24 Notable Names Who Will Be Snubbed by the College Football Hall of Fame

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Chip Kelly, Howard Schnellenberger among those who could have trouble being enshrined

<p> Notable names who will be snubbed in the College Football Hall of Fame</p>

Tommie Frazier’s long wait for the College Football Hall of Fame ended Tuesday when the former Nebraska quarterback was inducted after his third year on the ballot.

That Frazier, who quarterbacked two national championship teams and finished second for the Heisman in 1995, waited three seasons was a mystery. But Frazier is in this year, along with Florida’s Danny Wuerffel, Wisconsin’s Ron Dayne, Ohio State’s Orlando Pace, Miami’s Vinny Testaverde and nine other players and coaches.

Other accomplished players and coaches will have a much more difficult time reaching Hall of Fame status, if at all.

The College Football Hall of Fame has criteria that will make it tough for a few notable names.

In all caps, the Hall says, “FIRST AND FOREMOST, A PLAYER MUST HAVE RECEIVED FIRST TEAM ALL-AMERICA RECOGNITION BY A SELECTOR RECOGNIZED BY THE NCAA AND UTILIZED TO COMPRISE THEIR CONSENSUS ALL-AMERICA TEAMS.”

In most modern cases, this is first-team recognition by the Associated Press, the Football Writers Association of America, the American Football Coaches Association, the Walter Camp Football Foundation and the Sporting News. And this makes sense. To be in the Hall of Fame, at least one service should deem a player to be the best at his position in one season, right?

Maybe not, All-America teams feature only one quarterback. Play in a season with one or two quarterbacks who stand above all others and it’s awfully tough to get that one first-team All-America nod. Players from non-traditional powers will also have a tough time meeting that criteria.

(Arizona State's Pat Tillman, who was not a first-team All-American by the major services, has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. A worthy exception to the rules.)

Coaches have their own requirements — 10 years and 100 games as a head coach with a .600 win percentage. Sure, a Hall of Fame coach should probably win better than 60 percent of his games, but not if he cut his teeth — and eventually won — at tough jobs.

These rules are — putting it kindly — problematic.

Names who will be snubbed in the College Football Hall of Fame

Jason Babin
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: The defensive end is the FBS career leader in tackles for a loss, and he’s second to Terrell Suggs in sacks. But he played at Western Michigan and topped out at second-team All-America honors from The Sporting News in 2003. Not that all mid-major stat sheet-stuffers are worthy of Hall of Fame inclusion, but Babin was a first-round pick who went on to be a two-time Pro Bowler.

Second-tier Big 12 quarterbacks
Why they don’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not first-team All-Americans
Why they should be in: Let’s name the names: Landry Jones, Chase Daniel and Collin Klein. Jones is the career-leading passer for the Big 12 and Oklahoma. Daniel was Heisman finalist who led his team to two Big 12 title games and the brink or the ’07 national championship game. Klein finished with 86 total touchdowns (56 rushing, 30 passing) and went 21-5 his last two seasons. The problem? Contemporaries like Robert Griffin, Andrew Luck, Johnny Manziel for Jones and Klein and Tim Tebow, Colt McCoy and Sam Bradford for Daniel relegated these quarterbacks to second-team status or lower.

Rich Brooks
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Win percentage
Why he should be in: Go ahead and be underwhelmed by Brooks’ career losing record (45.5 percent) in 290 games as a college coach, but go ask about him in Eugene and Lexington. Without Brooks, there’d be no Mike Bellotti or Chip Kelly at Oregon. In 1994, Brooks led Oregon to its first Rose Bowl since the 1919 season. And at Kentucky, he and Bear Bryant are the only coaches with four consecutive winning seasons.

Reggie Bush
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: “Citizenship”
Why he should be in: The Hall of Fame doesn’t forbid players who received NCAA sanctions to be enshrined, but it does say a player’s “post-football record as a citizen is also weighed.” On the field, Bush would be an easy pick for the Hall of Fame, but it may be tough for a player who had to return his Heisman to crack the College Football Hall of Fame.

Pete Carroll
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Too few seasons
Why he should be in: The criteria states a head coach must work for a minimum of 10 years. Carroll coached nine with seven consecutive top-five finishes, two national titles and five Rose Bowls.

Colin Kaepernick
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: Chris Ault -- who was already in the College Football Hall of Fame as an active coach -- invented the Pistol offense years earlier, but Kaepernick brought it to the masses as a collegian and a pro. He led Nevada to its best season as an FBS program while becoming the only quarterback to pass for 10,000 yards and rush for 4,000 yards in his career.

