CFB Fantasy: Big 12 Fantasy WRs

Big 12 Fantasy WRs

Two Right Sidebar Images

Athlon continues its 2010 college fantasy draft kit with a look at Big 12 wide receivers.

Big 12 Fantasy Wide Receiver Rankings and Profiles

Fantasy points based upon standard scoring system – passing touchdowns = 4 pts, rushing touchdowns = 6 pts, 25 passing yards = 1 point, 10 rush/receiving yards = 1 point, receptions = 0.5 points, 2 point conversions = 2 points

1. Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma (JR) – Bye Week – 6
Despite losing quarterback Sam Bradford for most of last season, the Sooners maintained a high-powered passing attack. Landry Jones assumed the starting job once Bradford was injured and gained valuable experience for 2010, along with developing a nice rapport with Broyles. In each of the final seven games of last season, Broyles caught at least eight passes and posted a career-high 156 yards in the Sun Bowl win over Stanford.

Athlon’s Take: There’s little doubt Broyles is one of the top five fantasy options at receiver this season. Considering the connection Jones and Broyles established at the end of last season, catching 100 passes and 15-18 touchdowns is a reasonable projection.

2009 stats: 224.9 fantasy points
Receiving: 89 rec., 1,120 yds., 15 TDs
Rushing: 83 yds., 1 TD

2. Jeff Fuller, Texas A&M (JR) – Bye Week – 4
Injuries derailed Fuller’s 2009 campaign, suffering a broken leg in the second week of the season and missing the next four contests. Although it took some time for Fuller to knock the rust off once he was back in the lineup, he once again emerged as Jerrod Johnson’s favorite target.

Athlon’s Take: If Fuller is able to stay healthy this year, look for the junior to post the best numbers of his career. Catching 70 passes for 1,000 yards and 10 scores is a reasonable projection, making Fuller one of the first 10 receivers off the board in upcoming fantasy drafts.

2009 stats: 105.6 fantasy points
Receiving: 41 rec., 568 yds., 7 TDs
Rushing: none

3. Jerrell Jackson, Missouri (JR) – Bye Week – 5
When Jared Perry was injured late last season, Jackson emerged as a steady option for quarterback Blaine Gabbert. In Missouri’s last three regular season games, Jackson nabbed 19 receptions for 274 yards and one score. With the departure of Danario Alexander and Perry, Jackson and Wes Kemp will contend to be the No. 1 receiver for Gabbert and a top-30 fantasy option at receiver.

Athlon’s Take: Fantasy owners will have a tough decision to make on draft day. There’s no doubt Missouri is going to have an explosive offense, but is it Jackson or Kemp that will emerge as the best fantasy option? Even though Kemp will make plenty of big plays, Jackson is a safe pick for at least 50 receptions and six scores.

2009 stats: 91.5 fantasy points
Receiving: 37 rec., 458 yds., 2 TDs
Rushing: 92 yds., 1 TD

4. Detron Lewis, Texas Tech (SR) – Bye Week – 4
Lewis and Alex Torres posted similar stat lines last season and both are expected to be key players in the receiving corps this season. Lewis led the team in yards and tied with Torres for second on the team in touchdown receptions. New coordinator Neal Brown wants to attack downfield more, which should give Lewis a bump in fantasy value.

Athlon’s Take: Deciding between Torres and Lewis will be a difficult call on draft day. Both figure to have similar numbers, but it’s still anyone’s guess if one will emerge as a clear No. 1. Although both players figure to post solid numbers, go with Lewis as the team’s top fantasy receiver.

2009 stats: 132.8 fantasy points
Receiving: 65 rec., 844 yds., 6 TDs
Rushing: 3 yds.

5. Hubert Anyiam, Oklahoma State (JR) – Bye Week – 4
Anyiam was forced to step into a difficult position last year when Dez Bryant was lost for the season due to ineligibility. Losing Bryant was a huge blow to Oklahoma State’s passing attack, but Anyiam proved to be a reliable option, catching 42 passes for 515 yards and three scores.

Athlon’s Take: Anyiam needs to show more consistency from week-to-week, but is Oklahoma State’s top returning receiver. With the hire of Dana Holgorsen as offensive coordinator and more emphasis on throwing the ball, Anyiam’s value is on the rise. Anyiam should easily surpass his numbers from last season, but expect the Cowboys to spread out the catches among the other options in the receiving corps.

