring immediate improvement to Texas in 2014.

Final Grade: A-

7. Dave Clawson, Wake Forest
Previous Job: Head coach at Bowling Green
Career Record: 90-80 (14 years)

Clawson inherits one of the toughest jobs in the ACC, but the New York native is a proven winner at three previous stops. From 1999-2003 at Fordham, he recorded a 29-29 mark over five seasons, which included 26 wins over the final three years. Clawson went 3-8 in his first season at Richmond but rebounded to win 26 games over the final three seasons. The Spiders also finished in the top 10 of the final FCS poll twice. Clawson experienced immediate success at Bowling Green, guiding the Falcons to a 7-6 record in 2009. The program took a step back in 2010, bottoming out to 2-10 overall. But Clawson’s team wasn’t down for long, as he improved Bowling Green’s win total by three games from 2010 to '11, and the Falcons made back-to-back bowls in 2012-13. He also has experience from time as an offense coordinator at Tennessee (2008) and Villanova (1996-98). Jim Grobe took Wake Forest to new heights in 2006, but the Demon Deacons were unable to sustain that success for long. Clawson has a tough job ahead in the coming seasons, but he has a track record of success and has won at three different programs. Considering Clawson has excelled at getting the most out of his roster at Fordham, Richmond and Bowling Green, that coaching style should work at a place like Wake Forest where recruiting five- or four-star players is tough. 

Final Grade: A-

8. Bobby Petrino, Louisville
Previous Job: Head coach at Western Kentucky
Career Record: 83-30 (9 years)

Mention the name Bobby Petrino to any college football fan and you are likely to get a variety of reactions. Sure, there’s baggage. Petrino left Louisville after signing a 10-year contract in 2006, had a disastrous one-year stint with the Falcons and was fired after lying to Arkansas’ athletic director Jeff Long in '12. After the end of his tenure in Fayetteville, it’s surprising Petrino has rebounded this quickly into a BCS job. He spent 2013 at Western Kentucky, guiding the Hilltoppers to an 8-4 mark. Petrino’s career record is 83-30 and he has only one season of fewer than eight wins in his nine seasons in college. There’s no question what you are getting with Petrino. The Montana native is going to win a lot of games and is one of the top offensive minds in college football. But you also inherit the baggage, and the concern he’s always looking to jump to another job. However, if there’s anyone that could hire Petrino away from Western Kentucky, Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich is one of the few. Jurich, widely respected as one of the top athletic directors in college football, likely knows Petrino better than anyone. And with a $10 million buyout, Petrino isn’t going anywhere. With a move to the ACC on tap, this is an important hire for Louisville. Bringing back Petrino probably isn’t the most popular move for this program, but Jurich is choosing familiarity and a proven winner. In a tougher league, the Cardinals need to be competitive right away and the baggage is worth the risk.

Final Grade: B+

9. Steve Sarkisian, USC
Previous Job: Head coach at Washington
Career Record: 34-29 (5 years)

After five years at Washington, Sarkisian returns to his old stomping grounds, taking over at one of college football’s premier jobs. Sarkisian’s overall record at Washington was only 34-29, but the Huskies made considerable progress under his watch. Prior to Sarkisian’s arrival in 2009, Washington won just 11 games in the four previous seasons. The Huskies won at least five Pac-12 contests in four out of Sarkisian’s five years in Seattle, with a 4-5 mark in his first season. Washington didn’t win big, but there was clear progress. And with Oregon and Stanford among the nation’s elite, it wasn’t easy for the Huskies to make any progress in the Pac-12 North. At USC, Sarkisian isn’t inheriting a rebuilding project and this is arguably one of the top five jobs in college football. The heavy NCAA sanctions this program was handed as a result of the Reggie Bush investigation are nearly over. Everything appears to be set for the Trojans to return to national prominence. While Sarkisian may not have been the splashy hire some USC fans expected, he’s a California native with previous experience at USC. He’s also a good offensive coach and has recruited four consecutive top-25 classes at Washington. Armed with a top-notch staff, Sarkisian is capable of winning big at USC.