Case Keenum
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: Passing for 19,217 career yards at the Conference USA level wasn’t enough to make Keenum a first-team All-American among a loaded group of quarterbacks from 2007-11.

Jim Harbaugh and Chip Kelly
Why they don’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Too few games
Why they should be in: The two coaches defined the Pac-12 for the post-Pete Carroll era in divergent ways. Harbaugh’s physical, balanced teams produced two Heisman finalists (Andrew Luck and Toby Gerhart) and the best Stanford season since 1940. Kelly’s Oregon teams were the best at running the no-huddle spread on the way to three conference titles. The NFL came calling for both, meaning Kelly (53 career games) and Harbaugh (50 FBS games, plus 35 at FCS San Diego) don't meet the 10-year or 100-game requirement. Harbaugh, however, is eligible as a player.

Pat Hill and David Carr
Why they don’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Win percentage/not a first-team All-American
Why they should be in: Hill won 58.3 percent of his games at Fresno State, but it’s tough to imagine that program without him. The same could be said for Carr, a Heisman finalist who passed for 4,299 yards in 2001 when it wasn’t commonplace to have numbers like that.

June Jones and Colt Brennan
Why they don’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Win percentage/not a first-team All-American
Why they should be in: June Jones has been as successful as anyone running the Run and Shoot. Along the way, he’s revived two programs in trouble. Jones still holds the record for best single-season turning around, improving Hawaii from 0-12 to 9-4 in his first season there, eight years before taking Hawaii to the Sugar Bowl. Later, he became the first coach to take SMU to a bowl game since NCAA's death penalty. Hawaii's Brennan holds FBS records for touchdown passes in a season (58 in 2006), and career passing yards per game (387.9)

AJ McCarron
Why he might not meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: It’s worth including this active player because it’s conceivable McCarron could be the starting quarterback for three national-title winning teams and never be a first-team All-America quarterback thanks to dynamic contemporaries like Griffin, Manziel and more.
Ed. note: McCarron was named Walter Camp first-team All-American following the 2013 season, making him eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Joe Montana and Tony Rice
Why they don’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not first-team All-Americans
Why he should be in: Yes, Notre Dame players can be snubbed for awards. Rice was a Heisman finalist and a national-championship quarterback who happened to play at the same time as Andre Ware, Troy Aikman and Major Harris. Montana’s pro career, of course, overshadowed the time he finished eighth in the nation in passing in 1978.

Ray Rice
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: Rice’s best season coincided with consensus All-America mentions for Arkansas’s Darren McFadden and UCF’s Kevin Smith. Rice has two of the top four single-season rushing totals in Big East history and his the second-leading rusher in the history of the league with 4,926 yards. He was the top player on the best Rutgers team in program history.

Howard Schnellenberger
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Win percentage
Why he should be in: In his 277-game career, Schnellenberger gets penalized for taking over hopeless college jobs at Miami and Louisville, plus building Florida Atlantic from the ground up. That makes him the architect of three programs. He led Miami to its first national title in 1983 and Louisville to the Fiesta Bowl in 1990. All that time at tough jobs causes him to fall short of the win percentage requirement (51.4 percent). Even if Schnellenberger retired in 1994 before a 5-5-1 season at Oklahoma and a 41-56 run at fledgling FAU, he still would fall short of the 60-percent mark (56.2 percent at Miami and Louisville).

Joe Tiller
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Win percentage
Why he should be in: Tiller brought the spread to the Big Ten and made Purdue relevant along the way. The Boilermakers endured 12 consecutive losing seasons before he was hired and reached the Rose Bowl (albeit with an 8-4 record) by his fourth season). He went to bowl games in 10 of 12 seasons at Purdue, but finished his career with a 57.8 win percentage in Lafayette and at Wyoming. It’s worth noting Tiller’s best quarterback, Drew Brees, also doesn’t meet Hall of Fame criteria by never being a first-team All-America selection.

Michael Turner and Garrett Wolfe
Why they doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not first-team All-Americans
Why he should be in: Wolfe (5,164) and Turner (4,941) are the MAC’s No. 1 and 2 career rushers, but playing for Northern Illinois made it tough to crack All-America teams. Turner was a Sporting News second-team selection in 2003, and Wolfe was an AP third-teamer in 2006.

Pat White
Why he doesn’t meet the Hall of Fame’s criteria: Not a first-team All-American
Why he should be in: Noticing a trend with quarterbacks circa 2006-08? There were a lot of good ones, and White ends up getting squeezed out. He was the most successful West Virginia quarterback since Major Harris, he became the first quarterback to start and win four bowl games, and he holds the record for career rushing yards for a quarterback (4,480).

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