R.A. Dickey No-Hitter? Or B.J. Upton Hit?

Unpublished

Official scorer's call in the first inning proved to be historical decision

<p> Was B.J. Upton’s chopper off R.A. Dickey down the third-base line a hit or an error? By my standards, it was an error. By most official scorer’s decisions on a nightly basis, it was a hit.</p>

Was B.J. Upton’s chopper off R.A. Dickey down the third-base line a hit or an error? By my standards, it was an error. By most official scorer’s decisions on a nightly basis, it was a hit.

It doesn’t carry the same weight as a block/charge in basketball or pass interference/no call in football — those decisions affect the outcome of the game — but every night in every baseball game the official scorer decides hit or error at least once. And while it doesn’t affect the outcome, it does play havoc with batting averages, ERAs and, as we saw last night, even history.

Wednesday night in St. Pete, this is not just your garden variety hit/error decision where the Mets' Dickey might call the press box during the game to have the scorer make a change, only to have Upton make a subsequent call to have it changed back. No. There’s much more import here.

You see, this was the only play in which the scorer ruled a hit for the Rays.

Dickey faced just two batters over the minimum during his sterling effort. Third baseman David Wright made an error on a ground ball by Elliot Johnson leading off the ninth inning. Had the no-hitter still been in effect, this would have been a defining moment. Instead, it was just another error.

The deeper issue I have is that official scorers have become much too hitter-friendly over the years. A quick glance at error totals through the years supports this. I understand that fielders are better, gloves are better, fields are immaculate eliminating most weird bounces, but it seems that in order to be charged with an error these days, the ball must bounce out of a glove, a throw sail wide or a ground ball must squirt through a fielder’s legs.

Wright should have made that play on Upton, in my opinion. From a pitcher’s perspective, an out should have been recorded. It wasn’t, so charge an error. However, by most scoring standards, this was a hit.

Last night, as the Cardinals were nursing a 1-0 lead in the ninth inning, a ground ball up the middle just eludes shortstop Rafael Furcal, allowing a runner to reach. My call: Error, no question. Official Scorer: Hit. In this instance, other than Alejandro De Aza of the White Sox having another hit in his column this morning, there was no impact whatsoever. No ERA effect, no game-changer, no history re-writing.

Questionable scoring decisions occur every night in every game. Most have no lasting effect, and most even would be considered “correct” by experts. And there are review processes in place under certain circumstances. But let’s not start changing calls just because a no-hitter is in play.

Upton was the third batter Dickey faced in the first inning, so no one is thinking no-hitter at that time. And with a 1 in the column under H on the scoreboard, no one is thinking no-hitter for the remainder of the game. So the suspense, the tension, the superstitions, the excitement of watching history unfold — all of that is gone.

The Mets are appealing to MLB to have the scoring changed to an error, giving Dickey a no-hitter. I’m sure the Mets would love to celebrate two no-hitters in one season after playing 50 years without one, but the moment is gone.

- Charlie Miller (@AthlonCharlie)

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