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Best Baseball Players 35 and Over

Author:
Victor Martinez

Victor Martinez

Derek Jeter has retired, but MLB still has plenty of elder statesmen who are proving that age is just a number. While the crop of younger superstars and impact players continues to grow, there are more than enough “old” guys still getting the job done. Don’t believe me? Take a look at the list below and one could put together a pretty solid All-Star team of players who are 35 years old and over, starting with a trio of sluggers who combined for nearly 100 home runs last season.

Related: 25 Best Baseball Players 25 and Under

So with all due respect to MLB’s elders, here is one fan’s list of the best baseball players who are at least 35 years old as of Opening Day (April 6).

Opening Day (April 6) age listed in parentheses

1. David Ortiz, DH/1B, Boston Red Sox (39)

Big Papi turns 40 in November, but age has yet to catch up to his mighty bat. Ortiz cranked out 35 home runs last season and drove in 104, making it the second straight season he had gone 30-100. The heart and soul of the Red Sox, Ortiz is 34 home runs shy of 500 in his remarkable career.

2. Victor Martinez, DH/1B, Detroit Tigers (36)

Martinez was nothing short of spectacular last season, batting .335 with a career-high 35 home runs and 103 RBIs, finishing second in the AL MVP voting to Mike Trout. The power was the most surprising aspect of Martinez’ production, as he had hit only 13 the year before. Basically a full-time DH, VMart should continue to produce at the plate, provided he shows no ill affects from the surgery he underwent in February to repair a torn meniscus in his left knee.

3. Albert Pujols, 1B/DH, Los Angeles Angels (35)

The only one on this list who even approaches Pujols’ career numbers is Ortiz. However, there’s no debate that “The Machine” is not the player he once was. But then again, Pujols in his prime was truly something special, as evidenced by the fact that his 2014 line of .272-28-105 is considered a “down” year. Pujols’ best days may be behind him, but he’s still a very good hitter and someone pitchers don’t care to face.

4. Adrian Beltre, 3B, Texas Rangers (35)

Beltre turns 36 the day after Opening Day and he will start his 18th season just five home runs shy of 400. Beltre has been a model of consistency over the past five seasons, averaging .316-29-96 with a .899 OPS during this span, to go along with four All-Star invites and two Gold Gloves. The run production (19 HR, 77 RBI) was down somewhat last season, but that should bounce back with better health and lineup protection around him.

5. Matt Holliday, OF, St. Louis Cardinals (35)

Holliday has now hit 20 or more home runs in nine straight seasons. A career .308 hitter, he is 29 shy of 300 round-trippers while continuing to show a knack for getting on base (.370 OBP in 2014). Holliday also has averaged 95 RBIs and 90 runs scored over the last three seasons, while remaining a mainstay (454 GP of a possible 486) in the heart of the Cardinals’ lineup.

6. Jayson Werth, OF, Washington Nationals (35)

Werth got off to a rough start in Washington after signing a seven-year, $126 million contract in 2011. He slumped at the plate his first season (.232-20-58) before a broken wrist limited him to just 81 games in ’12. Since then, however, Werth has averaged a respectable .304-20-82 with an OBP of .396. He may never hit 30 home runs, but Werth has become a key piece in the Nationals’ lineup.

7. Torii Hunter, OF, Minnesota Twins (39)

After two productive years in Detroit, Hunter is back in Minnesota with the team that drafted him 20th overall in the 1993 draft. The Gold Glove standard in center field from 2001-09, Hunter has batted .301 over his last three seasons. He may no longer be an All-Star, but Hunter won’t hurt a team with his bat or glove either.

8. Jimmy Rollins, SS, Los Angeles Dodgers (36)

For the first time since 2003, Rollins will have a new double-play partner, as his offseason trade to the Dodgers broke him and Chase Utley up after 1,187 games together with the Phillies. Rollins’ best days at the plate are behind him, but he’s still capable of providing both power (17 HR in 2014) and speed (28 SB) from the leadoff spot for his new team. The four-time Gold Glove recipient also will greatly improve the Dodgers’ infield defense.

9. Chase Utley, 2B, Philadelphia Phillies (36)

Injuries have taken their toll, but Utley showed last season that he still has something left in the tank. He was named to his sixth All-Star team on his way to batting .270 with 11 home runs, 78 RBIs and 10 stolen bases. Additionally, the 155 games played were his most since 2009. He may no longer be the power hitter he once was, but Utley still led all NL second baseman in RBIs and extra-base hits (53), and he continues to provide solid defense.

10. Mark Buehrle, P, Toronto Blue Jays (36)

Buehrle has won at least 10 games and pitched 201 or more innings in 14 straight seasons. He made his fifth All-Star team last season, going 13-10 with a 3.39 ERA in 32 starts. He’s never piled up the strikeouts in his career, but he rarely hurts himself with free passes (career 2.54 SO/BB ratio) either.

