70 Best Two-Sport Athletes of All-Time

Where does Oklahoma’s Heisman winner and MLB first-round pick Kyler Murray rank?

Kyler Murray is a bona fide two-sport star. Oklahoma’s reigning Heisman Trophy winner recently declared for the 2019 NFL Draft, as an undersized dual-threat QB. But the 21-year-old was also selected by the Oakland A’s with the No. 9 overall pick in the 2018 MLB Draft, as a fleet-footed toolsy center fielder. Murray is the latest in a long line of two-sport stars.

 

Here’s a ranking of history’s most accomplished two-sport athletes of all-time, using the following scoring criteria:

 

50 – Pro Hall of Famer or Olympic Gold Medalist

40 – College Hall of Famer, College National Player of the Year, Pro All-Star, Olympic Medalist or Contributor to Pro Championship Contender

30 – Pro First-Round Pick, Middling Pro, Olympic Participant, College All-American or Contributor to College Championship Contender

20 – College All-Conference or National High School All-Star

10 – Middling College/Minor League or Local High School All-Star

 

The respective scores for each sport were combined to give a final score for each athlete, with 100 being the maximum. From there, the rankings within each tier are subjective. Many of these athletes were eventually forced to focus on one sport. But for this exercise, production is valued over potential. (Bo knows he should be ranked higher.)

 

1. Jim Thorpe, Football-Track

Born in 1887, Thorpe is one of the iconic tall tales of sports history. He is a member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame and has been immortalized by the Jim Thorpe Award — given annually to the top defensive back in college football. Thorpe was also a gold medalist in both the pentathlon and decathlon at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics.

Score: 100

Football: 50; Track: 50

 

2. Babe Didrikson Zaharias, Golf-Track

A 10-time LPGA major champion and member of the World Golf Hall of Fame, Mildred Ella — better known as “Babe” — won gold medals in the 80-meter hurdles and javelin throw as well as a silver medal in the high jump at the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics.

Score: 100

Golf: 50; Track: 50

 

3. Bob Hayes, Track-Football

“Bullet Bob” was the fastest man alive — winning gold medals in the 100 meters and 4x100-meter relay at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics — before going on to have a Hall of Fame career as a wide receiver with the Dallas Cowboys. Hayes twice led the NFL in TD catches and won Super Bowl VI with QB Roger Staubach and coach Tom Landry.

Score: 100

Track: 50; Football: 50

 

4. Duke Kahanamoku, Swimming-Surfing

Born in 1890, “The Big Kahuna” won three Olympic medals in the 100-meter freestyle — taking gold at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics and 1920 Antwerp Olympics, and silver at the 1924 Paris Olympics — as well as a gold (1920) and silver (1912) in the 4x200-meter freestyle relay. But Mr. Hawaii was also the “Father of Surfing,” popularizing the longboard en route to becoming a member of the Surfing, Swimming and U.S. Olympic Halls of Fame.

Score: 100

Swimming: 50; Surfing: 50

 

5. Jim Brown, Football-Lacrosse

Arguably the greatest running back in history, Brown is a member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame. The 6’2”, 230-pounder is a member of the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame and is considered by many to be the best athlete to ever play the sport, earning first-team All-American honors and ranking second in the nation in scoring (43 goals in 10 games) during his senior year at Syracuse.

Score: 90

Football: 50; Lacrosse: 40

 

6. Deion Sanders, Football-Baseball

A member of both the College and Pro Football Halls of Fame, “Prime Time” is considered by many to be the greatest cornerback in NFL history — although he excelled as a return man and receiver, as well. A two-time Super Bowl champion with the San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys, Sanders was also a member of the Atlanta Braves in the 1992 World Series and played parts of nine lightning-fast seasons in MLB. In 1992, Sanders hit .304 with an .841 OPS, NL-best 14 triples and 26 steals in only 97 regular season games, while hitting .533 with five steals in four World Series games.

Score: 90

Football: 50; Baseball: 40

 

7. Shaun White, Snowboarding-Skateboarding (*active)

The San Diego native is a five-time Summer X Game skateboarding vert medalist, including golds in 2007 and 2011. But his three Olympic snowboarding halfpipe gold medals (2006 Torino, 2010 Vancouver, 2018 Pyeongchang) make White arguably the G.O.A.T. on a board. At 32, he still has a few years left to add to his 18 Winter X Games medals and 10 ESPY Awards.

