Publish date:

11 Reasons You Will Miss the BCS

Author:
SabanN.jpg

When the confetti canons launch at the Rose Bowl tonight, fans at home may want to launch into celebrations of their own that have nothing to do with Florida State and Auburn.

Goodbye, BCS. Hello, playoff.

Anticipation for the first playoff in college football playoff will dominate the entire season. BCS may as well be a swear word starting Jan. 7.

This is all with good reason. The BCS, for the most part, brought together some of the most ridiculous and cynical aspects of college football since 1998. College football continued to outsource its postseason to the bowls with the BCS organizers hoping a measly two-team, one-game playoff would be enough to preserve the system. The polls still played an outsized role in deciding the national champion, but the system still failed to satisfy fans. Politicking seemed to mean as much as the games.

History may judge the BCS as simply a stopgap between the old game and a new game. Maybe it will be a cultural curiosity worthy of a “30 for 30.”

For today, we think it deserves a tiny sliver of credit.

Reasons you’ll miss the BCS

The BCS finally brought us No. 1 vs. No. 2
For all its frustrations, the BCS was good for college football. The BCS set out to match up the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in the polls (while preserving the crooked bowl system, but that’s another day). Before the BCS and its precursors the Bowl Alliance and Bowl Coalition, the top two teams in the country met in a bowl game only eight times between 1936-92. Before then, the Big Ten and Pac-10 champs went to the Rose, the SEC to the Sugar, the Southwest to the Cotton and the Big Eight to the Orange — the rankings be damned. As flawed as the selection process was, the BCS essentially guaranteed a winner-take-all national championship game.

The BCS (almost) ended split national champions
Split champions decided by competing polls. Ponder the absurdity: These coaches voted one team the best. These writers picked another one. And that’s that. They’re both champions. In two seasons in 1990-91, four teams claimed national championships. Same in 1973-74. Three teams have national championship banners from 1970. Three different teams have banners from 1964. In one 20-year period from 1954-74, 11 seasons featured split national champions. The BCS brought only one split national championship in 16 years when LSU won the BCS title and USC won the AP title in 2003. A bummer that year, but not a bad record overall.

The BCS standings usually got it right for the championship game
Fans often wished for “BCS chaos,” some sort of scenario where five undefeated or one-loss teams in major conferences at the end of the regular season would send the whole system crashing down. Such a scenario never would have guaranteed that result, and it never happened, anyway. The BCS finished its final decade without any major screw-ups for the title game matchup. But what about Auburn in 2004, you say? Three undefeated teams in one season meant someone was going to draw the short straw among the Tigers, USC and Oklahoma. At least Auburn was third in both polls and the computers that year. Feel free to argue about Oklahoma reaching the 2008 title game, but the BCS standings became a factor only because the Big 12 used the rankings as a tiebreaker among OU, Texas and Texas Tech for the South Division crown. Blame the Big 12. The SEC rematch in 2011 wasn’t ideal, but at least No. 2 Alabama delivered on its second chance against LSU.

The BCS intensified college football as a national game
Why would Auburn find it necessary to root against Ohio State in the Big Ten title game in 2013? Why would an LSU and Ohio State fans in 2007 suddenly become enthralled with the Big 12 title game and a Backyard Brawl involving a Pittsburgh team with a losing record. The BCS demanded fans take note of conferences, even if the debate usually ended with “my conference good, your conference bad.”

The BCS did have a playoff ... in conference championship games
Granted, this mostly took place in the SEC, but the game in Atlanta became de facto semifinals in 2013 (Auburn over Missouri), 2012 (Alabama over Georgia), 2009 (Alabama over Florida) and 2008 (Florida over Alabama). The Big Ten got into the action one year when a No. 1 Ohio State faced a No. 2 Michigan on the last regular season day of 2006.

The BCS forced the Big Ten to modernize
Speaking of the 2006 Ohio State-Michigan game — that matchup was played on Nov. 18 of that season. Michigan was still No. 2 in the BCS the week following the 42-39 loss. No. 3 USC and No. 4 Florida still had two games to play. USC lost its spot in the title game with a loss to UCLA on Dec. 2, but Florida defeated Florida State on the road and Arkansas in the SEC championship game. While Michigan was idle for two weeks, Florida had plenty of time to win (and talk) its way into the BCS Championship Game. The Big Ten decided to abandon its tradition of ending its season before Thanksgiving rather than risk being out of sight and out of mind again.

Conference expansion
An unintended consequence of the BCS was the realignment mess that defined most of the last 10 years, starting with the first ACC raid of the Big East for Miami, Virginia Tech and Boston College through Louisville landing in the ACC in 2014. We learned university presidents will abandon rivalries, geography and accurately named conferences in pursuit of television money, but a handful of the moves aren’t so bad. Texas A&M and Missouri have been resounding successes in the SEC despite skepticism. Nebraska fits just fine in the Big Ten. And Louisville, TCU and Utah finally got into big-time conferences. Some programs may fall apart in their new conferences — West Virginia and Rutgers the top candidates at this point — but you can’t win them all.

Boise State, Utah and TCU gave upstarts a new goal
LaVell Edwards built one of the most consistent programs in the country in the 1980s, but the best BYU could hope for was the Holiday Bowl, no matter the Cougars’ record. BYU won a national championship in 1984 but lacked for great bowl matchups throughout that run. The major conferences eventually had to have their arms twisted to give non-automatic qualifying teams a chance. Boise State, Utah and TCU took advantage by going a combined 5-1 in the BCS, the lone loss Boise State defeating TCU in the Fiesta. Utah beat Alabama in the Sugar, Boise State beat Oklahoma in a classic Fiesta Bowl and TCU won the Rose Bowl. Sure, appearances by Hawaii and Northern Illinois were duds, but the BCS turned three programs into teams with national intrigue.

The BCS brought accountability in the coaches’ poll
With two-thirds of the BCS formula coming from polls, the BCS era brought greater accountability with the coaches’ poll. USA Today for the first time revealed the individual final regular season ballots for every coach. Accountability and transparency is a good thing, even if we learned coaches (or their surrogates) usually gave their teams a boost while voting for their own conference and coaching pals.

This...


...and this

Recommended Articles