10 Amazing Stats from Super Bowl 48

Get the Athlon Sports Newsletter

Highlighting the most important, bizarre, strange, interesting and historic stats from the Super Bowl.

10 Amazing Stats from Super Bowl 48

The 2013 NFL season is officially over and the Seattle Seahawks have won their first-ever world championship after dominating the Denver Broncos Sunday night in Super Bowl XLVIII. While the game at MetLife Stadium might have been a massive dud for fans not from the Pacific Northwest, the 48th playing of the greatest sporting event on the planet was not without some remarkable, amazing, historic and memorable stats.

Here are the 10 best stats from Super Bowl XLVIII:

3: Coaches to win a Super Bowl and NCAA national championship
Pete Carroll’s improbable career path from failed NFL coach to championship college coach at USC to persona non grata in Los Angeles to Super Bowl champion is fascinating. But when his Seahawks dominated the Broncos 43-8 on Sunday, he joined an elite fraternity of coaches to win a title on both the college and NFL levels. Barry Switzer at Oklahoma and Jimmy Johnson at Miami both won NCAA national championships in college before winning a Super Bowl for Dallas. Carroll is now one of three men to win the NCAA title and a Super Bowl. For the record, Paul Brown won a national title at Ohio State in 1942 and then a number of NFL championships — prior to the advent of the Super Bowl.

3: Jersey number won by Russell Wilson
Russell Wilson is easy to root for. He is an affable character with a great story, great personality and great maturity. But the odds he would be hoisting the Lombardi Trophy this year seemed slim to none. Wilson became the first quarterback to win the Super Bowl wearing jersey No. 3 and just the second African-American quarterback to win the Super Bowl (Doug Williams). He became just the fourth quarterback to win the big game in just his second season (Tom Brady, Kurt Warner, Ben Roethlisberger). Wilson is also 5-foot-11 and a third-round pick (sounds like Drew Brees to me).

11-12: Peyton Manning’s playoff record as a starter
Manning was playing for a lot on Sunday. A second Super Bowl title and perhaps the legacy of being labeled the greatest of all-time. However, Manning was flustered all day, threw two critical interceptions and got little to no help from his defense. His all-time playoff record dropped below .500 again (11-12) during his remarkable career. One of his two interceptions was returned 69 yards for a touchdowns by Super Bowl MVP Malcolm Smith — the longest interceptions return since the Saints' Tracy Porter took one back 74 yards in Super Bow XLIV against, you guessed it, Peyton Manning. The phrase “he’s the greatest regular-season quarterback in NFL history” will be heard at every water cooler in America this week as he fell to 1-2 on Super Sunday.

0: Interceptions thrown by Russell Wilson in the playoffs
Manning is the name that gets all of the recognition. And rightly so. However, Wilson, after struggling for much of the final month of the regular season, played flawless football this postseason. After an effective performance against Denver (206 yards, 2 TDs on 72 percent passing), Wilson capped his championship run without throwing an interception in 68 attempts. His final playoff statline for this year: 43-68 (63.2 percent), 524 yards, six touchdowns, zero interceptions, 11 rushes for 42 yards. Coincidentally, zero is also the number of quarterbacks who have won a Super Bowl with two different teams — something Peyton Manning would have done on Sunday had his team not laid a giant egg.

12: Seconds it took for Seattle to score the game’s first points
The fastest score in Super Bowl history was Devin Hester’s kickoff return for a touchdown in Super Bowl XLI. It took him 14 seconds to work his way 92 yards down the field against the Colts quarterbacked by… Peyton Manning. When Manning stepped up to the line on the first play from scrimmage Sunday night in MetLife Stadium, the snap sailed past everyone and into the end zone for a safety just 12 seconds into the game. It was the fastest points scored in Super Bowl history. It also means that Seattle led the Super Bowl for a record 59 minutes and 48 seconds.

3: Straight Super Bowls with a safety
The opening safety was as bizarre as it gets from a prop bet standpoint  — someone likely cashed in big with “safety” as the first scoring play — but the two-point play makes for an interesting Super Bowl trend. It marks the third straight Super Bowl with a safety. The Ravens took a safety late in the game to preserve the lead with four seconds to play. Two years ago, New England's first offensive play of the game was a safety when Tom Brady was called for intentional grounding with 8:52 left in the first quarter. It also was the first score of the game.

19: Minutes it took the Broncos to get a first down
Manning and the Broncos looked completely out of sorts for the entire game. Seattle’s front seven pressured him on every dropback and the running game offered little to no support — try 27 yards on 14 carries. It took 19 minutes of game time and four drives for the most prolific offense in NFL history to get a first down. The Broncos' first possession ended on one play (safety), the second was a three-and-out and the third featured Manning’s first interception on a third down. But on third-and-one roughly midway through the second quarter, Knowshon Moreno rushed five yards and picked up Denver’s first first down of the game.

13: Super Bowl-record number of receptions for Demaryius Thomas
Thomas would likely trade his personal success for more team success but at least no one can say they caught more passes in a Super Bowl than Thomas. He finished with a Super Bowl-record 13 receptions for 118 yards and a touchdown. The previous record was 11 held by four different players: Cincinnati tight end Dan Ross (XVI), New England’s Deion Branch (XXXIX) and Wes Welker (XLII) and the legendary Jerry Rice (XXIII).

34: Super Bowl-record numbers of completions for Peyton Manning
Like Thomas, Manning set a completely worthless record in the Super Bowl on Sunday. He completed a Super Bowl-record 34 passes on 49 attempts. The previous record was 32, set by Tom Brady in Super Bowl XXXVIII against the Panthers and Drew Brees against the Colts in Super Bowl XLIV. Both Brady and Brees took home the Lombardi Trophy.

7/1: Odds Seattle will repeat as Super Bowl champions
Vegas works quickly and the odds are out (according to Pregame.com’s RJ Bell) for Super Bowl XLIV. Seattle and Denver top the list at 7/1 and 8/1 respectively, as Bell is calling for a rematch next year. San Francisco is tied with the Broncos at 8/1 while New England (12/1), Green Bay (20/1) and New Orleans (20/1) round out the top five. Bring up the rear, Jacksonville and Oakland are the least likeliest teams to win the Super Bowl next season at 200/1.

Exclude From Games: 
Include In Games

Home Page Infinite Scroll Left