Score: 90

Snowboarding: 50; Skateboarding: 40

 

8. Walter Ray Williams Jr., Bowling-Horseshoes

The seven-time PBA Player of the Year also owns six Men’s World Horseshoe Pitching titles. Many will argue his “athletic” ability, no one can argue Williams’ accomplishments.

Score: 90

Bowling: 50; Horseshoes: 40

 

9. Ronda Rousey, MMA-Judo

“Rowdy” is in the early stages of a WWE career. But her legacy as a mixed martial artist and judoka is well established. The first American woman to earn an Olympic medal in judo (bronze, 2008 Beijing) is also the first female fighter inducted into the Ultimate Fighting Championship Hall of Fame, thanks to her terrifying armbar submission hold and unprecedented pay-per-view value.

Score: 90

MMA: 50; Judo: 40

 

10. Bo Jackson, Football-Baseball

Only Bo knows what might have been. The 1985 Heisman Trophy winner at Auburn was a Pro Bowl running back for the L.A. Raiders and an All-Star outfielder for the Kansas City Royals — hitting 32 HRs and 105 RBIs in just 135 games in 1989 — before a hip injury derailed the out-of-this-world athlete.

Score: 80

Football: 40; Baseball: 40

 

11. Charlie Ward, Basketball-Football

Ward played 11 seasons in the NBA, starting at point guard for the New York Knicks’ Eastern Conference champs in 1999. But most know him as a Heisman Trophy winner and national championship-winning QB at Florida State in 1993. He also played on one of FSU’s most exciting basketball teams ever, alongside future NBA stars Sam Cassel and Bob Sura.

Score: 80

Basketball: 40; Football: 40

 

12. Gene Conley, Baseball-Basketball

A four-time MLB All-Star and 1957 World Series champion with the Milwaukee Braves, the 6’8”, 225-pound Conley also won three NBA championships with the Boston Celtics — becoming the only athlete in history to win world titles in two of the big four pro leagues.

Score: 80

Baseball: 40; Basketball: 40

 

13. Dave DeBusschere, Basketball-Baseball

A two-time NBA champion and Hall of Famer with the New York Knicks, DeBusschere also pitched two seasons for the Chicago White Sox, throwing a complete-game shutout against the Cleveland Indians on Aug. 13, 1963, and posting a career 3–4 record with a 2.90 ERA.

Score: 80

Basketball: 50; Baseball: 30

 

14. Dave Winfield, Baseball-Basketball

A 22-year MLB veteran, 12-time All-Star, World Series champ and member of the Baseball Hall of Fame, Winfield also played college basketball at the University of Minnesota — where he helped lead the Golden Gophers to the 1972 Big Ten title.

Score: 80

Baseball: 50; Basketball: 30

 

15. Dick Groat, Baseball-Basketball

The 1960 NL MVP and two-time World Series champ was also a two-time All-American basketball player at Duke, where his No. 10 jersey became the first retired number at Cameron Indoor Stadium. The No. 3 overall pick in the 1952 NBA Draft also played one season for the Fort Wayne Pistons.

Score: 80

Baseball: 40; Basketball: 40

 

16. Jackie Robinson, Baseball-Track

The 1949 NL MVP and 1955 World Series champ is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame and a civil rights pioneer. But he was also the 1940 NCAA Men’s Outdoor Long Jump champion at UCLA.

Score: 80

Baseball: 50; Track: 30

 

17. Jonathan Ogden, Football-Shot Put

The 6’9”, 345-pound Ogden was the 1996 NCAA Men’s Indoor Shot Put champion at UCLA, before becoming a Hall of Famer and Super Bowl XXXV champion left tackle with the Baltimore Ravens.

Score: 80

Football: 50; Shot Put: 30

 

18. James Jett, Football-Track

As fast as his last name indicates, Jett won a gold medal as a member of the 4x100-meter relay team at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. Jett then signed as an undrafted free agent with the speed-obsessed Al Davis and his L.A./Oakland Raiders, where he played from 1993-2002.

