Mariano Rivera to Retire?

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Will 2012 be the last season for 42-year-old New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera?

<p> Will 2012 be the last season for 42-year-old New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera?</p>

Yesterday everyone was asking, “When will Mariano Rivera arrive?” Today the question has become, “When will Mariano Rivera leave?”

Apparently, the iconic Panamanian closer whose entrance music is Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” has been working on his exit strategy.

After showing up to Spring Training in Tampa, Fla., one day after all other New York Yankees pitchers and catchers, Rivera hinted that the 2012 season could be his last. The seemingly ageless 42-year-old is aiming to avoid a rocking chair tour, however, and isn’t ready to let the rest of the world in on his retirement plans — at least no time soon.

“I know now,” said Rivera. “I just don’t want to tell you. I know now. I will let you guys know when I think I should tell you.”

Rivera broke into the big leagues as a 25-year-old starting pitcher in 1995 before transitioning to the bullpen as the setup man for All-Star closer John Wetteland on the 1996 World Series champions — a team that had current manager Joe Girardi at catcher and 22-year-old Rookie of the Year Derek Jeter at shortstop.

In 1997, Rivera became the Yankees’ closer, a job he has held onto with a cutter grip for 15 seasons, redefining what it means to be a ninth-inning man. In the process, Rivera set the all-time saves record — which stands at 603 and counting. But just how many more 27th final game-winning outs does MLB’s last remaining No. 42 have left in his right arm?

Fresh off another unbelievably productive season — Rivera had a 1.91 ERA, 0.897 WHIP, 44 saves and 60 strikeouts in 61.1 innings in 2011 — there are no signs of slippage. But Super Mariano is in the final season of a two-year, $30 million deal and, even if his staggeringly consistent results remain at the usual All-Star level in 2012, Rivera can’t pitch forever — nor does he want to.

“I have my church, my family,” said Rivera. “I’ve been blessed in amazing ways. I’ve had a great career, but at the same time, there’s other things to do.”

The regal Rivera has already established himself as a first ballot Hall of Famer — compiling a 75–57 record, 603 saves, a 2.21 ERA, 0.998 WHIP and 1,111 strikeouts in 1,211.1 innings over 1,042 regular season games. The Sandman is a 12-time All-Star who has received MVP votes nine years and Cy Young votes in six seasons.

But Rivera’s legacy in pinstripes will be defined by his seemingly effortless dominance when the lights were brightest, in clutch situations in the playoffs.

Arguably the most important member of the “Core Four” — along with Jeter, retired catcher Jorge Posada, and retired lefty starter and Game 2 specialist Andy Pettitte — Mo has an 8–1 record, 42 saves, 0.70 ERA, 0.759 WHIP and 110 strikeouts in 141.0 innings in 32 playoff series over 16 seasons. He’s played in seven World Series, winning five world championships (2009, 2000, 1999, 1998 and 1996) and the World Series MVP in 1999.

Nothing lasts forever. It’s closing time for Rivera, whose megawatt, million-dollar smile in the bullpen is contrasted by his intimidating, laser-focus death glare on the mound. The best closer there is or ever was wants to slam the door on his brilliant career before Father Time has a chance to catch up with his cut fastball and take it the other way.

“It is important for me to leave the game on top if God allows me to do that,” said Rivera. “I won’t be dragging my arm to pitch. I’m not going to start pitching with my left arm. I want to be able to compete.”

by Nathan Rush
 

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