College Basketball: Ranking the ACC's Coaches for 2013-14

Get the Athlon Sports Newsletter

Where do Roy Williams, Jim Boeheim rank with Coach K?

Where do Roy Williams, Jim Boeheim rank with Coach K?

ACC expansion solidified the league and added to the depth of both the football and basketball lineups.

The basketball benches, though, is where ACC fans may notice the biggest upgrade. Both of the country’s 900-win coaches now work in the same conference, thanks to the addition of Syracuse and Jim Boeheim. In Pittsburgh’s Jamie Dixon and Notre Dame’s Mike Brey, the ACC also adds two of the nation’s most consistent coaches who have the reputation of doing more with less.

And those are just the three coaches who arrive in 2013-14. Next season, the league will add Louisville’s Rick Pitino.

The lineup of coaches in the ACC has rarely been stronger or deeper, especially considering that in the last two seasons the coaches at Florida State and Miami got the best of their Hall of Fame brethren.

Athlon’s rankings of the coaches in each major conference begins today with the ACC and will continue in the coming weeks before we unveil our list of the top coaches in the country.

*A few things to note as we are ranking coaches: We are attempting to look at the whole package of gameday acumen, recruiting, player development, and regular-season and postseason success. We are also keeping in mind a coach’s career trajectory.

 

And now, on to the debate. Feel free to chime in at @AthlonSports on Twitter or Athlon Sports on Facebook.


RANKING THE ACC COACHES FOR 2013-14

1. Mike Krzyzewski, Duke

Record: 957-238
Record at Duke: 884-238 overall (.788), 350-153 ACC (.696)
NCAA Tournament: 82-25, 11 Final Fours, four national championships
Since 2007, Duke has lost in the NCAA Tournament to an 11th-seeded VCU, seventh-seeded West Virginia and 15th-seeded Lehigh. In that span, Mike Krzyzewski still managed his fourth national title and four 30-win seasons. Krzyzewski has passed Bob Knight on the all-time wins list and now chases Pat Summitt’s 1,098 wins in NCAA basketball. With a preseason top-five team on his hands in 2013-14, Krzyzewski remains at the top of his game.

2. Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
Record (all at Syracuse): 920-314 (.746) overall, 362-191 (.655)
NCAA Tournament: 52-29, four Final Fours, one national championship
Last season was quite a year for Jim Boeheim. He crossed the 900-win mark (joining KrzyzewskI and Knight) and became the fourth coach to take a team to the Final Four in four different decades (joining Rick Pitino, Dean Smith and Krzyzewski). Now, one of the founding fathers of Big East basketball will try his hand at the ACC. In case you were wondering: Boeheim is 3-4 all-time against Duke and North Carolina.

3. Roy Williams, North Carolina
Record: 700-180
Record at North Carolina: 282-79 (.781) overall, 117-45 ACC (.722)
NCAA Tournament: 62-21, seven Final Fours, two national championships
Despite his stellar record, Roy Williams gets knocked for a few things: His teams crumble in the NCAA Tournament, and his teams don’t play defense. To those, we have two retorts. Williams has a better NCAA Tournament record at North Carolina (28-7) than he had at Kansas (34-14), a difference of nearly 10 percent and two national titles. And in 10 seasons under Williams, North Carolina has ranked in the top 25 nationally in Ken Pomeroy’s adjusted defensive efficiency rankings eight times.

4. Jamie Dixon, Pittsburgh
Record (all at Pittsburgh): 262-86 overall (.753), 115-57 (.669) Big East
NCAA Tournament: 11-9
The 2011-12 season turned out to be a blip for Jamie Dixon at Pittsburgh. The Panthers went 5-13 in the Big East and missed the NCAA Tournament for his worst season as Pitt’s head coach. The Panthers quickly rebounded in 2013-14. Overall, a few numbers to consider: Dixon has one more Big East win than Boeheim since Dixon became head coach in 2003-04. Dixon also had 16 more Big East wins than Jim Calhoun from 2003-04 through the UConn coach’s retirement last season. And lastly, Dixon had only three fewer Big East wins (92) than Louisville’s Rick Pitino (95) when both programs were in the league. The only thing that’s missing is postseason success: Dixon has reached the Elite Eight and won Big East Tournament only once each.

5. Jim Larranaga, Miami
Record: 491-329
Record at Miami: 49-20 overall (.710), 24-10 ACC (.706)
NCAA Tournament: 7-6, one Final Four
When Larranaga left George Mason for Miami, it seemed to be a cushy last job before he retired. Turns out Larranaga had a few more surprises. Seven years after taking George Mason to the Final Four, Larranaga won an ACC Tournament and regular-season title at Miami — the last ACC team other than Duke or North Carolina to do both in the same season was a David Thompson-led NC State team in 1974. Nearly as remarkable: Larranaga has had one losing conference season since 1993-94 while at Bowling Green.

