2014 NFL Draft Sleepers

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Stanford should have a host of quality defenders drafted this year.

2014 NFL Draft Sleepers

David Bakhtiari was the 109th overall pick in the 2013 NFL Draft.

The left tackle out of Colorado was the ninth offensive tackle taken in the NFL Draft a year ago and all he did was start 16 games as a rookie protecting Aaron Rodgers' blind side (no, Rodgers got hurt when he rolled to his right).

The Packers also drafted Eddie Lacy with the 61st overall pick in the 2013 NFL Draft and the former Alabama running back went on to become the only rookie Pro Bowler not selected in the first round.

What about Kiko Alonso? Kawann Short? Giovani Bernard, Johnathan Cyprien, Geno Smith or D.J. Swearinger? All second-round picks. How about Andre Ellington, Josh Evans, Chris Jones and Mychal Rivera? They were all third-round picks.

The point is that talent can be found in any round of the annual NFL selection process and 2014 won’t be any different. Green Bay general manager Ted Thompson has long been considered one of the best talent evaluators in the league and its one of the reasons why the Packers consistently make playoff appearances and win division titles.

How a team drafts in the middle rounds is just as important as how it performs in the first round. So who are the sleepers we like to make an impact in the ’14 NFL Draft?

Offensive Sleepers:

Aaron Murray, QB, Georgia (6-1, 207)
Don’t worry about the knee injury that ended his career at Georgia a few games short. In fact, Murray broke his leg during his senior season at famed Tampa (Fla.) Plant High School only to return that same season to win his second state championship. Murray has long been compared to Drew Brees due to his playing style, stature and desire to win. He led his team on numerous comebacks despite numerous injuries as a senior, won two SEC East titles and is the most prolific passer in the history of the SEC. Look for Murray to be taken in the second or third round — just like Brees and Russell Wilson — and for him to eventually be a starting NFL QB. Projection: Round 4

Jeremy Hill, RB, LSU (6-0, 233)
I’ve already written about Hill plenty here and he may move too quickly up draft boards by the time the second round rolls around. But there is a chance he’s the best back in the class. He has workhorse size, power and toughness and only carried 345 times in two college seasons so there is plenty of tread left on the tires. As long as his off-the-field distractions are behind him, Hill has a chance to be an extremely good player over the next 4-5 years. Projection: Round 2-3

Ka’Deem Carey, RB, Arizona (5-9, 207)
Few players play bigger than the 5-foot-9 Carey from Arizona. He touched the ball over 700 times in the last two seasons, racking up over 4,200 yards and scoring 44 times. That is production. He isn’t afraid of contact, will catch passes, picks up the blitz and is durable. Other than one small off-the-field distraction during his sophomore offseason, there is no downside to the Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year and consensus All-American. Projection: Round 3-4

Jared Abbrederis, WR, Wisconsin (6-1, 195)
In one of the most talented and versatile wide receivers classes in recent memory, Abbrederis might be the most underrated. He’s got 4.5 speed, is an excellent return man, was incredibly productive across the board and torched potential first-round pick Bradley Roby in a head-to-head battle this year — try 10 receptions for 207 yards and a touchdown. He’s not a big, rangy wideout, but he has every tool and the discipline needed to be very successful in the NFL in the mold of an Eric Decker. Projection: Round 4

Kelvin Benjamin, WR, Florida State (6-5, 240)
This may not count as a sleeper, especially if he vaults into the first round, but there is no hiding Benjamin’s overall upside. He is a physical specimen who is virtually uncoverable due to his rare combination of size and speed. Someone is going to get a Megatron-esque player with Benjamin early in the second round. Jus ask Jameis Winston or Jimbo Fisher whose number they’d call with the national championship game on the line. Projection: Round 2

Arthur Lynch, TE, Georgia (6-5, 258)
Cut from the same mold as Zach Ertz or Coby Fleener, Lynch played at a school and for a coach who knows how to use big, athletic and versatile tight ends. Many opposing coaches called Lynch the best player on the Dawgs' roster after four productive seasons in Athens. He is a solid blocker and averaged more than 16 yards per catch in his two seasons as a starter. In a class with very little to like at the tight end positions, Lynch could be the steal of the draft. Projection: Round 4

Cyril Richardson, G, Baylor (6-5, 329)
A four-time All-Big 12 selection in one form or another, Richardson was arguably the most integral offensive part of the Bears' first-ever Big 12 title not named Bryce Petty. He is a two-time Big 12 Offensive Lineman of the Year and is as durable and dependable as anyone in the draft. Richardson missed one game during his four-year career (51 games) and started 38 games over the last three seasons. He has the size, the talent and the work ethic to be a long-time starter in the NFL. Projection: Round 3-4

Jack Mewhort, T, Ohio State (6-6, 309)
“He’s one of my all-time favorite players.” That is from Urban Meyer last November to the media when asked if Mewhort belonged in the Outland Trophy conversation. Mewhort has size, is a great leader, a hard worker, brings a great presence to the locker room and, oh by the way, can block with the best of them. He may not have Greg Robinson’s upside or raw talent but there are few things this Buckeye lineman can’t do on a football field. Projection: Round 2-3

