2014 NASCAR Driver Profile: Kyle Larson

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Larson's rise culminates in promotion to Sprint Cup Series

Season preview for Kyle Larson and the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup season.

Kyle Larson: NASCAR Sprint Cup Series star of the future.  Kyle Larson

That’s an outlook that seemed rather predictable at the start of the 2013 season. The young Californian had shown impressive talent in his quick move through the racing ranks and garnered a Nationwide Series contract from Chip Ganassi.

But the version of Kyle Larson we’ll have this year — that of a full-time Cup competitor, effective immediately — seemed almost impossible just a year ago, when Larson headed to Daytona for the Nationwide season-opener with only four career NASCAR national series starts to his name. His first full season in that second-tier division was moderately successful, with four second-place finishes, although he never won, nor was he a title contender.

Yet here we are, starting the new season with Larson’s name emblazoned where Juan Pablo Montoya’s once was on the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42. Target returns as the primary sponsor for Larson’s promotion to NASCAR’s top series at age 21.

It was a move by Ganassi that looked and felt a lot like a non-secured down-payment on Larson’s racing future. Undoubtedly, Ganassi was making a play that he hoped would head off anything resembling the raw deal Bill Davis faced when Jeff Gordon bolted his team for Hendrick Motorsports in the early 1990s.

Is it a case of too much, too soon? The jury’s still out; as with any rookie Sprint Cup driver, expect a lot of good with a lot of bad. Fortunately, Larson got four races worth of seat time in Ganassi-prepared cars for Harry Scott Jr.’s Sprint Cup team to close 2013.

Larson failed to finish his first two starts — Charlotte and Martinsville in October — thanks to engine issues. But he rolled to finishes of 23rd and 15th in the other two, impressing along the way.

It’s that kind of natural talent that made it possible for Larson to replace an all-around wheelman like Montoya. And it’s that kind of natural talent that will let him enter 2014 with little pressure from Ganassi to perform instantly. Confidence in the young driver’s future far outweighs the expected learning curve in Sprint Cup competition.

“I think Kyle is the kind of driver, when he sees an opportunity in front of him, he takes it,” says Ganassi. “If that means it’s a win, hey, great. There’s no pressure for him to win his first year out.”

Based on how well Larson ran in his limited time to close the season, worries about not winning may be short-lived. It’s not a stretch to think that Larson’s Sprint Cup learning curve will be a quick trip thanks to his unquestionable raw talent.

But just as Montoya and current teammate Jamie McMurray have found, the cars from the CGR shop may prove the biggest hindrance. Reliability hasn’t been a strong suit. Remember, too, that Ganassi and Target have gambled in the past with young Reed Sorenson — only to make a mistake.

That will not be the case here, though. Expect Larson to beat out many veterans on a weekly basis this year and in the point standings come November. And if a few breaks fall his way, he could just crack the top 16 by Richmond in September.



What the Competition is SayingAnonymous quotes from crew chiefs, owners and media
Kyle Larson is the most highly touted rookie the Sprint Cup Series has seen since Joey Logano, and those in the garage have nothing but praise for the youngster.

“Extremely versatile — can run anything and win,” one crew chief says. “He made it to where he is by winning and racing everywhere and in anything. He’s not a spoon-fed bitch.”

“His car control is about as good as anyone in the series,” another gushes. “And he’s striving to learn more about racing. He spends as much time as possible in cars to continue his development.”

The one potential hindrance, warns a rival, will be the equipment afforded him: “He’s in Ganassi equipment. The team he is on gets their engines from another organization. They also do not have the engineering depth of the larger teams. They are a tier-two team and will always be handicapped by the inability to control their own engine development. Plus, he’s a rookie and still learning how to race. He’ll have to learn how to pace himself on longer races.”


No. 42 Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet
Sponsors:
Target
Owner: Chip Ganassi/Felix Sabates
Crew Chief: Chris Heroy
Years with current team: 1
Under contract through: 2017
Best points finish: N/A
Hometown: Elk Grove, Calif.
Born: July 31, 1992


Photos by Action Sports, Inc.

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