5 Wide Receiver Replacements for Fantasy Owners With Keenan Allen on Team

Chargers' No. 1 WR reportedly tore his ACL on Sunday

For many fantasy owners, Keenan Allen was the first wide receiver they took in their drafts. Unfortunately, it appears that Allen will now be lost for the season with a torn ACL. While that has yet to be officially confirmed from the team, that's is the early indication, which means Allen owners will be scrambling to find a replacement on the waiver wire this week.

 

While Travis Benjamin (75 percent owned) is likely replacement for the team, fantasy owners may need to look elsewhere based on his high ownership rate. Willie Snead (80 percent owned) would be a great fill-in, but again, he's likely owned as well. And to add further injury to the intrigue, there are reports circulating that Sammy Watkins could miss some time because of discomfort he is feeling in his surgically repaired foot. Not even one full week into the season and fantasy owners could be down two WR1s. 

 

So what is a frustrated Allen (and possibly Watkins) owner to do? Here are five WRs that are less than 50 percent owned and may be available:

 

Will Fuller, WR, Houston Texans (50 percent owned)

In his debut, Fuller led the team in targets (11, three more than DeAndre Hopkins) and receiving (107 yards). He also scored a touchdown and looks to be one of Brock Osweiler's favorite targets when Hopkins is being double- or triple-covered. Fuller has historically had a problem with drops, and this did show a bit on Sunday, but when he's seeing double-digit targets, a drop or two can be forgiven. He should be a waiver priority if he's available.

 

Tajae Sharpe, WR, Tennessee Titans (46 percent owned)

Another rookie who led his team in targets (11) and yards (76). Sharpe was a quiet rookie sleeper, but after Week 1, his ownership percentage will likely skyrocket. He's the No. 1 receiver in an offense that has desperately been searching for one. He's going to be involved in the game each week, and Allen owners could at least feel comfortable with Sharpe in their lineups each week.

 

Mohammed Sanu, WR, Atlanta Falcons (45 percent owned)

Whether it was because Julio Jones was banged up or the Falcons just wanted to get Sanu more involved, time will tell, but after Week 1, the former Bengal looked like a solid No. 2 receiver in Atlanta. He had as many targets as Jones (eight each) and did find the end zone (and a two-point conversion). Sanu suffered what looked to be an ankle injury, so before rushing to pick him up, be sure that he's on track to play for Week 2 (especially if you need to fill a WR slot in a starting roster).

 

Victor Cruz, WR, New York Giants (19 percent owned)

The other three guys are owned in about half of fantasy leagues, so Cruz is an option if the waiver wire looks a little bleak. After missing all last season, Cruz finally returned on Sunday. He had four targets, the same as rookie Sterling Shepard, but he scored a touchdown. It wasn't a spectacular showing, but since Shepard didn't look spectacular either, Cruz will still be fighting for the No. 2 spot in the Giants' offense, which is enough for fantasy owners to consider the former elite (2011-12) fantasy option as a replacement for Allen.

 

Chris Hogan, WR, New England Patriots (31 percent owned)

For those too wary of Cruz but unable to grab any of the other guys,  Hogan may be an option. His success in Week 1 was likely the result of Rob Gronkowski being out, however, Gronk owners know that he's no sure thing to play the next 15 games. Hogan is a No. 2 receiver in New England, but may be a WR4 for fantasy. The Patriots will throw the ball a lot, regardless of who is at quarterback and Hogan caught three of his four targets. It's not a sure thing, but he could be a decent fill-in.

 

— Written by Sarah Lewis, who is part of the Athlon Contributor network and lives, eats, and breathes fantasy football. She also writes for SoCalledFantasyExperts.com among other sites. Have a fantasy football question? Send it to her on Twitter @Sarah_Lewis32.

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