2009 stats: 89.7 fantasy points
Receiving: 42 rec., 515 yds., 3 TDs
Rushing: 13 yds.

6. Alex Torres, Texas Tech (SO) – Bye Week – 4
Torres generated a lot of buzz with his play in preseason practices and didn’t disappoint owners who took a gamble on him in fall drafts. Torres finished as Texas Tech’s leader in receptions and tied for second in touchdown catches. Torres posted two 100-yard efforts, including a career-high 163 yards against Oklahoma. 

Athlon’s Take: Fantasy owners will certainly have their eyes on Texas Tech this year. Mike Leach is no longer around, but the offense is expected to remain high-powered with the hire of Neal Brown (Troy) as offensive coordinator. The Red Raiders have a deep collection of receivers, likely preventing one from emerging as a clear No. 1 option. However, Torres is a steady performer who warrants consideration as a WR3 in 120 formats.

2009 stats: 147.6 fantasy points
Receiving: 67 rec., 806 yds., 6 TDs
Rushing: none

7. Kendall Wright, Baylor (JR) – Bye Week – 13
Baylor’s bowl hopes and offensive firepower were dashed when quarterback Robert Griffin suffered an ACL injury in the third game of the season. With Griffin out, the Bears were forced to go with freshman Nick Florence for most of the season. Although Florence wasn’t awful, the Bears certainly missed Griffin’s playmaking ability and expected improvement in the passing attack. Despite the loss of Griffin, Wright managed to post respectable catch and yardage totals. However, scoring touchdowns was a challenge, with his only scores coming in two games.

Athlon’s Take: With Griffin back under center, the Bears should be better on offense this season. The Bears lose their No. 2 and No. 3 statistical receivers from last season, leaving even more opportunities for Wright. If Wright can find the endzone a few more times in 2010, look for the junior to emerge as a weekly starter in 120 formats.

2009 stats: 145.6 fantasy points
Receiving: 66 rec., 740 yds., 4 TDs
Rushing: 132 yds., 1 TD

8. Wes Kemp, Missouri (JR) – Bye Week – 5
With Danario Alexander and Jared Perry out of eligibility, it’s Kemp’s time to shine in Columbia. Kemp has just 24 career receptions, but offers intriguing size at 6-foot-4 and averaged an impressive 18.2 yards per catch last season. The junior has yet to record a 100-yard effort or more than four receptions in a game, but expect those marks to fall in 2010.

Athlon’s Take: If you are looking for a low-risk, high-reward pick in fall drafts, Kemp is your type of player. Missouri quarterback Blaine Gabbert could throw for 30 touchdowns this year and those scores have to go somewhere. Jerrell Jackson may be more reliable, but Kemp will provide plenty of big plays.

2009 stats: 61.7 fantasy points
Receiving: 23 rec., 418 yds., 3 TDs
Rushing: none

9. Scotty McKnight, Colorado (SR) – Bye Week – 4
McKnight was quietly a solid fantasy option last season, finishing as the No. 37 ranked fantasy receiver. With the quarterback struggles and Colorado’s losing record, McKnight was often overlooked in the fantasy world, but recorded four 100-yard efforts and caught at least seven passes in seven contests last year.

Athlon’s Take: Even if Colorado struggles to improve its passing attack in 2010, McKnight should remain a 70-80 catch option. The Buffaloes lost Markques Simas to off the field issues, which should open the door for McKnight and Michigan transfer Toney Clemons to have more opportunities for catches. Don’t be scared away by Colorado’s sluggish offense on draft day, select McKnight as a solid WR3 or WR4.

2009 stats: 169.5 fantasy points
Receiving: 76 rec., 893 yds., 6 TDs
Rushing: 2 yds., 1 TD

10. Uzoma Nwachukwu, Texas A&M (SO) – Bye Week – 4
An injury to Jeff Fuller opened the door for Nwachukwu to see a major role as a freshman last season. Nwachukwu announced his presence on the college scene, catching three passes – all for touchdowns – against Utah State. Despite his huge effort in the second game of the season, Nwachukwu managed to reach the endzone only three more times the rest of the way.

Athlon’s Take: Nwachukwu’s fantasy value could be largely dependent on how Texas A&M uses Ryan Tannehill. If Tannehill sees significant snaps at receiver, Nwachukwu’s time on the field could decrease. However, the early indication is Tannehill will spend most of this season strictly preparing as a backup to quarterback Jerrod Johnson. Nwachukwu won’t outperform Fuller, but is a solid option to monitor for select matchups.

