Amazing Stats from the NFL's 2013 Wild Card Weekend

Unpublished

Get the Athlon Sports Newsletter

Highlighting the most important, bizarre, strange, interesting and historic stats from this week in the NFL.

Amazing Stats from the NFL's 2013 Wildcard Weekend

Numbers and statistics are unquestionably a huge part of the game. Any game, for that matter.

Some fall on the sabermetric side of things, while others like to keep it simple and use the ol' eyeball test. In the football world, that means total offense, total defense and points scored versus points per play and defensive efficiency ratings. Rational and logical arguments can be made for the legitimacy and relevance of both sides of the stats spectrum.

With that in mind, Athlon Sports brings the most intriguing, important, historic and bizarre stats from Wild Card Weekend:

8: NFL-record consecutive playoff losses for Kansas City
The Chiefs were leading 31-10 at halftime and pushed their lead to 38-10 early in the third quarter. Andrew Luck and the Colts then outscored Kansas City 35-6 over the final 27 minutes of play to win 45-44 in Lucas Oil Stadium. The loss for the Chiefs was an NFL-record eighth consecutive playoff defeat dating back to a 1993 win over Houston in the AFC Divisional round. The Lions have the second-longest losing streak in NFL playoff history with seven losses in a row, while Cleveland, Dallas, Minnesota, Seattle and the New York Giants each have had a six-game playoff losing streak. The Chiefs' losing streak is obviously the longest active streak, followed by the Lions, but Cincinnati, after falling to San Diego on Sunday, joins the next group after its sixth straight playoff loss. Cincy's last playoff win also came against Houston, but in the 1990 Wild Card round, giving the Bengals the longest drought in the NFL without a playoff win (24 years).

28: NFL’s second largest playoff comeback
Luck and the Colts were brilliant in the second half of their Wild Card win over Kansas City. Trailing 38-10 with just over 12 minutes to play, Luck went on a Frank Reich-esque tear to lead Indianapolis to as improbable a playoff win as the league has ever seen. The four-touchdown comeback was the second largest in NFL history, trailing only the Bills' miraculous and infamous comeback against Houston. Buffalo overcame a 32-point deficit in the 1992 Wild Card game against the Oilers to win in overtime. San Francisco topped the Giants 39-38 in 2002 in a 24-point comeback and Detroit beat the 49ers 31-27 after a 20-point comeback in 1957. Those are the four largest playoff comebacks in NFL history.

11: Andrew Luck’s NFL-leading fourth-quarter/overtime game-winning drives since 2012 season
Since entering the NFL last season, no player in the NFL has more game-winning, fourth-quarter or overtime drives over the last two seasons (including playoffs). Sunday marked the 11th time since Week 1 of 2012 that Luck led his team on a game-winning drive. The second-year quarterback finished 29-of-45 for 443 yards passing with seven rushing attempts for 45 yards. He accounted for five total touchdowns. Wide receiver T.Y. Hilton set franchise playoff records with 13 receptions and 224 yards as well. Tony Romo and Russell Wilson are tied for second behind Luck with nine fourth-quarter or overtime game-winning drives since the start of the ’12 season. Joe Flacco and Matt Ryan are next on the list with eight such drives.

80 and 3.6: Eagles yards rushing and yards per carry against the Saints
Chip Kelly’s offense was one of the best in the NFL in 2013. The Eagles led the NFL in rushing at 160.4 yards per game, led the NFL in yards rushing per carry at 5.1 per and were No. 2 in the NFL with 19 rushing touchdowns this season. The Saints, a team ranked 19th in rushing defense (111.6) and 28th in rushing yards per carry (4.6), did a fabulous job bottling up LeSean McCoy, the NFL’s leading rusher. McCoy and the Eagles rushed 22 times for 80 yards for just 3.6 yards per carry in the loss. The 80 yards allowed were the second-lowest total allowed by the Saints all season long (75, St. Louis). The 80 yards rushing were the third-lowest total of the year for Kelly’s offense.

1: New Orleans franchise road playoff wins
Entering Wild Card weekend, the New Orleans Saints had never won a road playoff game in nearly 50 years of NFL football. The Saints had lost all five previous road postseason games before topping the Eagles 26-24 in Philadelphia. Using a veteran quarterback and aforementioned tremendous defensive effort, New Orleans earned the right to visit Seattle in the Divisional Round — the same place where the Saints were upset by a 7-9 Seahawks team in the 2010 NFC Wild Card round.

12.1: Colin Kaepernick's playoff yards per carry average against Green Bay
Colin Kaepernick is 3-0 against the Packers in his short career, including two playoff wins in each of the last two seasons. His ability to make things happen with his legs has been the death of the Green Bay defense in each of the two playoff games. Kaepernick has rushed 23 times for  279 yards and two touchdowns at an astonishing 12.1-yard clip in two playoff wins over the Packers. The San-Fran signal-caller made critical plays on the ground when the things broke down in the pocket and the Packers' depleted defense had no answer for No. 7 in the open field. He finished with 98 yards rushing on seven carries to go with 227 yards passing. It was the first road playoff win in five tries for the 49ers at Lambeau Field.

Minus-10: Wind chill temperature at kickoff in Lambeau Field
The coldest game in NFL history was the Ice Bowl in 1967 between Green Bay and Dallas at minus-13 degrees at kickoff with minus-48 wind chill. The Freezer Bowl was the second-coldest in NFL history when the Bengals beat the Chargers in minus-9 degree temperatures in the face of an absurd minus-59 wind chill. The third coldest was the minus-1 degree NFC Championship game between the Giants and Packers at the end of the ’07 season. The 49ers' win over Green Bay featured a temperature of five degrees with a minus-10 degree wind chill at kickoff.

14-0: San Diego’s record when Philip Rivers attempts 21 or fewer passes
The Chargers ran the ball 40 times for 196 yards to beat the Bengals in Cincinnati on Sunday. Philip Rivers completed 12 of just 16 passes in the game for 128 yards in the win. In 128 regular-season and eight career playoff starts, Rivers has thrown fewer than 16 passes just three times and he has thrown 21 or fewer just 14 times in a start. San Diego has never lost (14-0) when Rivers throws 21 or fewer passes in a game, including 2-0 in such playoff starts. When Rivers throws 40 or more passes, San Diego is 6-22 all-time, including one playoff loss. Additionally, the Chargers are 22-2 when Rivers starts and throws 23 or fewer passes in his career. The formula seems pretty obvious for Mike McCoy and company — take the ball out of Rivers’ hands and run it.

1-2: Record of first-year coaches in the playoffs
Three first-year head coaches led their team to the playoffs this fall. Andy Reid watched his Chiefs give up the second-biggest lead in NFL playoff history. Chip Kelly’s powerful rushing attack was totally stuffed by a team not known for its ability to stop the run. So San Diego’s Mike McCoy was the only first-year head coach to claim a playoff victory with his convincing 27-10 road win over the Bengals. San Diego now heads to Denver to face Peyton Manning and the Broncos — a team it beat 27-20 three weeks ago in Denver when Rivers threw just 20 passes.

Exclude From Games: 
Include In Games

Home Page Infinite Scroll Left