Final Grade: B

10. Bryan Harsin, Boise State
Previous Job: Head coach at Arkansas State
Career Record: 7-5 (1 year)

It’s hard to call a coach a perfect fit for any job, but Harsin is truly a perfect match for Boise State. Harsin grew up in Boise, played with the Broncos from 1995-99 and later served as an assistant at the school from 2001-10. As Boise State’s offensive coordinator from 2006-10, he directed an attack that averaged at least 400 yards in every season. Harsin was hired at Texas in 2011 and called the plays for the Longhorns for two seasons. He spent one year as the head coach at Arkansas State, helping the Red Wolves to a 7-5 overall record with an appearance in the GoDaddy Bowl. Harsin’s team lost to Auburn, Memphis and Missouri in non-conference play but lost by just three points to Western Kentucky and 23-7 to Sun Belt champ Louisiana-Lafayette. Replacing Chris Petersen is a tough assignment, but Harsin seems to be the perfect fit. Harsin’s one-year stint at Arkansas State will help with his takeover at Boise State, especially as he inherits a team capable of winning the Mountain West in 2014.

Final Grade: B

11. Willie Fritz, Georgia Southern
Previous Job: Head coach at Sam Houston State
Career Record: 176-67-1 (21 years)

Georgia Southern is set to transition from the FCS ranks to the FBS level in 2014. The Eagles are losing a good coach in Jeff Monken, but Fritz is a proven winner at three different stops. After serving as an assistant at Coffeyville College and Sam Houston State from 1987-92, Fritz landed his first head coach gig at Blinn College in 1993. In four seasons, Fritz guided Blinn College to a 39-5-1 record. He coached at Central Missouri from 1997-2009 and accumulated a 97-47 mark. Fritz was hired at Sam Houston State in 2010 and guided the Bearkats to a 6-5 record in his first season, followed by three consecutive playoff appearances. Sam Houston State went 14-1 in 2011 and won 20 games from 2012-13. Fritz will have an interesting decision to make in terms of scheme. The Eagles ran the option under Monken, while Fritz used a spread at Sam Houston State. Transitioning to a different scheme will take time, but with Fritz’s strong track record, he should have Georgia Southern competitive right away in the Sun Belt.

Final Grade: B

12. Bob Diaco, Connecticut
Previous Job: Defensive coordinator at Notre Dame
Career Record: First Season

Every head coach hire is important for a program, but this one carries even bigger importance for Connecticut. With Louisville and Rutgers departing the American Athletic Conference, the Huskies have a chance to move up the ladder in the conference pecking order. Diaco has never been a head coach, but he has worked as an assistant on the college level since 1996. The New Jersey native played at Iowa and served as a graduate assistant with the Hawkeyes under Hayden Fry from 1996-97. After stops at Western Illinois, Eastern Michigan, Central Michigan and Western Michigan, Diaco had a three-year stint at Virginia and joined Brian Kelly’s staff at Cincinnati in 2009. Diaco followed Kelly to Notre Dame and spent the last four years as the Fighting Irish’s defensive coordinator. Only once during Diaco’s tenure did Notre Dame rank outside of the top 35 nationally in total defense. Diaco earned the Broyles Award in 2012, which is awarded to the top assistant in college football. It seems like a broken record this year, but this seems like a solid hire. Diaco’s staff was slightly underwhelming and the lack of had coaching experience is a concern. But after going the veteran route with its last hire, Connecticut went with a coach that’s young and energetic. Diaco has a lot to prove, but he should get the Huskies back into bowl games. 

Final Grade: B

13. Charlie Partridge, FAU
Previous Job: Defensive line coach at Arkansas
Career Record: First Season

Normally, we would frown on programs hiring a defensive line coach as a head coach, but this move seems like it will work for FAU. Partridge grew up less than an hour outside of Boca Raton, Fla., and is regarded for his connections on on the high school level in the Sunshine State. This is Partridge’s first chance to be a head coach, but he has stops as an assistant at Eastern Illinois, Pittsburgh, Wisconsin and Arkansas. Partridge appears to be going for a CEO approach in his first year, retaining coordinators Jovan Dewitt and Brian Wright from a team that went 6-6 despite the coaching turmoil that surrounded this team last season. The resume on Partridge is pretty thin. He doesn’t have head coach experience and has never been a coordinator. Experience in either position is generally an easier gauge for future success, but Partridge is a good hire for a program that is capable of winning a lot of games in Conference USA. If Partridge continues to bring in talent, the Owls will be one of C-USA’s top programs.

