Two QBs, four questions

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Athlon editors analyze March's two-quarterback fantasy mock draft

Athlon editors analyze March's two-quarterback fantasy mock draft

The editors at Athlon Sports just completed the second mock fantasy football draft of 2011. Yes, we know it's March and fantasy football is months away, but is there ever a need to stop thinking about fantasy football?

In last month's draft we went with Athlon's default lineup, default scoring and a 12-team league. This month's draft was setup as a 10-team league with two quarterbacks in the starting lineup and four points for a passing touchdown instead of our default of six.

With this being a two-quarterback league — not necessarily the fantasy standard — we answer some of the strategies that you can implore if you find yourself in one of these leagues.

There may be plenty of other strategy questions you have about a two-quarterback league, so don't hesitate to hit us up on our Twitter accounts for the answers you're looking for.

Is there any pressure in your mind when it comes to picking No. 1 overall in a two-quarterback league or is it clear-cut that Aaron Rodgers goes No. 1 in this format?

Steven Lassan @AthlonSteven on Twitter
Absolutely, there is a lot of pressure. In a two-quarterback league, I think the clear No. 1 pick is Aaron Rodgers. However, some may choose to go traditional and take a running back. If the person drafting at No. 1 chooses to go with a running back, the run on quarterbacks may get pushed further down the first round. If the person drafting at No. 1 goes with a quarterback, you can bet the rest of the league is going to follow suit. Although you can still win a league by passing on a quarterback with the first overall pick, I’d feel good about my team if I took Rodgers at No. 1, then came back and took Darren McFadden with my second pick. With the running back class pretty deep at the top, going with Rodgers No. 1 in a two-quarterback league is the way to go.

Patrick Snow @AthlonSnowman on Twitter
You have to expect other players will draft the elite quarterbacks quickly in a 2-QB format. If you don’t get the best one at No. 1, then you must be comfortable with both of your signal callers coming from the 7-15 area of the QB rankings. I would prefer to take the elite quarterback with the first draft choice so I know that one (if not both) of my guys at that position will be a stud. If you’re good with some of the mid-tier QBs, then go ahead and get the top running back.

Braden Gall @AthlonBraden on Twitter
It does not matter how many wide receivers or quarterbacks are in your starting roster, a fantasy championship, like the real ones, are still won with a great running game. I would debate Adrian Peterson, the single most talented running back on the planet, against Rodgers. If you think landing Matt Ryan and Big Ben on the turn in rounds two and three works for you, then go with A.D. (For the record, I am from Wisconsin, and in our two-QB league, I took A-Rodg with the first overall pick.)

Nathan Rush
I don't know if A-Rodg has to go No. 1 overall; I would have debated taking Tom Brady with the top pick. But I do think the elite QBs should dominate the first two rounds of a league with two QBs in the starting lineup.

Corby Yarbrough @AthlonCorby on Twitter
There are a few things in play in my mind. First, with it being four points for a touchdown pass might give me pause. Second, a stud running back is hard to find. But third is the fact that there is no clear-cut top running back in my mind. With a two-quarterback league and picking first you pretty much HAVE to take a QB. Just projecting that every team will at least select one QB with one of their first two picks would leave you with an Eli Manning or Joe Flacco type when it gets back to you at 20th. So I did not even blink when it came to making Rodgers the No. 1 pick overall.

If you are picking in the second half of the first round do you go QB-QB to start the draft no matter what?

Steven Lassan @AthlonSteven on Twitter
If you miss out on one of the elite fantasy signal-callers – Rodgers, Brees, Brady, Manning – then I’d consider going with a running back or receiver with my first pick. Michael Vick and Philip Rivers are solid fantasy options, but getting Adrian Peterson, Arian Foster or Andre Johnson is still an excellent foundation to build around. I don’t think going QB-QB is a necessity in the second half of the first round, but I’d be sure to grab at least one in my first three picks.

Patrick Snow @AthlonSnowman on Twitter
No. I don’t believe you need to be locked into a QB-QB mindset at any time. That’s especially true at the back end of the first round. The value at that point will tend to be with getting a top running back or receiver along with an elite quarterback as your first two selections.

Braden Gall @AthlonBraden on Twitter
I adamantly disagree with the QB-QB strategy. Matt Cassel, Matt Ryan, Josh Freeman and Michael Vick all finished 2010 as top ten fantasy signal callers. Do you think those names were selected in the first six rounds — much less with someone's first two picks? You can find plenty of value.

Nathan Rush
In the back half of the first round, I would go after the Chris Johnsons and Adrian Petersons of the world. Go ahead and lock up one of the top two or three RBs, then in the second round take a QB. You’ll probably be picking between the same QBs early in the second round, as you would have late in the first. Elite, workhorse runners are nearly extinct; there are plenty of mid-level passers to choose from once the Rodgers, Brady, Manning, Rivers, Brees crew is off the board.