Gabe Jackson, G, Mississippi State (6-3, 336)
Like Kentucky’s Larry Warford before him, Jackson has consistently been recognized as one of the SEC’s best blockers for years. He was a three-time All-SEC selection in some shape or form and played on the only Mississippi State team that went to four straight bowl games. He isn’t tall but is plenty wide and will be a regular in the NFL for the next decade. Projection: Round 2-3

Defensive Sleepers:

Will Sutton, DT, Arizona State (6-1, 303)
Sutton is the first player in the Pac-12 to win back-to-back Defensive Player of the Year honors since Steve Emtman in 1990-91. This in the same league with Star Lotulelei. Sutton has played multiple positions at multiple weights and is a leader in the huddle and on the practice field for a team that has won 18 games over the last two seasons and posted the best record in the conference. Sutton is a bit undersized but he is extremely disruptive behind the line of scrimmage — so say his 45.5 tackles for a loss and 20.5 sacks. Projection: Round 3

Trent Murphy, DE, Stanford (6-5, 250)
Cut from the DeMarcus Ware cloth, Murphy is a perfect hybrid end/linebacker outside rusher. He posted 25.0 sacks and 41.5 tackles for a loss over the last two seasons for a defense that was among the best in the nation. He won two Pac-12 titles during those two years as well. He also showed his athletic ability by returning both career interceptions for touchdowns (40 yards and 30 yards). Murphy will exceed expectations. Projections: Round 2-3

Aaron Lynch, DE, USF (6-5, 249)
Looking for a deep sleeper with loads of upside? Look no further than the former Notre Dame transfer. Lynch is dripping with athletic ability and has a frame to grow into one of the most imposing defensive ends in the league. The key for Lynch will be his commitment and focus. Should the light bulb come on now that he’s playing for a paycheck — which tends to happen — then some team will get a Justin Houston-type edge player late in the draft. Projection: Round 4-5

Max Bullough, MLB, Michigan State (6-4, 249)
Bullough was suspended from the Rose Bowl but otherwise had the consummate career at Michigan State. He comes from a rich football family and he plays with a high level of awareness. He has elite size for the middle and has proven to be a leader on a very physical defensive unit. He was a three-year starter, two-time captain and led the Spartans to their first Big Ten title and Rose Bowl berth since 1987. Projection: Round 5

Shayne Skov, MLB, Stanford (6-2, 245)
The intangibles for Skov are off the charts. He was a three-time All-Pac-12 performer and a freshman All-American in his first year. He did miss most of the 2011 campaign with a season-ending knee injury early in the year but he bounced back with two huge upperclass seasons — both ending with a Pac-12 championship. He’s not the most overly explosive player but he is always in the right place at the right time. Skov posted 190 tackles, 21.0 for a loss, 8.0 sacks and three huge forced fumbles over his final two seasons. Projection: Round 3-4

Jeremiah Attaochu, OLB, Georgia Tech (6-3, 252)
This doesn’t appear to be a very deep class of outside linebackers — hybrids or true 4-3 players. Attaochu is a true pass-rusher from the OLB position and would fit into a 3-4 very well as a third-down specialist to begin his career. The Yellow Jacket prospect is long and rangy and can get to the quarterback as his 31.5 career sacks (22.5 in the last two years) and 43.5 tackles for a loss indicate. Draft him and plug him in on third downs. Projection: Round 2-3

Lamarcus Joyner, CB, Florida State (5-8, 185)
He is a veteran, a leader and a champion. Joyner is a bit undersized but he can play all over the defense and is a physical player despite his overall lack of bulk and power. He is quick, aggressive and simply makes plays — he posted 5.5 sacks as a senior from his defensive back position. Look for coordinators to use him all over the field on the next level. Projection: Round 2

Stanley Jean-Baptiste, DB, Nebraska (6-3, 218)
Size is the first thing that comes to mind with the Nebraska defensive back. He has a massive frame and could easily slide into a role at safety at the back end of an NFL defense. He led his team in interceptions as a senior and should continue to flourish on the next level with his rare blend of size, speed and athleticism. Projection: Round 2

Ed Reynolds, S, Stanford (6-1, 207)
The star safety is yet another under appreciated Cardinal defender that could be a steal on draft day. Reynolds has constantly made big plays on a defense that has won back-to-back championships. He posted 133 tackles and seven interceptions over the last two seasons in the starting lineup — leading the nation in return yards with 301 and three touchdowns as a sophomore. Projection: Round 4-5

Dion Bailey, FS, USC (6-0, 201)
At just 200 pounds, Bailey started for two seasons as a strong-side linebacker for USC, earning freshman All-American honors and All-Pac-12 honors in two seasons. He then transitioned perfectly to his more natural and future pro position of safety in 2013. Bailey is constantly around the ball as he posted 223 tackles, 16.5 for a loss, 3.5 sacks and 11 interceptions in three years. He will be a playmaker on the next level for years to come. Projection: Round 4

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