Who Leads the Big Ten in Rushing in 2014?

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Melvin Gordon leads the way for Wisconsin's ground attack.

Who Leads the Big Ten in Rushing in 2014?

The Big Ten produced seven 1,000-yard rushers last season, headlined by Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah with 1,690 yards on 281 attempts. Abdullah was joined in the 1,000-yard club by Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon and James White, Ohio State’s Carlos Hyde and Braxton Miller, Michigan State’s Jeremy Langford and Minnesota’s David Cobb.

Hyde and White expired their eligibility, but the race to be the Big Ten’s leading rusher should be a tight battle once again in 2014.

Abdullah is the default favorite after leading the league in rushing last season, but Gordon and Langford are expected to improve on their totals in 2014.

Gordon shared time with White last season, but the Badgers are expected to give Gordon more carries this year with White expiring his eligibility. Corey Clement should pickup some of White’s workload after averaging 8.2 yards per carry last year. However, Gordon could increase his attempts to 275-300 as the Badgers look to lean on a solid rushing attack and one of the nation’s best offensive lines.

Athlon Sports’ preseason magazines are set to hit the newsstands in late May/early June, and it’s time to settle some of the biggest debates for 2014. Over the next few weeks, AthlonSports.com will dive into some of the key topics by conference and some of the debates that will shape preseason predictions for this year.

Who Leads the Big Ten in Rushing in 2014?

Steven Lassan (@AthlonSteven)
This seems like a two-man battle between Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah and Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon. Both players should be All-American selections for 2014 and two of the top running backs in the nation. But with that being said, I like Gordon to edge Abdullah in the final rushing tally of the season. Gordon finished second in the Big Ten last year, recording 1,609 yards to Abdullah’s 1,690. Gordon has room for his total to increase, as he had 75 less carries than Abdullah in 2013. Also, Gordon produced more big plays last season, recording nine carries over 30 yards, six over 40 yards and four over 50. All of those numbers were better than Abdullah, and Gordon should add to those totals with more carries in 2014. Corey Clement is a capable No. 2 in Wisconsin, but Gordon should approach 275 carries, which will allow the junior to make a push for 2,000 rushing yards in 2014.

Brent Yarina, (@BTNBrentYarina), BTN.com Senior Editor
I love Indiana’s Tevin Coleman this season, but it’s hard to go that bold when last year’s leading rushers, Ameer Abdullah and Melvin Gordon, return. So, to answer the question, I’ll take Gordon, the guy who finished 81 yards behind Abdullah for the 2013 lead. Gordon is the ideal mix of speed and power, and he’s a back who absolutely shreds average defenses – to be fair, at 7.8 yards per carry, he was pretty strong against all comers. Whatever the case, Gordon doesn’t face Michigan State, the Big Ten’s expected top defense, or Ohio State, an annual run-stuffer, while he does draw Illinois and Purdue, units that finished outside the top 100 against the rush. Another reason to like Gordon: James White is out of the picture, which should yield more opportunities. 

Braden Gall (@BradenGall)
Despite the loss of Carlos Hyde and James White, the Big Ten is still loaded with elite ball-carriers. The Spartans Jeremy Langford plays for the defending champs and was arguably the most important back in conference play a year ago. Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon is the most physically talented player at his position in the league. Northwestern welcomes back do-everything dynamo Venric Mark after he missed all of last year. And Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah actually led the league in rushing a year ago and is back in Lincoln. Needless to say, the Big Ten is stacked at the position entering a critical first season in the playoff. But with one of the nation's top offensive lines returning and no James White to steal 200 carries, I have to go with the Badgers Melvin Gordon. He is the most explosive back in the league and has the best supporting cast returning up front. He proved he can score from anywhere on the field at anytime by averaging nearly eight yards per carry (209 att.). Now, he is now the true featured back in an always run-heavy UW offense.

Kevin McGuire, (@KevinonCFB), CrystalBallRun.com and CollegeFootballTalk.com
If there is one thing we know about Wisconsin, it is the Badgers are going to thrive running the football. That will absolutely be the case once again in 2014 with Melvin Gordon leading the way on the ground. Gordon led the Badgers with 1,609 rushing yards and paired that with 12 touchdowns in a dynamic duo with James White. With White gone, the bulk of the carries will be put in Gordon’s hands behind an offensive line that returns four starters. The carries will be there for Gordon, as will the protection. The schedule certainly helps as well, after facing LSU in the season opener at least. Five of Wisconsin’s new division opponents finished in the bottom half of the Big Ten in rushing defense in 2013.

Mark Ross
Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon and Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah, third and first in the Big Ten in rushing last season respectively, certainly have to be considered the frontrunners to repeat their success in 2013. However, I'm going to go a slightly different direction and say Northwestern's Venric Mark will top them both. To start with, Mark rushed for 1,366 yards in 2012 when he was considered one of the conference's top playmakers. Injuries limited him to just three games last year because of injury, but he is reported to be back to health and should resume his role as the Wildcats' top ball-carrier. Additionally, all five starting offensive linemen return from a unit that paved the way for 172.4 rushing yards per game and Tervor Siemian, a more traditional drop-back passer, replaces dual-threat Kain Colter as the starting quarterback. When Mark ran for 1,366 yards two seasons ago, he did so on 226 carries (17.4 per game) while Colter had 169 rushing attempts. Combine those two factors with a schedule that includes porous rushing defenses like Purdue, Illinois, California and Northern Illinois and, perhaps more importantly, does not include Michigan State or Ohio State, and I like Mark's chances of putting together a big senior season. Provided he stays healthy and gets at least 20 carries a game, I think Mark could leave his on the Big Ten and lead the league, which does not lack for quality running backs, in rushing.

David Fox (@DavidFox615)
This may be crazy, considering Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah led the league in rushing last year and Wisconsin backs are pretty much a sure thing. I’m going to pick Michigan State’s Jeremy Langford. He finished last season as consistent a runner as any back in the country, rushing for at least 100 yards in the final eight games before the Rose Bowl (he rushed for 84 against Stanford). He also topped 20 carries in every game since Oct. 12. As much as Abdullah will be productive, he’s going to be under more pressure this season than last when he had a Big Ten-high 21.6 carries per game. Langford was right behind at 20.9, but I like quarterback Connor Cook and a deep group of backup running backs to keep Langford fresh and the offense more varied. Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon is probably the favorite since he topped 1,609 yards last season with James White in his backfield, but Corey Clement will be a worthy No. 2 to the Badgers’ top tailback.

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