Offensive Coordinator Lane Kiffin's Alabama Debut, Reviewed

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Kiffin's role as the Tide's offensive boss always a lively topic

Offensive Coordinator Lane Kiffins Alabama Debut, Reviewed

ATLANTA — The Lane Kiffin-as-Alabama-offensive-coordinator is one game old, so let’s review it, shall we?

Of course this is way too early for a referendum on the most compelling assistant coaching hire in the SEC, but Week 1 is perfect for overreaction — one way or another.

And, wow, did Kiffin and Alabama coach Nick Saban give us plenty of fodder.

From the cheap seats:

Many offensive coordinators like to work in the press box with the ability to see the whole field.

Kiffin, however, worked from the sideline in his first game with the Tide. Saban wanted his first-year coordinator to be able to talk directly to his first-time starting quarterback rather than talk to him on the phone.

 

The Alabama head coach can bar his assistants from talking to the media, he can try to control the messaging, but he can’t control the body language of two — let’s say, expressive — coaches on the sideline.
 

 


From Nick Saban:

Not surprisingly, Saban isn’t thrilled talking about Kiffin in a way he never had to talk about former coordinators Jim McElwain or Doug Nussmeier.

The implication from reporters — at least as Saban sees it — is that Saban hired a dud of an offensive coordinator.

“You know, the guy is a really good coach now, all right,” Saban said. “Y’all need to ‘fess up to that.

“And most places than don’t like him is because he left, and they were mad because he left. They weren’t mad about anything he did while he was there. Just do a little research on that.”

In the interest of research, the Oakland Raiders and USC may disagree on being “mad” about his departure. Saban’s right about Tennessee, though.

From the field:

This is what matters, right? After a quarterback competition that lasted until Friday — that’s when Blake Sims learned he’d start ahead of Florida State transfer Jacob Coker — Alabama put up 538 yards, 6.6 yards per play.

Granted, many coordinators could thrive with running backs like Derrick Henry and T.J. Yeldon and wide receivers like Amari Cooper and DeAndrew White.

The key moment, though, may have been the second quarter.

Tied at 10, Sims was rattled at the line. Saban said his quarterback called the wrong plays, called incorrect formations in the huddle and took too much time on the play clock. Saban told Coker to warm up.

Instead of making a switch, Saban told Kiffin to switch to a no-huddle look of its own.

“When we did that, he sort of got it back together and then he was fine after that,” Saban said.
 
True, the decision to go no-huddle may have been Saban’s call, but adding the up-tempo to the arsenal was part of the reason he hired Kiffin in the first place.

 

Could the no-huddle be a more regular part of Alabama’s plans? If Sims remains the quarterback, that seems possible.

He finished 24-of-33 for 250 yards with an interception and made plays on the move against Alabama in part of the no-huddle.

However, the no-huddle has become so prevalent that Alabama’s base pro-style offense is more of the outlier, even in the SEC.

“We’re one of the few teams in the world that still plays with regular people — a tight end, two backs and two wideouts,” Saban said. “And now we’re like the dinosaur age when it comes to that.”

Kiffin comes from the same background, but he’s incorporated elements of the hurry-up. If Alabama can change tempos on a dime — and as effectively as it did against West Virginia — the Kiffin hire may be a stroke of genius for a program that already has one of the top rosters in the country.

“People really have a tough time defending what we do because nobody does it, and it does allow us to to be more physical and it does allow us to play more players,” Saban said. "But we’ll certainly consider (the no-huddle). We have the capabilities of doing it.”

 

 

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