11. Adam LaRoche, 1B/DH, Chicago White Sox (35)

LaRoche signed with the White Sox after enjoying a successful four-year run with the Nationals. Following an injury-shortened 2011, LaRoche averaged 26 home runs and 85 RBIs for Washington, while providing Gold Glove-caliber defense at first.

12. Fernando Rodney, P, Seattle Mariners (38)

Rodney won just one game in seven decisions last season, but he also led the majors with 48 saves. An All-Star in his first season with the Mariners, Rodney matched his career high in saves while posting a 2.85 ERA.

13. Koji Uehara, P, Boston Red Sox (40)

Not as dominant as he was during Boston’s World Series run in 2013, Uehara still collected 26 saves while posting a 2.52 ERA last season. The Japanese import continues to baffle hitters, as evidenced by his 80 strikeouts and only eight walks (0.917 WHIP) in 64 1/3 innings.

14. Michael Cuddyer, OF/1B, New York Mets (36)

The 2013 NL batting champion (.331) played in just 49 games last season after breaking his left shoulder socket diving for a ball. The good news is that Cuddyer maintained his hitting stroke (.332-10-31) in the 190 at-bats he got, so the Mets are hoping their new starting left fielder will pick up where he left off.

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15. Kyle Lohse, P, Milwaukee Brewers (36)

Lohse has never been an All-Star but that shouldn’t diminish the consistency he has shown on the mound. He’s won 11 or more games four straight seasons, including 2014’s 13-9 record. He’s not a strikeout artist (141 K in 198 1/3 IP), but he doesn’t walk many batters (45) either and he also tossed two complete game shutouts.

16. John Lackey, P, St. Louis Cardinals (36)

Lackey actually fared better in the AL with the Red Sox (11-7, 3.60 ERA) than he did following his July 31 trade to the Cardinals (3-3, 4.30 ERA). However, a full season in the NL and with Yadier Molina behind the plate should help Lackey post double-digit wins for the 12th time in his career.

17. Aramis Ramirez, 3B, Milwaukee Brewers (36)

Ramirez announced prior to spring training that his 18th season will be his last. A three-time All-Star and a career .285 hitter, Ramirez will probably come short of 400 home runs, as he enters this season with 369. When healthy, Ramirez is still a productive hitter that can provide solid defense at the hot corner.

18. Marlon Byrd, OF, Cincinnati Reds (37)

The offseason trade to the Reds means Byrd will play for his sixth team in four seasons. Following a disappointing 2012 marred by a 50-game suspension, Byrd has discovered his power stroke, clubbing 49 home runs over the last two seasons.

19. Bartolo Colon, P, New York Mets (41)

The seemingly ageless Colon will turn 42 in late May and will still probably make his usual 25-30 starts for the Mets. A 15-game winner last season, Colon was both durable (202 1/3 IP in 2014) and fairly precise (30 BB) with his location in his return to the NL after pitching nine seasons in the AL.

20. R.A. Dickey, P, Toronto Blue Jays (40)

Dickey hasn’t been able to repeat his 2012 NL Cy Young form, but he’s gone 14-13 in each of his first two seasons with the Blue Jays. The knuckleballer has given up a fair number of hits, but he’s been durable (68 GS, 440 1/3 IP in 2013-14) and has gotten his share of swings and misses (350 K) too.

Best of the Rest

(alphabetical order)

Carlos Beltran, DH/OF, New York Yankees (37)

Basically a full-time DH now, Beltran’s production took a nosedive last season, going from .296-24-84 in 2013 to just .233-15-49 (in 109 G).

Jason Grilli, P, Pittsburgh Pirates (38)

Replaced by Mark Melancon as the Pirates’ closer, Grilli rebounded some following a trade to the Angels, posting a 3.48 ERA and 1.16 WHIP in 40 games with his new team.

Ryan Howard, 1B, Philadelphia Phillies (35)

After playing in just 151 games in 2012-13, Howard appeared in 153 last season, finishing with 23 home runs and 95 RBIs, but also leading the majors with 190 strikeouts and hitting just .223.

Cliff Lee, P, Philadelphia Phillies (36)

This is more a tip of the cap, as it’s possible Lee’s career is coming to an end. He has been placed on the 60-day DL with a left forearm strain and also is dealing with a tear in the flexor tendon. The 2008 AL Cy Young Award winner is 143-91 with a 3.65 ERA and 1.20 WHIP in 13 seasons.

Joe Nathan, P, Detroit Tigers (40)

Despite collecting 35 saves, Nathan’s first season with the Tigers didn’t go as planned, as he finished with a 4.81 ERA and 1.53 WHIP.

Ichiro Suzuki, OF, Miami Marlins (41)

Suzuki will continue his pursuit of 3,000 hits (156 shy) with the Marlins after 14 seasons in the AL playing for the Mariners and Yankees.