Corby Yarbrough @AthlonCorby on Twitter
I don’t think that would be a solid strategy. You have to figure the cream of the crop QBs will be gone by then, but that also means you could clean up on running back or get a top-tier RB and a top-three receiver then go with your first QB in the third round. I don’t think you could afford to wait past the third round to at least get secure your first QB, however.

What is your strategy when it comes to picking a third quarterback? Do you do it or do you take the other talent that is out there and take your chances on spot starting twice during the season?

Steven Lassan @AthlonSteven on Twitter
I think getting a third quarterback is a must in this league setup. Even if you are set with Aaron Rodgers and Tony Romo as your starting quarterbacks, an injury to either could knock your team out of the playoffs if you don’t have a capable backup. I’m sure there will be a few options on the waiver wire, but I’d rather backup my two starters with a legitimate every-week fantasy option. I’d feel a lot better about my team if I had Rodgers and Romo with a backup like Jay Cutler, as opposed to a Chad Henne or Ryan Fitzpatrick.

Patrick Snow @AthlonSnowman on Twitter
If you feel like both of your quarterbacks will be consistent producers throughout the season, then do not worry about a third QB until near the end of the draft. However if there are concerns with injury and/or consistency with your second signal caller, then you will want to draft a third one fairly soon after that second QB.

Braden Gall @AthlonBraden on Twitter
My third QB strategy all depends on how my first two were selected. If I went early (-ier) on my first and second quarterbacks, then I would hold off on a late round flier. If I have Peyton Manning and Big Ben, I have no need for a quality back-up. If my two starters are Matt Schaub and Josh Freeman, you can bet I am going early on a third with either plenty of upside or plenty of dependability.

Nathan Rush
It all depends on the strength of the first two QBs. Anything can happen, but history says Peyton Manning will play 16 games, while Matthew Stafford is likely to miss a chunk of the season. Most fantasy-quality quarterbacks fall somewhere between the two former No. 1 overall NFL Draft picks. If one of my two starters is a "sure thing" like Manning or Brady, I'd be less concerned with drafting a third QB. But if I have two second-tier guys or young guns, I think it's wise to take a third QB sooner rather than later.

Corby Yarbrough @AthlonCorby on Twitter
I would say a lot of it depends on where you draft. Take me for example picking No. 1, I went with Rodgers at No. 1 overall and then held out until the fourth round to grab Josh Freeman, who should have a stellar 2011. With two 300-plus point scoring QBs already on my roster, I am probably going to wait and wait and wait, grab other talent and see who might be leftover. Bye weeks will certainly affect this strategy once you know the schedule, but I would be inclined to stockpile other talent and either make a trade or take my chances with two spot starts. Keep in mind, in a 10-team league, even if everyone drafts three QBs there are still two starters out there. There is also this to think about: You could pick a third QB just to hoard and use as trade bait later — namely after he has already helped you during one of your bye weeks.

If you were to play in a league like this where it’s already setup that QB is the position to have, would you set it up as a 4-point per passing TD league or a 6-point per passing TD league?

Steven Lassan @AthlonSteven on Twitter
I understand the concept that touchdowns are worth six points on the field and how some want that reflected in fantasy. However, with two quarterbacks in the starting lineup, it’s already leaned heavily to the players under center. Having a four-point per passing touchdown league doesn’t completely eliminate the edge quarterbacks have, but at least balances the scoring out a bit. You still need good running backs and receivers to win the league, but quarterbacks will likely post the most touchdowns every year and four points a passing score helps to level the scoring.

Patrick Snow @AthlonSnowman on Twitter
I always prefer six points per touchdown in any league. The logic for the four-point argument is flawed. I’ve never been concerned with quarterbacks “being overvalued”; I think they are pretty important when it comes to actual football.

Braden Gall @AthlonBraden on Twitter
A touchdown is a touchdown is a touchdown. Everyone who has ever scored a touchdown in real life has received six points. That being said, the only time I would even think about tweaking the scoring would be a two-quarterback set-up. It really comes down to fantasy philosophy. Do you want things to be nice and even and tidy? Or do you want your league to represent reality? The pass is almost always more difficult than the catch — there is a reason quarterbacks are selected No. 1 overall and paid the most money. I usually go with six points — everyone has to deal with the same circumstances no matter the scoring system.

Nathan Rush
All touchdowns are created equal in my fantasy world. Six points per passing TD, without a doubt.

Corby Yarbrough @AthlonCorby on Twitter
All TDs are six points in the real world as well as my pretend world of fantasy football.

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