The NBA Has Become a League of Parity

The James-Wade-Bosh Heat Wouldn't Happen Today

The 2011 NBA Lockout was about a lot of things — money and power, mostly — and one of its sub-missions was to decentralize power in the league. When LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh pooled their talents at the top of their games to make for a mini-dynasty with the Miami Heat (a squad that went to visit the NBA Finals four years in a row), the game’s owners wanted to do something to prevent similar future occurences.

 

 

Today, the measures they took seem to have worked. A complex, restricting salary cap structure that heavily taxes teams who color outside the lines has made for extremely fluid player movement. Keeping a ton of great players together is harder than it’s ever been, and the 2015 version of the NBA will enjoy a wide-open landscape, in which several teams are equally likely to win a championship.

Title contenders this season include James’ Cleveland Cavaliers (however much they may be struggling lately), the Chicago Bulls, Golden State Warriors, Memphis Grizzlies, Oklahoma City Thunder, Houston Rockets, Portland Trail Blazers, Washington Wizards, Dallas Mavericks, the defending champion San Antonio Spurs — the list could go on, so don’t feel slighted if your team isn’t on it. They probably belong there.

If any new teams repeat the Heat’s feat, you can color this columnist surprised. Annual free agency madness and the ever-shifting economics of the sport make things less and less predictable in the modern NBA. And, business-wise, this benefits the bottom line. Less fixed results means more fan intrigue, higher Vegas action, and greater growth potential for every franchise. Pro basketball is starting to achieve something like its ideal, dream state of affairs as an exciting, turbulent product, with elite talent in constant motion on the court and off.

 

— John Wilmes

@johnwilmesNBA

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