New York vs. Boston Rivalry

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The Big Apple and Beantown have nation's best sports town feud and culture clash.

<p> The Big Apple and Beantown have nation's best sports town feud and culture clash, going toe-to-toe for bragging rights over Babe Ruth, Tom Brady, Derek Jeter, Larry Bird, Eli Manning, Mike Tyson, Rocky Marciano, Bill Belichick, Bill Parcells, Martin Scorsese and clam chowder.</p>

When the New York Giants and New England Patriots kick off Super Bowl XLVI at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, the game won’t be just a rematch of Super Bowl XLII, it will be a renewal of the greatest sports town rivalry and culture clash in the country — New York vs. Boston. Which city has the edge heading into Super Sunday? The following is a tale of the tape:

Ruthian shadow:
Sultan of Swat vs. The Bambino
The 1919 sale of Babe Ruth from the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees is a good place to start. After winning three World Series in four years (1914-16, ’18), Red Sox owner Harry Frazee — a New Yorker — sold Ruth to the rival Yankees for $100,000. Then, as the disputed legend has it, Frazee invested the money in a Broadway production of “No, No, Nanette.” The Sultan of Swat hit 659 of his 714 career home runs in pinstripes and the Yankees won 26 World Series titles before Boston finally crushed the “Curse of the Bambino.”
Edge: New York

Miraculous title run:
Super Bowl XLII vs. 2004 ALCS
Eli Manning and the Giants ended Tom Brady and the Patriots’ quest for an undefeated, incomparable 19–0 season in dramatic fashion — winning 17–14 on a last-minute drive that included a “Helmet Catch” by David Tyree. But New York’s underdog story pales in comparison to Boston’s comeback in the 2004 American League Championship Series. The Red Sox trailed the Yankees 0–3 heading into Game 4 of the ALCS before winning eight straight games — four elimination contests against the Evil Empire in the ALCS and a sweep of the Cardinals in the World Series — to win their first World Series championship in 86 years.
Edge: Boston

Maniacal genius:
Bill Parcells vs. Bill Belichick
The Big Tuna had Belichick as his defensive coordinator on the Giants’ championship squads that won Super Bowls XXI and XXV — the latter title team also had current Big Blue coach Tom Coughlin as receivers coach. But after Belichick hit the road, Parcells never won it all again — although he did lose Super Bowl XXXI as coach of the Patriots. Belichick belly-flopped as the mistake by the lake in Cleveland, but bounced back in New England, winning three (maybe four) Super Bowls in five trips to the big game. Wearing a gray cutoff hoody, as opposed to a Tuna-tight blue sweater, Belichick has become the modern standard.
Edge: Boston

“Overrated” playboy:
Derek Jeter vs. Tom Brady
Two of the most envied men in the world, Jeter and Brady have been labeled “overrated pretty boys” by many. But the duo has been laughing all the way to the bank with a hand full of championship rings and a supermodel starlet on their arm. The king of New York since 1996, Jeter has five World Series titles and has been linked to every girl in Manhattan — Minka Kelly, Mariah Carey, Jessica Alba, etc. Meanwhile, Touchdown Tom is making his record-tying fifth Super Bowl appearance, is married to Brazilian bombshell Gisele Bundchen and has a baby by stateside sweetheart Bridget Moynahan.
Edge: New York

“Overachieving” champ:
Eli Manning vs. Larry Bird
Peyton’s little brother and the NBA’s great white hope both possessed off-the-charts talent but were underrated for various reasons. Elite Eli’s confused “Manning face” expression and Larry Legend’s blonde mullet-mustache combo were part of the problem. Bird won three titles, three MVPs and three 3-point crowns; Manning is working on winning his second Super Bowl in five seasons and, at 31, still has plenty of time to build a resume that rivals his brother’s.
Edge: Boston

Edible nickname:
Big Apple vs. Beantown
The term “Big Apple” was 1920’s horse racing slang that went mainstream thanks primarily to local scribe John J. Fitz Gerald. “Beantown” was slathered with molasses and baked beans back in colonial times of yesteryear.
Edge: New York

Clam chowder:
Manhattan vs. New England
Cream-based or tomato-based? Potatoes or no? Old school or new wave?
Edge: Boston

Scorsese flick:
Goodfellas vs. The Departed
The 1990 East Brooklyn, Italian mafia tale of Henry Hill draws down against the 2006 South Boston, Irish mob story of Frank Costello. Both films are Martin Scorsese classics based on true stories. But do they amuse you? Like a clown? I heard things.
Edge: New York

Iconic fighter:
Mike Tyson vs. Rocky Marciano
Born in Brooklyn, Iron Mike was a 5’10” pit bull, the youngest champ in history (20 years, 4 months, 22 days) and the most feared man on the planet before he became a Phil Collins’ karaoke singer on the silver screen. Four decades earlier, the Rock from Brockton (Mass.) was a 5’11” sledgehammer who went 49–0 with 43 KOs, including a win over Joe Louis in 1951.
Edge: Split decision

Verdict:
It looks like Super Bowl XLVI is a winner-take-all showdown for bragging rights in the New York vs. Boston debate — unless Tyson and Rocky somehow find a way to fight in their heavyweight championship primes.

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