20 Most Amazing Stats in Super Bowl History

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The most important, interesting, intriguing and amazing Super Bowl Stats

<p> The most important, interesting, intriguing and amazing Super Bowl Stats.</p>

NFL football is the greatest reality TV program of all time. The Giants and Colts made sure of that back in 1958. Each NFL fall is a completely new and original experience for every player, fan and coach alike. New stories, new personalities, new winners and new losers. And new statistics.

Here are the most important, most intriguing and most bizarre statistics to keep in mind about the 46-year history of the Super Bowl:

162,900,000: People who watched Super Bowl XLV
The Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers put together the single-most viewed television program in American history in 2011. The previous record had been the Colts-Saints Super Bowl on Feb. 7, 2010 with 153.4 million viewers. Last year's Super Bowl between the Giants and Patriots was the No. 2-most viewed program with 159.2 million.

0: Time the Vikings have led in the Super Bowl
The Jaguars, Browns, Texans and Lions have never played in a Super Bowl and therefore never led in the Big Game. However, the Vikings have played in four Super Bowls and never held a lead. That's 240 minutes of gametime either tied or trailing.

414: Record passing yards for Kurt Warner
The former grocery bagger threw for an Super Bowl-record 414 yards in the win over the Tennessee Titans in Super Bowl XXXIV. This included his 73-yard game-winning touchdown pass to Isaac Bruce with just over two minutes remaining. Warner also owns the No. 2 passing performance (377 yards for Arizona in a loss to Pittsburgh) and the No. 3 performance (365 yards in a St. Louis loss to New England).

204: Timmy Smith Super Bowl rushing record
The Denver Broncos began Super Bowl XXII by taking a 10-0 lead into the second quarter over the Washington Redskins. But then Doug Williams and Timmy Smith happened. The record 35-point second quarter put the game all but out of reach by halftime. The game was special for a variety of reasons. First, Williams was the first black quarterback to win the Super Bowl, and Smith became the only player to top 200 yards rushing in a Super Bowl. He finished with 204 yards on 22 carries with two touchdowns as the Redskins set the Super Bowl record for total offense with 602 yards. Ironically, Smith ended his entire NFL career with exactly 602 yards (21 games).

10: Largest comeback in Super Bowl history
The aforementioned Redskins set this record as well after trailing 10-0 to Denver before finishing off the Broncos 42-10. The deficit was tied in the 2009 season when Drew Brees and the Saints fell behind 10-0 before coming back to defeat the Colts 31-17.

103,985: Largest crowd to attend a Super Bowl
The 1979 season featured the largest crowd to ever attend a Super Bowl when the Steelers defeated the Rams 31-19 in Pasadena, Calif. The Rose Bowl hosted the Los Angeles Rams that year in what remains the closest thing to a home-field advantage in a Super Bowl.
 
6-10: Worst record by a Super Bowl winner the following year
John Elway won back-to-back Super Bowls for the Denver Broncos (XXXII, XXXIII) and ended his playing career in style. However, his Broncos went on to accomplish something no other Super Bowl champion had done once he retired. By losing 10 games in 1999, the Broncos posted the worst record by a Super Bowl champion the following season. Denver finished last in the AFC West.

6: Most Super Bowl appearances by any one player
Mike Lodish played 11 seasons in the NFL, and six of them ended in the Super Bowl. The defensive lineman was drafted out of UCLA in 1990 and played five years for the Buffalo Bills (1990-94) before his six-year career with the Broncos. He played in all four of the Bills' Super Bowls and won twice with the Broncos, making him the only player in NFL history to have played in six Super Bowls. Sixteen players have played in five Super Bowls.

5: Most Super Bowl starts by any one quarterback
John Elway started five Super Bowls when he won his second Lombardi Trophy in 1998 when Denver handled Atlanta with relative ease. Last season, Tom Brady matched Elway with his fifth Super Bowl start. However, neither can claim the most Super Bowl victories as Pittsburgh’s Terry Bradshaw and San Francisco’s Joe Montana won all four of their Super Bowl starts.