Final Grade: B-

14. Jeff Monken, Army
Previous Job: Head coach at Georgia Southern
Career Record: 38-16 (4 years)

Army has a rich history on the gridiron, but success has eluded this program in recent seasons. The Black Knights have only one winning season since 1997 and have not won more than four games since 2010. Rich Ellerson seemed like the perfect fit in West Point, but he was fired after a 20-41 record. Has Army developed into a job that’s just too tough to sustain success? Or has the program just missed on its last four head coaches? Monken comes to West Point with a background specializing in the option offense. He was an assistant under Paul Johnson at Georgia Southern from 1997-01, at Navy from 2002-07 and at Georgia Tech from 2008-09. Monken was hired as Georgia Southern’s head coach prior to the 2010 season and he guided the Eagles to 38 wins over the last four years. Georgia Southern is transitioning to the FBS level, so the program was ineligible to compete for a playoff spot in 2013. However, the Eagles defeated Florida 26-20 in their regular season finale. Monken doesn’t have a ton of head coaching experience and most of it came at a program (GSU) that has consistently been one of the most successful in the FCS ranks. Can he rebuild an Army program that has struggled to compete with Navy and Air Force? If he can, Monken’s background running the option and as an assistant at Navy should help Army turn the corner from bottom-feeder into a consistent bowl team.

Final Grade: B-

15. Chuck Martin, Miami (Ohio)
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at Notre Dame
Career Record: 74-7 (6 years)

From 1994-2005, Miami (Ohio) was one of the premier programs in the MAC. The RedHawks did not post a losing record during that stretch, won 13 games and the MAC title in 2003, made two bowl appearances and claimed the East Division title in 2004. But this program has fallen on hard times recently, winning just eight games over its last three years. Martin needs time to rebuild this program, but he appears to be the right coach for the job. He spent six years as the head coach at Grand Valley State after Brian Kelly left for Central Michigan. Martin amassed a 74-7 mark in six seasons, including a Division II title in 2005. In 2010, he reunited with Kelly, serving as the defensive backs coach for one season before moving to offensive coordinator in 2012. Instead of maintaining a program as Martin did at Grand Valley State, he will have a significant rebuilding project on his hands over the next few seasons.

Final Grade: B-

16. Blake Anderson, Arkansas State
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at North Carolina
Career Record: First Season

Arkansas State is no stranger to change, as Anderson will be the program’s fifth coach in five seasons. The athletic department deserves credit for finding and hiring successful coaches, but constant turnover is never a good idea. That cycle should stop in 2014, as Anderson has a $3 million buyout for the next two years. Arkansas State is one of the top programs in the remodeled Sun Belt, and Anderson’s arrival should keep this program in the mix for the conference title in 2014. Much like the last three coaches (Hugh Freeze, Gus Malzahn and Bryan Harsin), Anderson has an extensive background on offense. He spent the last two years as North Carolina’s offensive coordinator and worked under Larry Fedora at Southern Miss from 2008-11. Prior to his stint in Hattiesburg, Anderson served as the offensive coordinator at Louisiana-Lafayette in 2007, co-offensive coordinator at MTSU from 2002-04 and an assistant at New Mexico from 1999-01. The only knock on Anderson’s resume is a lack of head coaching experience.

