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10 Unlikely Stadiums That Deserve to Host the Super Bowl

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Miami and New Orleans have hosted more Super Bowls than any place else, with 10 each. Los Angeles has snagged seven Super Bowls. So 27 of the 47 NFL championships have been decided in just three cities. No other city has hosted more than four Super Bowls. Certainly, NOLA, South Beach and SoCal all have plenty to offer the fans, celebrities, athletes and corporate fat cats who descend upon Super Sunder.

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But today the NFL announced its historic and prestigious Super Bowl L — or Super Bowl 50 for those who stopped using Roman numerals the second they graduated from elementary school — will be hosted by…

Santa Clara?

The 50th Anniversary Super Bowl will be played in a suburb 40 miles away with no current football stadium?

Okay, technically, it’s San Francisco’s Super Bowl. And the main reason it won the bidding is the $1.2 billion state-of-the-art stadium the city is building that will be the new home of the San Francisco 49ers. Levi’s Stadium, along with heavy financial backing from Silicon Valley powerhouses like Apple and Google, promises to deliver an unforgettable experience.

This will be just the second time a Super Bowl was hosted in the San Francisco Bay Area. Super Bowl XIX (19) was played in Stanford Stadium in 1985 when Joe Montana and the Niners defeated the Dolphins 38-16. Stanford, one of the best teams in college football the last two years, was 57th in the nation in average attendance at 43,343 in 2012. 

So it got me thinking — which is always dangerous — about my dream scenario for the greatest game of football played each year.

If I were in complete control and could pick any place in the world to play the Super Bowl, where would it be?

Here is what I came up with—and yes, I know some aren't stadiums but this is my dream, so deal with it—in no particular order:

1. Bristol Motor Speedway
Location: Bristol, Tenn.
Capacity: 165,000
Host: NASCAR

It isn’t the biggest sports venue in the world — that honor belongs to the 400,000-seat Indianapolis Motorspeedway — but no other racing venue provides the sightlines and intimate atmosphere like Thunder Valley. There have long been rumors of college football powers Virginia Tech and Tennessee battling in Bristol, so why wouldn’t a Super Bowl work inside the massive half-mile track? There isn’t a bad seat in the house. Does the surrounding area lack in nightlife, places to eat, hotels and overall excitement? Yes. But the stadium itself would be a sight to behold.

2. Lambeau Field
Location: Green Bay, Wisc.
Capacity: 79,594
Host: Green Bay Packers

This will never happen because there aren’t enough front yards to park cars for an event like the Super Bowl. It might also be 12-degrees below zero during the month of February. But this cathedral of football is the most spectacular, most historic, most beloved stadium in the history of the NFL. The Frozen Tundra will never come close to hosting a game like the Super Bowl, but there is little argument that it’s not the best football stadium this country has ever constructed — and it would be bizarre to see Super Sunday invade the sleepy northern Wisconsin town.

3. Churchill Downs
Location: Louisville, Ky.
Capacity: 164,858
Host: The Kentucky Derby

There are few venues that combine to offer what the famed horse track can provide. Louisville is a centrally located city in the heart of the country with plenty to do and a blossoming downtown. Churchill Downs can seat nearly 165,000 people and is one of the most tradition-laden venues in all of sports. It has the infield for the common folk to party and Millionaire's Row for the glitz and glam of a Super Bowl.

4. Camp Nou
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Capacity: 100,001
Host: FC Barcelona

Wembley Stadium in London has history and already has hosted American football games, but Camp Nou is the largest European Stadium and is located in… well, Barcelona instead of London. Michael Jackson, U2, Bruce Springsteen and The Pope all played in front of 90,000-plus audiences at Camp Nou and the city is not only capable of hosting an event like the Super Bowl (see the 1992 Olympics) but it would blow fans away. One of the most beautiful, picturesque and oldest cities in the world would have something for all ages to enjoy. All of this on the Mediterranean coast? Sign me up please.

5. Tiger Stadium
Location: Baton Rouge, La.
Capacity: 92,542
Host: LSU Tigers

Neyland Stadium in Knoxville is the biggest. Sanford Stadium in Athens is the most picturesque. Bryant-Denny in Tuscaloosa is the most successful. But for gameday atmosphere, there is nothing quite like Death Valley at night in the SEC. The food, culture, fans, smells and Richter Scale inducing noise echoing from LSU’s Tigers Stadium is second to none. Among the nation’s best college football venue’s, this one might be the best.

6. Wrigley Field
Location: Chicago, Ill.
Capacity: 102,500
Host: Chicago Cubs

Fenway Park would be great but doesn't have the same football ability that Wrigley brings to the table. Football is already being played there and recently approved upgrades will make this an excellent confluence of history, timeliness and amenities. Located in the heart of one of America's greatest cities, there is no reason to think this wouldn't be an extremely memorable Super Bowl.