Score: 80

Track: 50; Football: 30

 

19. Marion Jones, Track-Basketball

Once a golden girl, Jones’ reputation has since been tarnished by PED use and jail time. Before the fall, Jones won three gold and two bronze medals at the 2000 Sydney Olympics after a standout hoops career at the University of North Carolina — where she was a member of the 1994 NCAA champion Tar Heels.

Score: 80

Track: 50; Basketball: 30

 

20. Kyler Murray, Football-Baseball (*active)

The No. 9 overall pick in the 2018 MLB Draft has also declared for the 2019 NFL Draft, following a Heisman Trophy campaign at Oklahoma this fall. Only time (and money) will determine which sport Murray chooses. But he certainly has options…

Score: 70

Football: 40; Baseball: 30

 

21. Brian Jordan, Baseball-Football

A one-time MLB All-Star who played in the bigs for 15 years, Jordan played three seasons (1989-91) as a safety in the NFL before making his debut in The Show in 1992.

Score: 70

Baseball: 40; Football: 30

 

22. Jeff Samardzija, Baseball-Football (*active)

“The Shark” was an All-American and Biletnikoff Award finalist, finishing his Notre Dame football career as the Irish’s all-time leading receiver prior to earning $83 million (plus another $40 mil in future 2019-20 salaries) as a right-handed MLB pitcher.

Score: 70

Baseball: 40; Football: 30

 

23. Danny Ainge, Basketball-Baseball

The Wooden Award winner at BYU, Ainge won two NBA championships with the Boston Celtics and was an All-Star in 1988. He also had a cup of coffee with the Toronto Blue Jays, playing three seasons from 1979-81.

Score: 70

Basketball: 40; Baseball: 30

 

24. Darin Erstad, Baseball-Football

The 1995 Golden Spikes Award winner as the nation’s top collegiate baseball player was also the starting punter on Nebraska’s 1994 national championship football team before going on to play 14 seasons in MLB.

Score: 70

Baseball: 40; Football: 30

 

25. Kenny Lofton, Baseball-Basketball

A six-time All-Star, five-time stolen base champ and four-time Gold Glove center fielder, Lofton’s first love was basketball. He played point guard for the University of Arizona, making the Final Four in 1988.

Score: 70

Baseball: 40; Basketball: 30

 

26. Ed Reed, Football-Javelin

The 1999 Big East Outdoor Track and Field Championships javelin title winner went on to a record-breaking NFL career. The soon-to-be Hall of Famer set NFL records with 1,590 interception return yards and a 107-yard INT return while winning Super Bowl XLVII and being named 2004 NFL Defensive Player of the Year.

Score: 70

Football: 50; Javelin: 20

 

 

27. Terry Bradshaw, Football-Javelin

The four-time Super Bowl champion Pittsburgh Steelers QB broke the national high school record for javelin throw — four weeks in a row back in April 1966 — maxing out with a toss of 245 feet. The feat earned Bradshaw a spot in the Sports Illustrated weekly feature, Faces in the Crowd.

Score: 70

Football: 50; Javelin: 20

 

28. Hale Irwin, Golf-Football

The three-time U.S. Open winner and World Golf Hall of Famer was also a two-time All-Big Eight defensive back at the University of Colorado.

Score: 70

Golf: 50; Football: 20

 

29. Antonio Gates, Football-Basketball (*active)

Gates led Kent State to its first MAC championship and a trip to the Elite Eight in the 2002 NCAA Tournament before becoming an eight-time Pro Bowl tight end for the San Diego Chargers. Gates originally enrolled at Michigan State to play football for Nick Saban and basketball for Tom Izzo. However, Saban wanted Gates to focus on football. Instead, Gates transferred, played basketball exclusively and signed on as an undrafted free agent in the NFL.

Score: 70

Football: 50; Basketball: 20

 

30. Tony Gwynn, Baseball-Basketball

The sweet-swinging Gwynn was a Hall of Famer, 15-time All-Star and eight-time batting champ with a career .338 batting average and 3,141 hits. But Gwynn was also an All-WAC point guard at San Diego State, setting school records for assists in a season and career.

