Monthly

This is for articles that have appeared in the Monthly

Notre Dame Soccer: Texas Trio

Childhood Friends, Collegiate Champions
<p> At the time, it seemed like silly girl talk. Three middle school friends, all on the same club soccer team, made a pact to play together in college and compete for national championships. None of them envisioned it actually happening, though. After all, those scripts are saved for Hollywood.&nbsp; But, somehow, this one became a reality.</p>
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At the time, it seemed like silly girl talk. Three middle school friends, all on the same club soccer team, made a pact to play together in college and compete for national championships.

None of them envisioned it actually happening, though. After all, those scripts are saved for Hollywood.

Kyle Busch Exclusive Interview

<p> Kyle Busch sat down with Athlon Sports to discuss his drive for success and what he feels needs to change to put himself in a position to win a championship.</p>
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Athlon Sports: Racing has innumerable generational attachments, but it’s pretty rare for two brothers to get to the top. There must be something pretty remarkable in your parents. Is there anything in particular that you learned growing up that, you think, helped you and Kurt competitively?

Dale Earnhardt

Gone but not Forgotten
<p> NASCAR’s annual February pilgrimage to Daytona Beach for the 53rd Daytona 500 will be bittersweet for fans, competitors and officials, as this season’s event marks the 10-year anniversary of the death of the great Dale Earnhardt.</p>
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NASCAR’s annual February pilgrimage to Daytona Beach for the 53rd Daytona 500 will be bittersweet for fans, competitors and officials, as this season’s event marks the 10-year anniversary of the death of the great Dale Earnhardt.

Earnhardt died in a last-lap accident in Turn 4 of the 2001 Daytona 500, as the cars he owned — those of Michael Waltrip and Dale Earnhardt Jr. — finished first and second.

The ensuing outpouring of emotion from a legion of NASCAR fans around the nation opened the eyes of many to the sport, and a boom period followed.

Catching Up with Joe Dudek

Plymouth’s Rock
<p> Before the 2010 football season started, Joe Dudek decided to do something radical with the running backs he coaches at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, N.H. Well, it wasn’t exactly extreme in terms of a normal ball-carrier’s world, but for Dudek it was pretty far out there.</p>

Before the 2010 football season started, Joe Dudek decided to do something radical with the running backs he coaches at Pinkerton Academy in Derry, N.H. Well, it wasn’t exactly extreme in terms of a normal ball-carrier’s world, but for Dudek it was pretty far out there.

He wanted them to block. Imagine that.

“I taught them how to block and graded them on blocking,” he says. “The biggest joke is that I never threw a block in my life.”

Catching Up with Tony Rice

<p> Tony Rice had a decision to make, and he had to make it in a hurry. Should he pitch the ball to tailback Mark Green, or should he hold on to it himself?</p>
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Tony Rice had a decision to make, and he had to make it in a hurry. Should he pitch the ball to tailback Mark Green, or should he hold on to it himself?

USC safety Mark Carrier had made the move to stop the option play, but now the All-America safety had his own decision to make. Should he take the pitch man, Green, or should he attempt to make the tackle on Rice? Carrier hesitated and left himself in no man’s land. Rice made him pay the ultimate price.

Higher Calling

<p> Deep among the hills of the Dominican Republic are a people so poor, so disregarded, they all but don’t exist.&nbsp; Albert Pujols created a foundation dedicated to helping the poorest of the poor in Albert’s home country as well as those with Down syndrome.</p>
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Deep among the hills of the Dominican Republic are a people so poor, so disregarded, they all but don’t exist. Of Haitian origin, they were enticed by offers of good jobs but instead were brought in to work the sugar fields and left to fend for themselves in slums known as bateyes. Men spend long days in the fields, looking for work, or in bars. Women, many just teenagers with little to no education, have multiple children, fathered by workers passing through.

Living on the Edge

Kentucky's John Calipari
<p> John Calipari is attracting big-time talent and winning a ton of games, but can his formula produce a national title?</p>

Here he goes again, loading up the roster with a bunch of rookies and heading off in search of great things. He really has no idea how it’s going to work, because how do you teach a bunch of kids barely old enough to vote how to own the big time?

The Drive for Five

Johnson, Knaus dynasty transcends NASCAR
<p> Jimmie Johnson sits on the verge of history.</p> <p> Check that. Jimmie Johnson has passed the “verge” — he’s sailing into uncharted waters.</p>
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Johnson’s four consecutive NASCAR Sprint Cup championships are a feat never achieved in the 61-year history of the sport. Not by the sport’s king, Richard Petty. Not by the sport’s most beloved and ruthless competitor, Dale Earnhardt. And not by Johnson’s mentor and modern day NASCAR archetype, Jeff Gordon.

In fact, winning four titles consecutively in any professional league is almost unheard of in today’s sports landscape. But Johnson already has four in the bag, and is aiming — with deadly accuracy — at a fifth.

Dwyane Wade Exclusive Interview

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He’s already been to the top. Now he’s preparing for the Big Top. After the Heat picked him fifth overall out of Marquette in 2003, Dwyane Wade didn’t take long to become one of the league’s elite players, or a champion. In the 2006 NBA Finals, against Dallas, he almost single-handedly rallied the Heat from a 2–0 series deficit, averaging 34.7 points and winning the MVP. In the four years since, he’s suffered serious knee and shoulder injuries, dealt with several off-the-court distractions — including a contentious and public divorce — and not won nearly as much as he’d like.

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