2009 stats: 136.3 fantasy points
Receiving: 40 rec., 708 yds., 6 TDs
Rushing: 87 yds., 1 TD

11. Malcolm Williams, Texas (JR) – Bye Week – 6
The hype surrounding Williams hasn’t matched his production on the field. As a freshman in 2008, Williams caught 17 passes for 304 yards and three scores and was expected to take on a larger role in the offense last year. However, Williams was a pedestrian fantasy pick in 120 formats, mustering just two games of 100 or more receiving yards.

Athlon’s Take: Williams certainly has the talent, but can he put it all together in 2010? Jordan Shipley is no longer around to catch passes, leaving the door open for Williams to become the new go-to receiver in Austin. The Longhorns want to pass less in 2010, but Williams is a low-risk, high-reward candidate in all fantasy formats this year.

2009 stats: 78.9 fantasy points
Receiving: 39 rec., 550 yds., 2 TDs
Rushing: none

12. Niles Paul, Nebraska (SR) – Bye Week – 5
Nebraska struggled with its passing game last season, but Paul emerged as one of the top all-around playmakers in the Big 12. Paul managed four efforts of 100 yards or more and scored on one punt return last season. The Cornhuskers are expected to make a few scheme changes on offense this year and the quarterback battle is open entering fall practice, looking to find any improvement in the passing department.

Athlon’s Take: Paul isn’t going to post 80 or 90 catches this year, but as the clear No. 1 option on an offense that should be better, an increase in fantasy value is expected. Look for Paul to approach 50-60 receptions with 800 yards and five to seven scores.

2009 stats: 119.4 fantasy points
Receiving: 40 rec., 796 yds., 4 TDs
Rushing: 48 yds., 1 TD

13. James Kirkendoll, Texas (SR)
14. DeJuan Miller, Oklahoma (JR)
15. Johnathan Wilson, Kansas
16. Darius Darks, Iowa State
17. Chris Harper, Kansas State
18. Toney Clemons, Colorado (JR)
19. Josh Cooper, Oklahoma State (JR)
20. Ryan Tannehill, Texas A&M (JR)
21. Lyle Leong, Texas Tech (SR)
22. Marquise Goodwin, Texas (SO)
23. Kenny Stills, Oklahoma (FR)
24. Aubrey Quarles, Kansas State (SR)
25. Ryan Swope, Texas A&M (SO)
26. Tracy Moore, Oklahoma State (SO)
27. Rolandis Woodland, Missouri (SO)
28. Bradley McDougald, Kansas (SO)
29. Darius Reynolds, Iowa State (JR)
30. Lanear Sampson, Baylor (SO)
31. Tramain Swindall, Texas Tech (JR)
32. Mike McNeill, Nebraska (SR)
33. Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State (SO)
34. John Chiles, Texas (SR)
35. Jaz Reynolds, Oklahoma (SO)
36. Brodrick Smith, Kansas State (SO)
37. Darius White, Texas (FR)
38. Josh Gordon, Baylor (SO)
39. Daymond Patterson, Kansas (JR)
40. Terrence McCoy, Texas A&M (SR)
41. Curenski Gilleylen, Nebraska (SO)
42. Brandon Caleb, Oklahoma (SR)
43. Jake Williams, Iowa State (SR)
44. D.J. Monroe, Texas (SO)
45. Terrance Williams, Baylor (SO)
46. Adrian Hilburn, Kansas State (SR)
47. Brandal Jackson, Texas A&M (SO)
48. Cameron Kenney, Oklahoma (SR)
49. Sedrick Johnson, Iowa State (JR)
50. Jason Espinoza, Colorado (JR)
51. Eric Ward, Texas Tech (FR)
52. T.J. Moe, Missouri (SO)
53. Eddie Johnson, Baylor (FR)
54. Khiry Cooper, Nebraska (SO)
55. Josh Lenz, Iowa State (SO)
56. Austin Zouzalik, Texas Tech (SO)
57. Rod Harris, Kansas (JR)
58. Mossis Madu, Oklahoma (SR)
59. Kevin Johnson, Oklahoma State (FR)
60. Albert Gary, Iowa State (FR)

Follow us at Twitter: AthlonSteven

More Stories:

Home Page Infinite Scroll Left