Score: 70

Baseball: 50; Basketball: 20

 

31. Bob Gibson, Baseball-Basketball

The 1968 NL MVP was a two-time Cy Young winner and two-time World Series MVP with the St. Louis Cardinals. The intimidating Hall of Fame ace was also a Jesuit All-American basketball player for Creighton University in his hometown of Omaha, Neb., before briefly playing for the Harlem Globetrotters.

Score: 70

Baseball: 50; Basketball: 20

 

32. Mookie Betts, Baseball-Bowling (*active)

The 2018 AL MVP and World Series champion is a member of the 30-30 club (HR and steals), an MLB batting champ and three-time Gold Glove center fielder just hitting his prime, having just turned 26. Mookie is also a part-time pro bowler on the PBA, having once bowled a perfect 300 score in the PBA World Series of Bowling.

Score: 70

Baseball: 40; Bowling: 30

 

33. Ed “Too Tall” Jones, Football-Boxing

A three-time Pro Bowl defensive lineman and Super Bowl XII champion, the 6’9” Jones had a scary 88-inch reach as a boxer — going 6–0 with five KOs in 1979.

Score: 70

Football: 40; Boxing: 30

 

34. Herschel Walker, Football-Bobsled

The 1982 Heisman Trophy winner at Georgia and College Football Hall of Famer participated in the two-man bobsled competition at the 1992 Albertville Olympics, finishing seventh.

Score: 70

Football: 40; Bobsled: 30

 

35. Joe Thomas, Football-Shot Put

Thomas was an ironman left tackle who played 167 consecutive games for the Cleveland Browns before a career-ending left triceps injury. He was also an All-Big Ten selection while competing in the shot put and discus throw at the University of Wisconsin.

Score: 70

Football: 50; Shot Put: 20

 

36. Joe Mauer, Baseball-Football

Before Mauer was the 2009 AL MVP and three-time batting champion for the Minnesota Twins, the 6’5” athlete with a cannon for a right arm was USA Today’s High School Player of the Year as a quarterback.

Score: 60

Baseball: 40; Football: 20

 

37. Tony Gonzalez, Football-Basketball

Gonzalez round-balled into the Sweet 16 at Cal-Berkeley before becoming a 14-time Pro Bowl tight end with 1,325 catches, 15,127 yards and 111 TDs over 17 seasons (playing 270-of-272 games) for the Kansas City Chiefs and Atlanta Falcons.

Score: 60

Football: 50; Basketball: 10

 

38. Julius Peppers, Football-Basketball (*active)

The pass-rusher was a glass-crasher at the University of North Carolina, where he came off the bench for the Tar Heels’ 2000 Final Four squad.

Score: 60

Football: 50; Basketball: 10

 

39. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Wrestling-Football

The WWE wrestler-turned-movie star was a backup defensive lineman on the University of Miami’s 1991 national championship team. During his time at The U, The Rock played with future NFL stars like Ray Lewis and Warren Sapp.

Score: 60

Wrestling: 50; Football: 10

 

40. Marquise Goodwin, Football-Track (*active)

A two-time NCAA long jump champion at University of Texas and 2012 London Olympics long jump qualifier, Goodwin has also been one of the NFL’s fastest receivers over his first four seasons with the Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers.

Score: 60

Football: 30; Track: 30

 

41. Chuck Connors, Baseball-Basketball

“The Rifleman” is known mostly for his successful acting career, but the 6’5” Connors did make brief appearances in both the NBA (Boston Celtics) and MLB (Chicago Cubs).

Score: 60

Baseball: 30; Basketball: 30

 

42. John Lucas, Basketball-Tennis

The No. 1 overall pick in the 1976 NBA Draft, Lucas was an All-American in both basketball and tennis at the University of Maryland — winning the ACC men’s singles tennis title in 1974 and 1976

Score: 60

Basketball: 30; Tennis: 30

 

43. Scott Burrell, Basketball-Baseball

The first athlete selected in the first round of two of the big four sports’ drafts — Burrell went No. 20 overall to the Charlotte Hornets in the 1993 NBA Draft and No. 26 overall to the Seattle Mariners in the 1989 MLB Draft.