Final Grade: B-

17. Mark Whipple, UMass
Previous Job: Quarterback coach with the Cleveland Browns (2012)
Career Record: 121-59 (16 years)

In order for UMass to be competitive on the FBS level in the future, it dipped into its past to replace Charley Molnar. Whipple returns to the sidelines in Amherst after a 10-year absence and is tasked with taking the Minutemen – a team in just its third season on the FBS level – to bowl and MAC title contention. Whipple was out of coaching in 2013, but there’s a lot to like about this hire. He was 49-26 in a six-year stint on the UMass sidelines from 1998-2003. Whipple guided the Minutemen to three FCS playoff appearances, including a national title in 1998. Prior to UMass, Whipple was a head coach at Brown (1994-97) and New Haven (1988-93). In 16 years as a head coach, Whipple has only two losing seasons. After leaving UMass in 2003, Whipple worked as a NFL assistant with the Steelers, Eagles and Browns, with a stint as Miami’s offensive coordinator from 2009-10. Although Whipple hasn’t been a head coach since 2003 and much has changed at UMass since, this is a solid hire for a program that has to get competitive in a hurry. Whipple’s background on offense will be a huge boost for a team that averaged only 281.6 yards per game last year. The Minutemen need time to recruit on the FBS level, but Whipple should help this team immediately be more competitive within the MAC in 2014.

Final Grade: B-

18. Bill Clark, UAB
Previous Job: Head coach at Jacksonville State
Career Record: 11-4 (1 year)
Garrick McGee’s resignation came as a surprise to most, but UAB quickly replaced the departed coach with someone who is quite familiar with football in the state of Alabama. Most of Clark’s experience as a coach has been on the high school level. The Alabama native started as an assistant at Piedmont High School in 1990 and stayed in that role until taking a similar position with Tuscaloosa High School in '92. Clark stayed on that path with stops as an assistant at three more high schools: Coffee County (Georgia), Dothan and Prattville. He was hired as South Alabama’s defensive coordinator in 2008 and served in that capacity until a one-year stint at Jacksonville State. Under Clark’s direction, South Alabama’s defense ranked No. 2 in the Sun Belt in fewest yards allowed per game in 2012. Clark’s first (and only) season as a collegiate head coach was a success, as Jacksonville State improved its win total by five games from 2012 to '13. Clark’s resume has a few holes. He doesn’t have any FBS head coaching experience and just one year at Jacksonville State isn’t enough to gauge his ability to lead a program for the long haul. But there are reasons to like this hire. Clark certainly has a few connections in the state from his days as a high school coach, and the Gamecocks made clear improvement under his watch. UAB is not an easy job. But Clark is a good hire for a program that should be able to win in Conference USA.
Final Grade: C+

19. Chris Creighton, Eastern Michigan
Previous Job: Head coach at Drake
Career Record: 139-46 (17 years)

Eastern Michigan is one of the – if not the No. 1 – toughest jobs for a head coach in college football. Success has been tough to find recently, as the Eagles have just one season above .500 since 1991. This program has played in only one bowl game (1987) and its last winning conference record occurred in 1995. Needless to say, Creighton won’t have it easy. But this is an intriguing, outside-the-box hire for Eastern Michigan. The California native has been a successful head coach at three different stops (Ottawa University, Wabash and Drake) and has never had a losing season. Creighton’s 139-46 career record is even more impressive when you consider his work at the previous three schools was done with non-scholarship players. Success will be tough for Creighton in 2014, and he needs time to recruit, but this hire looks like a solid fit for Eastern Michigan.  

Final Grade: C+

20. Jeff Brohm, Western Kentucky
Previous Job: Offensive coordinator at Western Kentucky
Career Record: First Season

By no means is this a bad hire for Western Kentucky. While Brohm ranks at the bottom of our new coach rankings for 2014, it’s more of a reflection on the depth of hires this offseason. Brohm has been a collegiate assistant since 2003 but this will be his first chance to be a head coach. He worked for five seasons as an assistant at Louisville from 2003-08 before spending time at FAU, Illinois and UAB. In Brohm’s one season in Birmingham, the Blazers finished fifth in Conference USA in total offense. After one year in Birmingham, Brohm joined Bobby Petrino’s staff at Western Kentucky and served as an assistant head coach. A lack of head coaching experience is always a concern, but this is a solid fit and hire for the Hilltoppers. Brohm grew up in Kentucky and has worked as an assistant at two other C-USA programs. One factor that should ease Brohm’s transition to head coach is a veteran staff, which includes former UAB coach Neil Callaway, defensive coordinator Nick Holt and secondary coach Mike Cassity.

Final Grade: C+

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