10 Great NFL Players Who Were Disappointments in 2014

We had such high hopes this season

In a league overflowing with parity and dominated (mostly) by youth, the NFL tends to be an organization of mood swings. One moment a player is on top of the world, heading toward a Pro Bowl season or a lucrative, multi-year contract.

The next, they find themselves on this list, as one of the biggest disappointments of the year.

It happens to a lot of players: Great ones, and ones with great expectations; Pro Bowl players, or ones who were just headed in that direction. As always, there were a lot of things to be disappointed about this season.

Here are 10 who were as disappointing as any in the league:

 

QB Colin Kaepernick, 49ers

Three straight trips to the NFC championship game and one trip to the Super Bowl seemingly cemented him as being on the verge of greatness, and the things he could do with his arm and his legs made many believe he signaled the arrival of the next generation of quarterback weapons. Then this season he stopped winning and even seemed to slow down when running (until his big game against San Diego last weekend). Mostly, though, the offense wilted under his direction. His stats are middling with one game to go and he may not even reach 20 touchdown passes – not good for the quarterback on what was supposed to be one of the best teams in the league.

 

RB Reggie Bush, Lions

He had three straight seasons of 1,000 rushing yards (OK, one was 986, but still …) and a year ago he was such a dual threat he had 1,500 total yards, too. Then this year, as his injuries returned, he has 278 rushing yards and 231 receiving yards and he’s no longer much of a threat in either area. He’s also going to be 30 in March and after a brief career revival it looks once again like he’ll never live up to his promise and hype.

 

QB Andy Dalton, Bengals

He got a six-year, $96 million contract extension in August, and then looked terrific as Cincinnati got off to a 3-0 start. Since then? Not so good. Passer rating isn’t everything, but in that category he ranks behind the likes of Mark Sanchez, Austin Davis, Zach Mettenberger and Mike Glennon. He has thrown 17 touchdown passes in 15 games and 15 interceptions. He doesn’t look like a franchise quarterback anymore, and if the Bengals had waited just two more months he’d never have gotten a deal that size.

 

TE Vernon Davis, 49ers

There certainly are a lot of disappointing players in San Francisco, in what surely will end up being Jim Harbaugh’s final season. Davis might be one of the biggest and, quite possibly, one of the biggest mysteries. Over the previous five seasons he had established himself as a dangerous weapon. Last year he had 850 receiving yards, an impressive 16.3 yards per catch and 13 touchdowns. Now? He’s an after thought. His 25 catches for 236 yards and two TDs, not to mention a yards-per-catch average of just 9.4, add up to his worst season since his injury shortened rookie year.

 

RB Doug Martin, Buccaneers

Another injury-plagued season has ruined the value of this former star who memorably had 1,454 yards and 11 touchdowns as a rookie. This season he’ll be lucky to top the 456 he had last season. Granted, after last year’s disaster maybe this should’ve been expected. But he did play 10 games, just not very well. He starts, but he doesn’t do much and has averaged just 3.4 yards per carry, making him a truly awful part of one of the worst teams in the league.

 

QB Cam Newton, Panthers

Before the accident and the fractured back, Newton had responded since his excellent 2013 season by dipping back to his 2012 levels. His completion percentage is back under 60 and he’s got just 17 touchdowns and 12 interceptions. Yes, he lost his best receiver, Steve Smith, but he replaced him with a superb rookie in Kelvin Benjamin. This was supposed to be Newton’s arrival as an elite quarterback. Instead, he’s led the Panthers to a losing record in the worst division in the NFL.

 

WR Michael Crabtree, 49ers

He was supposed to be one of the next great receiving super stars when he was drafted 10th overall in 2009. Now, after a couple of good years, he’s clearly not much more than a possession receiver. His 64 catches are OK, especially with a struggling quarterback. But for 657 yards and just a 10.3 yards per catch average? That’s a career low and an indication that he either has no ability to shake a tackler or he’s lost his speed.

WR Rueben Randle, Giants

It was all set up for the former second-round pick, especially after Victor Cruz got hurt. Instead, rookie Odell Beckham breezed past him. Even worse, Randle couldn’t take advantage of defenses leaving him alone and focusing on the Giants’ first-round pick. He has just 65 catches for 780 yards and three touchdowns through 15 games, which are decent numbers, but not for a guy who could’ve been his team’s No. 1. Worse, he’s been benched twice for the first quarter of a game by his coach for unspecified violations of team rules.

 

DE Jared Allen, Bears

Age has caught up to him at 32 as he’s seen his playing time reduced and he’s on his first single-digit sack season since 2006. He had started to tail off for the Vikings a year ago, but still managed 11.5 sacks. Now he’s down to 5.5 in 14 games.

 

RB LeSean McCoy, Eagles

It’s not that he’s having a bad season (1,220 rushing yards with a game to go), it’s that he’s not living up to the hype of a star back in what was supposed to be the NFL’s most dangerous offense. And for the first five games of the season he was average, with just 273 yards. He eventually got going, but still had only four 100-yard games and won’t approach the 1,607 yards he had a year earlier. He also will likely be under 200 receiving yards – and he hadn’t finished under 300 once in his entire career.
 

—by Ralph Vacchiano

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