Score: 60

Basketball: 30; Baseball: 30

 

44. Lolo Jones, Track-Bobsled

A pair of Summer Olympic heartbreakers in the 100-meter hurdles — including a fall at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and a fourth-place finish at the 2012 London Olympics — led to Lolo joining Team USA's bobsled team at the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

Score: 60

Track: 30; Bobsled: 30

 

45. Michael Jordan, Basketball-Baseball

“His Airness” is generally regarded as the greatest basketball player of all-time. However, in 127 games playing for the Chicago White Sox’s Double-A affiliate Birmingham Barons, “Air Jordan” hit just .202 with three HRs, 51 RBIs and 30 stolen bases.

Score: 60

Basketball: 50; Baseball: 10

 

46. John Lynch, Football-Baseball

A two-sport star at Stanford and a Super Bowl XXXVII championship-winning fringe-Hall of Fame safety in the NFL, Lynch has the unique distinction of throwing the first pitch in Florida Marlins organization history. The Erie Sailors jersey he wore that day is on display at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown — although he quit with a 1–3 record and 2.35 ERA over nine games in the minors.

Score: 60

Football: 40; Baseball: 20

 

47. Frank Thomas, Baseball-Football

The “Big Hurt” was a two-time AL MVP and Hall of Fame slugger after his brief career as a tight end at Auburn was over. “If he had stuck with football, he’d be going in the Hall of Fame as a football player,” legendary Auburn coach Pat Dye told AuburnTigers.com.

Score: 60

Baseball: 50; Football: 10

 

48. John Elway, Football-Baseball

The two-time Super Bowl champion QB used his baseball prospects as a negotiating tactic. After being selected No. 1 overall by the Baltimore Colts in the 1983 NFL Draft, Elway threatened to quit football and play baseball — where the New York Yankees had picked him with the No. 52 overall pick in 1981 (six picks ahead of Tony Gwynn). Elway was traded to the Denver Broncos and the rest is history.

Score: 60

Football: 50; Baseball: 10

 

49. Tom Glavine, Baseball-Hockey

The Hall of Fame lefty, two-time Cy Young winner and 1995 World Series MVP was the No. 69 overall pick of the L.A. Kings in the 1984 NHL Draft after a standout New England prep hockey career.

Score: 60

Baseball: 50; Hockey: 10

 

50. Allen Iverson, Basketball-Football

“The Answer” won Virginia AAA state titles in both football and basketball, while also being named AP High School Player of the Year in both sports — as a junior, before being suspended due to a controversial bowling alley brawl as a senior. The 2001 NBA MVP reportedly wanted to play football at Notre Dame, before ultimately hooping at Georgetown.

Score: 60

Basketball: 50; Football: 10

 

51. John Smoltz, Baseball-Golf (*active)

Smoltz was a Cy Young-winning starting pitcher and Rolaids Relief Man Award-winning closer during a Hall of Fame career that also included a World Series win. Always rumored to be the best golfer among elite athletes, “Smoltzie” qualified for the U.S. Senior Open this summer.

Score: 60

Baseball: 50; Golf: 10

 

52. Steph Curry, Basketball-Golf (*active)

Steph’s not officially a Hall of Famer, but he’s a Hall of Famer. The three-time NBA champ and two-time MVP who changed the geometry of basketball also has a sweet stroke on the golf course — playing in Web.com Tour events the past two summers. Chef Curry with the putt…

Score: 60

Basketball: 50; Golf: 10

 

53. Elena Delle Donne, Basketball-Volleyball (*active)

The 2015 WNBA MVP took a hiatus from basketball — after transferring from UConn to Delaware — and the 6’5” star was a force to be reckoned with on the volleyball court.

Score: 60

Basketball: 50; Volleyball: 10

 

54. Roy Jones Jr., Boxing-Basketball

The BWAA “Fighter of the Decade” in the 1990s famously played for the USBL’s Jacksonville Barracudas before defending his super middleweight title belt later the same day. “Y’all Must Have Forgot!”

Score: 60

Boxing: 50; Basketball: 10

 

55. Manny Pacquiao, Boxing-Basketball

The BWAA “Fighter of the Decade” in the 2000s was a 5’5.5” guard with an unorthodox lefty jump shot in the Philippine Basketball Association.