7: Fewest rushing yards gained in a Super Bowl
The Monsters of the Midway were one of the most dominate defensive units in NFL history, and it led to the Chicago Bears lone Super Bowl win back in 1985. In the Louisiana Superdome, William Perry and Mike Singletary posted the best defensive performance in Super Bowl history by holding New England to just seven yards rushing. The Patriots' 123 total yards of offense is the second-lowest total in Super Bowl history.

42,000: Average cost of a 30-second commercial in Super Bowl I
The cost of a television ad in Super Bowl I was $42,000 per 30-second spot. That number reached seven figures for the first time in 1995 ($1.15 million) and has more than tripled since. This year, CBS is anticipating more than $225 million in ad revenue alone at a 30-second per unit cost of $3.8 million.

338: Media credentials issued for Super Bowl I
By 2012, the number swelled to 5,156 accredited media members to cover Super Bowl XLVI, a record for the championship game.

22.6: Lowest QB rating for a Super Bowl winner
Ben Roethlisberger completed 9-of-21 passes for 123 yards, no touchdowns and two interceptions in Pittsburgh’s Super Bowl XL win over Seattle. It is the worst performance by a Super Bowl winning quarterback. At 23 years and 340 days, Big Ben was also the youngest quarterback to ever win the big game.

3: Fewest points scored in a Super Bowl
The 1971 Miami Dolphins are the only team to ever play in a Super Bowl and not reach the endzone. Their 24-3 loss to Dallas in Super Bowl VI featured the lowest scoring offense in the history of the game. The 1974 Minnesota Vikings are the only other team not to reach at least seven points on Super Sunday, but at least they reached the endzone — albeit on defense when Terry Brown recovered a Steelers’ fumble in the endzone. They missed the extra point and set the Super Bowl record for fewest total yards of offense with 119.

9: Bills’ Super Bowl record for turnovers
The Dallas Cowboys crushed the Bills 52-17 in Super Bowl XXVII. This lop-sided affair was headlined by a Super Bowl-record nine turnovers lost by Buffalo. Strangely enough, Dallas also claims the No. 2-most forced turnovers with eight against Denver in the Super Bowl XII win and seven forced against Baltimore in the Super Bowl V loss. How did they lose to the Colts after forcing seven turnovers? Speaking of...

34-3: Record of team with fewer turnovers than the opponent
Turnovers are simply the name of the game and there is no more telling stat than this one. In the Super Bowl, the team with fewer turnovers is 34-3 all-time. The formula is fairly straight forward: Protect the football and become a champion. 

11: Player to have won the MVP and the Super Bowl in the same year
Bart Starr (1966), Earl Morrall (1968), Terry Bradshaw (1978), Mark Moseley (1982), Lawrence Taylor (1986), Joe Montana (1989), Emmitt Smith (1993), Steve Young (1994), Brett Favre (1996), Terrell Davis (1998) and Kurt Warner (1999) are the 11 double-dippers.

22-24: Coin toss winners record in the Super Bowl
The winner of the opening coin toss has gone on to win 22 Super Bowls while the loser has won the game more frequently. However, the last decade has indicated that teams should be rooting against the coin toss. The winner of the last nine coin tosses has gone on to win the Super Bowl just three times. Strangely, only three times has a team deferred to the second half and all three have taken place in the last four seasons. The 2010 Packers are the only team to ever defer on the coin toss and then win the Super Bowl.

1: People to win the Super Bowl as a head coach and player
Tom Flores won two Super Bowls as the head coach of the Raiders and was technically on the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs roster. However, he did not see any time on the field in Kansas City's win Minnesota in Super Bowl IV. Mike Ditka, a Hall of Fame tight end for the Bears, Eagles and Cowboys, caught two passes for two passes for 28 yards and touchdown in Super Bowl VI. He then led the Bears to the championship in 1985 to become the only Super Bowl-winning coach to have won the big game as a player as well.

0: Super Bowls without at least one field goal attempt
Four times has a Super Bowl featured one combined field goal attempt, but never has a Super Bowl lacked for at least one field goal try. Super Bowl VII, XXIV, XXXIX and XLII each featured one field goal effort.

Check out Athlon Sports' special Super Bowl section for more coverage on the Ravens vs. 49ers and the history of the big game.

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