6. Leonard Hamilton, Florida State
Record: 419-353
Record at Florida State: 219-143 overall (.605), 89-89 ACC (.500)
NCAA Tournament: 6-7
Hamilton knows something about degree of difficulty: He has won a share of the Big East regular-season title at Miami and an ACC Tournament title at Florida State. After losing seasons in ACC play in five of his first six years at FSU, Hamilton has gone 52-30 in the conference in the last four seasons. The defensive-minded Hamilton turned FSU into a factor in the ACC after more than a decade of irrelevance.

7. Mike Brey, Notre Dame
Record: 384-194
Record at Notre Dame: 285-142 overall (.667), 136-79 Big East (.633)
NCAA Tournament: 6-11
Stability is the name of the game here as Notre Dame has won 20 games in each of the last seven seasons, reached in the NCAA Tournament in six of the last seven years and protected its homecourt. Still, Notre Dame has not reached the second weekend of the NCAA since Brey’s third season in 2003.

8. Tony Bennett, Virginia
Record: 145-86
Record at Virginia: 76-53 overall (.589), 32-34 ACC (.485)
NCAA Tournament: 3-3
Bennett’s preferred style of play isn’t the most exciting, but it is effective. He’s reversed the fortunes of Washington State and Virginia while making stars of Klay Thompson, Mike Smith and Joe Harris. The Cavaliers went 11-7 in the ACC last season, but this could be a breakout season for program that hasn’t reached the Sweet 16 since 1995.

9. Steve Donahue, Boston College
Record: 192-190
Record at Boston College: 46-52 (.469), 20-30 ACC (.400)
NCAA Tournament: 2-3
Donahue is building Boston College in a similar fashion as he did at Cornell — from the ground up. Donahue reached the NIT in his first season at BC, but he’s had one of the nation’s youngest rosters the last two years, and it’s shown. This season could be the turning point after BC went from 4-12 to 7-11 in the ACC a year ago. By his eighth season at Cornell, Donahue began a run where he led the Big Red to three consecutive Ivy League titles and the Sweet 16 in 2010.

10. Mark Turgeon, Maryland
Record: 292-187
Record at Maryland: 42-28 overall (.600), 14-20 ACC (.412)
NCAA Tournament: 5-5
Turgeon hasn’t completed his rebuild of Maryland, but hopes are high even without the No. 5 pick in the NBA Draft in Alex Len in 2013-14. Turgeon took Texas A&M to four consecutive NCAA Tournaments but hasn’t finished higher than seventh in the ACC in two seasons at Maryland.

11. Mark Gottfried, NC State
Record: 326-179
Record at NC State: 48-24 overall (.667), 20-14 ACC (.588)
NCAA Tournament: 7-9
Gottfried raised expectations for a hungry NC State fanbase as the Wolfpack reached the Sweet 16 in 2012 and added a second standout recruiting class. The ACC media’s preseason favorite ended up 11-7 in the league in 2013, and the program lost the core of its team to transfers and the NBA Draft.

12. Brad Brownell, Clemson
Record: 218-130
Record at Clemson: 51-45 overall (.531), 22-28 ACC (.440)
NCAA Tournament record: 1-4
Clemson’s not an easy place to win big, but the Tigers’ win totals — overall and in conference — have decreased in three seasons under Brownell. Clemson went 5-13 in the league last season, and they don’t project to get much better. These are puzzling results or a coach who was a hot commodity for his work at UNC Wilmington and Wright State.

13. Brian Gregory, Georgia Tech
Record: 199-129
Record at Georgia Tech: 27-35 overall (.435), 10-24 ACC (.303)
NCAA Tournament: 1-2
Gregory has Georgia Tech on the upswing, but it’s a long way up from five or six conference wins to NCAA Tournament contention. A former Tom Izzo assistant, Gregory hasn’t reached the NCAA Tournament since 2009 at Dayton.

14. Jeff Bzdelik Wake Forest
Record: 145-165
Record at Wake Forest: 34-60 overall (.362), 10-39 ACC (.204)
NCAA Tournament: 0-1
Bzdelik isn’t a fan favorite at Wake Forest, but the veteran coach hung onto his job after going 6-12 in the ACC. That doesn’t sound like much, but it’s more conference wins than Bzdelik had his first two seasons combined. Four of those wins last season came over NCAA or NIT teams (Miami, NC State, Florida State and Virginia), but Bzdelik is seven seasons removed from his last winning season at Air Force.

15. James Johnson, Virginia Tech
Record (one season at Virginia Tech): 13-19 overall (.406), 4-14 ACC (.222)
Johnson’s tenure is off to a disastrous start after finishing last in the ACC and then getting hit with a second wave of player transfers and recruiting losses in his second offseason.

CBK Conferences: 

More Stories:

Home Page Infinite Scroll Left