Score: 60

Boxing: 50; Basketball: 10

 

56. Jimmy Graham, Football-Basketball (*active)

Played four years of basketball at the University of Miami but just one season of football at The U. The 6’6”, 260-pound power forward has been one of the NFL’s best tight ends during his nine-year pro career.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Basketball: 10

 

57. Ronald Curry, Football-Basketball

Curry won both MVP and the Slam Dunk Contest at the 1998 McDonald’s All-American game while also winning three state titles in football. Curry played both sports at North Carolina, before switching from QB to WR during a seven-year NFL career.

Score: 50

Football: 30; Basketball: 20

 

58. Tim Tebow, Football-Baseball (*active)

A two-time national champ and Heisman Trophy winner at Florida, Tebow played three seasons in the NFL, leading the Denver Broncos to a playoff win over the Pittsburgh Steelers following the 2011 season. In 2016, Tebow inked a minor league baseball deal with the New York Mets and has been living the dream ever since, most recently making the Eastern League All-Star Game before a hand injury ended his 2018 season.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Baseball: 10

 

Jameis Winston, QB

59. Jameis Winston, Football-Baseball (*active)

A national champion and Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback at Florida State, Winston served as the Seminoles baseball team's 90-plus-mph flame-throwing closer and was named preseason third-team All-American by Baseball America in 2014. Winston was the No. 1 overall pick of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2015.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Baseball: 10

 

60. Chris Weinke, Football-Baseball

A second-round pick of the Toronto Blue Jays out of high school and spent six years in the minor leagues before quitting baseball and opting to play football at Florida State, where he became the oldest Heisman Trophy winner ever (at 28) and led the Seminoles to the 1999 national title.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Baseball: 10

 

61. Russell Wilson, Football-Baseball (*active)

The Seattle Seahawks’ Super Bowl XLVIII title-winning QB was a fourth-round pick of the Colorado Rockies and acquired by the Texas Rangers in the 2013 Rule 5 Draft before being ceremoniously traded to the New York Yankees in 2018.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Baseball: 10

 

62. Donovan McNabb, Football-Basketball

The greatest QB in Syracuse history — and arguably the top QB in Philadelphia Eagles history — was also a walk-on guard on the Orange team that lost to Kentucky in the 1996 NCAA Tournament title game.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Basketball: 10

 

63. Ricky Williams, Football-Baseball

The former Heisman Trophy winner and NFL rushing leader took a swing at baseball but failed to hit in stints with minor league teams in the Philadelphia Phillies, Montreal Expos and Texas Rangers organizations. (His Rangers “career” was essentially a photo-op for one of the most beloved Texas Longhorns.)

Score: 50

Football: 40; Baseball: 10

 

64. Todd Helton, Baseball-Football

A five-time MLB All-Star and 2000 MLB batting champ, Helton threw for 484 yards, four TDs and three INTs during a brief football career at the University of Tennessee — where he was “Wally Pipp’d” following a knee injury by a freshman named Peyton Manning.

Score: 50

Baseball: 40; Football: 10

 

65. Tony Clark, Baseball-Basketball

The MLB All-Star switch-hitting first baseman was also an accomplished basketball player at the University of Arizona and San Diego State. As a high schooler, Clark broke Bill Walton’s San Diego high school scoring record.

Score: 50

Baseball: 40; Basketball: 10

 

66. Tony Romo, Football-Golf (*active)

The former Dallas Cowboys QB is on his way to a Hall of Fame broadcasting career at CBS. But he’s also still pursuing golf, where he has dominated celebrity and amateur tournaments, attempted to qualify for the U.S. Open and missed the cut on a PGA Tour sponsor’s exemption.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Golf: 10

 

67-70. All-Pro Curling Team, Football-Curling (*active)

Retired NFL Pro Bowlers Jared Allen (DE), Marc Bulger (QB), Keith Bulluck (LB) and Michael Roos (LT) recently formed the “All-Pro Curling Team” and hope to make the 2022 Beijing Olympics. Good luck, gentlemen.

Score: 50

Football: 40; Curling: 10

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