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Oregon's Offense Suffers Setback With RB Thomas Tyner's Injury

Thomas Tyner

Thomas Tyner

Oregon has yet to open fall camp, but the offense has already suffered a big loss. According to a report from CSNNW.com, running back Thomas Tyner will miss all of 2015 with a shoulder injury.

Tyner missed part of 2014 due to a shoulder injury but was a key cog in the Ducks’ run to the national championship game. The report indicates Tyner continued to have pain in his shoulder and decided to have surgery. The talented junior should have two seasons of eligibility remaining once he returns in 2016.

In 11 games last season, Tyner rushed for 573 yards and five scores. After missing the final three contests of the regular season, Tyner gashed Florida State for 124 yards and added 62 on the ground versus Ohio State.

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Losing Tyner is a significant setback for Oregon. The Ducks were already sorting out a quarterback battle between Jeff Lockie and Vernon Adams this fall, and the offensive line lost its top two players – Jake Fisher and Hroniss Grasu – from last season.

While Tyner will be missed, Oregon still has plenty of capable options in the backfield. Sophomore Royce Freeman is one of the nation’s most talented running backs, and freshmen Tony Brooks-James and Taj Griffin are intriguing options. Additionally, receiver Byron Marshall could shift back to running back for a few carries.

Losing Tyner doesn’t hurt Oregon’s chances of winning the Pac-12 North, but it’s a setback for one of the nation’s best backfields. Without Tyner, Freeman will have to shoulder more of the workload. And if Freeman has to miss any snaps, the inexperienced duo of Brooks-James and Griffin will have to take on the bulk of the carries.

The Ducks certainly have their share of question marks in replacing Mariota, along with new faces on the offensive line and on defense. However, the rest of the North also has their share of concerns. Losing Tyner is a setback, but Oregon is still the team to beat in the Pac-12 North.