Better Coach: Jim Harbaugh or John Harbaugh?

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Who’s the best coach in the Harbaugh family? The 49ers’ Jim or the Ravens’ John?

<p> Who’s the best coach in the Harbaugh family? The 49ers’ Jim Harbaugh or the Ravens’ John Harbaugh? On Thanksgiving night, Jack Harbaugh's sons become the first brothers to head coach against each other in the 92-year history of the NFL.</p>

John Harbaugh, Ravens

Jack Harbaugh — a longtime college coach who won a Division I-AA national title at Western Kentucky in 2002 — has an NFL coaching tree that consists of his two sons, Jim and John. In the Harbaugh family, there’s sizzle (Jim) and then there’s steak (John). I’ll take John’s substantive track record over Jim’s stylish start.

Jim untucks his shirt, hoots, hollers and jumps around like he’s won the Super Bowl — after a Week 6 win over traditional doormat Detroit — disrespectfully slap-fiving the opposing coach, embarrassing himself and overshadowing his team’s hard-fought win with a rookie, bush league move. Who does that? The best in the business don’t.

Twelve coaches have won multiple Super Bowls — Vince Lombardi, Don Shula, Chuck Noll, Tom Landry, Tom Flores, Bill Walsh, Joe Gibbs, Bill Parcells, Jimmy Johnson, George Seifert, Mike Shanahan and Bill Belichick. How many of those men would have celebrated like Jim Harbaugh? How many are better than that?

John keeps his cool like a champion when confronted with off-the-wall insanity. When Chiefs hot-head coach Todd Haley accused the Ravens of “running up the score” in a preseason game, John Harbaugh was the bigger man, calmly explaining the situation without talking down. Come to think of it, John probably has decades of experience settling down his similarly exciteable little brother Jim.

Reliably cool under pressure, John Harbaugh had a 42–22 record (including playoffs) entering his Thanksgiving night fight with Jim. Only the Steelers (45) have more wins since John took over in 2008. The 49-year-old is the only coach in NFL history to take over a team with a losing record (5–11) and proceed to win a playoff game in each of the next three seasons. In fact, Baltimore is the only team in the entire NFL with a win in each of the last three postseasons, going 4–3 with a trip to the AFC title game.

Growing up, Jim was the better quarterback. Today, John is the better coach.

– Nathan Rush

Jim Harbaugh, 49ers

I’ll stipulate right off the bat that in making the case for Jim as the better Harbaugh, I’m doing my share of projecting; he’s in his first NFL season, after all, and that’s too small a sample size to draw any definitive conclusions. But what a season. Jim has taken the high-energy, high-emotion approach that made him such an immediate success at the University of San Diego and Stanford and gone pro with it.

In his first year after leaving the low-pressure comfort of The Farm, Jim has done more than breathe new life into a once-proud franchise. He’s pulled off a near-miracle. It’s not like anyone thought that this team was a piece or two away from contention; if anything, the disastrous Mike Singletary regime seemed to set the 49ers’ already sagging fortunes on an irreversible course toward irrelevance.

In the eight seasons leading up to Harbaugh’s hiring, the 49ers went a combined 46–82, never winning more than eight games in any one of those seasons and suffering double-digit losses in four of them, including a 6–10 showing in 2010. Harbaugh’s Niners have already clinched a winning season and will be playing meaningful January games for the first time since 2002.

The most amazing aspect of the Niners’ sudden turnaround? The Alex Smith Reclamation Project. We all knew that Harbaugh could develop quarterbacks — he was Andrew Luck’s primary tutor for three years — but this is ridiculous. Under his third head coach and seventh different offensive coordinator, Smith is suddenly thriving, showing unprecedented accuracy and leadership. Is it a coincidence that Smith’s emergence has coincided with Harbaugh’s arrival? Hardly. It’s simply the by-product of playing for the best coach named Harbaugh on the planet, and one of the best, period.

– Rob Doster

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