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Commissioner Silver Brings 24-Game Hammer Down on Jeff Taylor, Domestic Violence

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NBA Commissioner Adam Silver hasn’t been on the job for a year yet, but he’s already made a strong impression. 

Most of that is due to his swift, judicial action in regards to the Donald Sterling scandal. His lifetime ban of Sterling branded Silver as a man of conviction, and now he’s extending that reputation with his harsh penalizing of Jeff Taylor, the Charlotte Hornets forward who was found guilty, last month, of misdemeanor domestic violence assault and malicious destruction of hotel property. Taylor confessed to the crimes in court by pleading guilty.

Silver hit Taylor with a 24-game, no-pay suspension for his behavior. In a press release, Silver described his decision thusly: "This suspension is necessary to protect the interests of the NBA and the public's confidence in it. Mr. Taylor's conduct violates applicable law and, in my opinion, does not conform to standards of morality and is prejudicial and detrimental to the NBA.”

The NBA, as you likely know, is not the sport most plagued by the issue of domestic violence, Ray Rice and others have made stretches of the 2014 NFL season almost unpalatable with the unsavory details of abuse. Mr. Taylor, unlike Rice, is not terribly important to his team, or to his league’s image. He’s a relative unknown, and it’s worth wondering whether the Commish would bring such a steep punishment upon someone who the common fan has actually heard of before. Such an occurrence would actually do damage to the sport’s image; hitting Taylor hard, to the contrary, is a way of making highly attentive fans aware that Silver means business. But those outside the hard core of NBA followers probably won’t ever hear about this event. 

Silver hasn’t done anything to suggest he’s anything less than a progressive moral warrior, yet. His early record with touchy issues has actually been quite laudable. But his real P.R. test will come when he has to make a choice about one of the more beloved faces of his game — not an already reviled character like Sterling, or an anonymous one like Taylor.

Information from AP reports was used here.

— John Wilmes

@johnwilmesNBA

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